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You Can't Hold The LP Price Lin 

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RCA Reorganization: Create Product 

... Clive Davis: 


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Qwth . . . RIAA 




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I $100 Mil 




By Cre(§d Ta ‘ 
uling For 







It used to be Jerry Naylor of the Crickets. 

But now he’s going in a new direction. With his new single, “But For Love.’’ 
It’sgettingan incredible responseon major Top 40 stations around the country. 

And if things keep going the way they are, Jerry’s new single 
will have a new name, too. Hit. 

Jenv Navlor "But For Love "On Columbia Records 

. * 4S-45106 


6 


THE INTERNATIONAL MUSIC-RECORD WEEKLY 






VOL. XXXI — Number 31/February 28, 1970 


Publication Office/ 1780 Broadway, New York, New York 10019 / Telephone: JUdson 6-2640/Cable Address. Cash Box, N Y, 


GEORGE ALBERT 
President and Publisher 

MARTY OSTROW 
Vice President 

IRV LICHTMAN 
Editor in Chief 

EDITORIAL 

AAARV GOODAAAN 


When You Can't Hold 
The Album Price Line 


Assoc. Editor 
ALLAN RINDE 
West Coast Editor 
JOHN KLEIN 
NORAAAN STEINBERG 
ED KELLEHER 
FRED HOLMAN 


EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

MIKE MARTUCCI 
ANTHONY LANZETTA 

ADVERTISING 

BERNIE BLAKE 

Director of Advertising 

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 

STAN SOIFER, New York 
HARVEY GELLER, Hollywood 
WOODY HARDING 
Art Director 


COIN MACHINE & VENDING 

ED ADLUM 
General Manager 

BOB COHEN, Assistant 
CAMILLE COMPASIO, Chicago 
LISSA MORROW, Hollywood 

CIRCULATION 

THERESA TORTOSA, Mgr. 


HOLLYWOOD 

HARVEY GELLER 

6430 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 90028 
Phone: (2T3) 465-2129 

NASHVILLE 

JUANITA JONES 

806 16th Ave. South, Nashville, Tenn. 37203 
Phone: (615) 244-2898 

CHICAGO “ 

CAMILLE COMPASIO 

29 E. Madison St., Chicago, III. Phone: (312) FI 6-7272 


INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR 

CARLO NISTRI 

3 Cork Street, London Tel. 01-7342374 


ENGLAND 

ITALY 

DORRIS LAND 

BRUNO POZZA 

3 Cork Street 

5, Corso Europa 

London 

AAilan 

Tel. 01-7342374 

Tel: 704691 

GERMANY 

CHRISTIAN TOERSLEFF 

2 Hamburg 56 
Leuchtturmeg 30 

Tel: 34-91-94-86 

HOLLAND 

PAUL ACKET 
Theresiastraat 59-63 

The Hague 

Tel: 837700 


BELGIUM 

BRAZIL 

Etienne Smet 

PEDRO FRAZAO 

Hugo Verrieststraat 87 

DE VASCONCELOS 

Sint-Niklaas (wass) 

Rua Frei Caneca, 1 1, Apt. 13 

Tel: (03) 76.48.80 

Sao Paulo, S.P., Brazil 

AUSTRALIA 

Tel: 239.40 18 

RON TUDOR 

ARGENTINA 

8 Francis St., 

MIGUEL SMIRNOFF 

Heathmont, Victoria 

Belgrano 3252, Piso 4 "B" 

Tel: 870-5677 

Buenos Aires, Argentina 

MEXICO 

Tel: 89-6796 

SALVADOR ARREGUIN 

CANADA 

ANTONIO SENS 

WALT GREALIS 

Tiber 100 — 7 y 8 Pisos 

RPAA 

1560 Bayview Ave. 

Mexico 5, D.F. 

Tel: 25-39-52 11-62-96 

Toronto 17, Ontario 

JAPAN 

Tel: (416) 89-2166 

Adv. Mgr. 


SHOICHI KUSANO 

FRANCE 

Editorial Mgr. 

FRANC G. LIPSIC 

MORIHIRO NAGATA 

32 Rue De Moulin July 

466 Higfashi-OIzumi 

Paris XI 

Neirimaku 

Tel. 023-90-06 

Tokyo 


SUBSCRIPTION RATES $30 per year anywhere in the U.S.A., 
Published weekly by Cash Box, 1780 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 
10019. Second class postage paid at Hartford, Conn. 06105 U.S.A. 

Copyright ® 1970 by The Cosh Box Publishing Co., Inc. All 

rights reserved. Copyright under Universal Copyright Convention. 


The music business no longer oper- 
ates under comfortable constants. It’s 
been sometime, for instance, since 
the business found that it could parlay 
a hit single into a hit album without 
doing harm to the million-selling sound 
of the single, or, in reverse, offer hit 
sounds in singles form from album 
product without limiting the sales 
factor of both. Also gone from the 
scene is the idea that the same song 
cannot have another chart run right on 
top of the “original” hit. 

Well, another constant has been 
challenged by the business and its ef- 
fect has been economically sound. 
This is the concept that IP’s must fall 
into neat pricing categories, starting, 
in the regular-priced area, from $4.98 
for pop, perhaps a dollar or two more 
for original casters or classical items. 
Manufacturers are facing the econom- 
ic facts of life by charging for product 
on the more realistic basis of cost 
factors that cry out for a variable pric- 
ing policy, one that takes into account 
an economic appraisal of each album. 
The variables that affect LP costs are 
many: One album may contain more 
songs, (above the industry norm of 11), 
thus requiring a higher royalty pay- 
ment by the manufacturer; “event” 
packaging, a costly approach toward 
making LP’s a visual as well as audio 
“happening” (a method, by the way. 


of making taping-off-the-air fall short 
of having the “complete” offering by 
a disk attraction); the higher cost of 
indie producer (deals; the continuing 
increases in the general costs of doing 
business; studio time required to re- 
cord a complex group; higher royalty 
rates to acquire certain artists; and 
so on. 

The variable pricing philosophy is 
not one to be viewed as merely an 
automatic excuse for charging more 
for LP product. By the album’s con- 
tents and the way it’s presented to 
the public, the consumer should be 
able to judge quite clearly why he is 
paying more for one album over an- 
other. For variable pricing could also 
include a lower price tag if, in the 
manufacturer’s judgment, the album 
can . prove a success without the extra 
added attractions of more material 
and elaborate packaging. And by “suc- 
cess” we also mean, of course, a prof- 
itable venture. 

What is important is that a man- 
ufacturer care more about the cost 
factors that go into every individual 
release and then decide (traditional 
pricing standards notwithstanding) 
what he must charge for this release. 
All the hits in the world are meaning- 
less to the music industry if it’s oper- 
ating under the shadow of “profit- 
less prosperity.” 





• 

BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED 


CM 

CM 


WATER 

Simon & Garfunkel-Columbia 45079 

5 

18 

2 

HEY THERE LONELY GIRL 

Ed Holman-ABC 11240 

2 

5 

3 

THANK YOU 

Sly & Family Stone-Epic 10555 

1 

2 

4 

NO TIME 

Guess Who-RCA 0300 

4 

8 

5 

PSYCHEDELIC SHACK 

Temptations-Gordy 7096 

6 

11 

• 

RAINY NIGHT IN GEORGIA 

Brook Benton-Cotillion 44057 

8 

15 

• 

TRAVELIN’ BAND 

Creedence Clearwater Revival-Fantasy 637 

13 

16 

8 

VENUS 

Shocking Blue-Colossus 108 

3 

1 

9 

RAINDROPS KEEP FALLIN’ ON 
MY HEAD 

B, J Thomas-Scepter SPS 12265 

7 

4 


MA BELLE AMIE 

Tee Set-Colossus 107 

14 

23 

11 

HONEY COMEBACK 

Glen Campbell-Capitol 2718 

11 

12 

12 

WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES 

Joe South-Capitoi 2704 

12 

13 


RAPPER 

Jaggerz-Kama Sutra 502 

18 

28 

14 

WHO’LL STOP THE RAIN 

Creedence Clearwater Revival-Fantasy 637 

17 

21 

15 

THE THRILL IS GONE 

B. B, King-Bluesway 61032 

16 

20 

16 

ARIZONA 

Mark Lmdsay-Columbla 45037 

9 

9 

17 

1 WANT YOU BACK 

Jackson 5-Motown 1157 

15 

3 


EVIL WAYS 

Santana-Columbia 45069 

29 

38 


HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN 

Frijid Pink-Parrot 341 

38 

60 


GIVEME JUST A LITTLE 

MORE TIME 

Chairmen Of The Board-Invictus 9074 

28 

37 

@ 

DIDN’T 1 (BLOW YOUR MIND 
THIS TIME) 

Delfonics-Philly Groove 161 

27 

31 

22 

ALWAYS SOMETHING THERE 

TO REMIND ME 

R, B. Greaves-Atco 6726 

23 

29 

© 

V- Sv 

KENTUCKY RAIN 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9791 

31 

45 

(24) 

HE AIN’T HEAVY, 

HE’S MY BROTHER 

Hollies-Eplc 10532 

34 

49 

25 

I’LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN 

Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12273 

10 

7 

@ 

NEVER HAD A DREAM 

COME TRUE 

Stevie Wonder-Tamla 54191 

35 

44 

27 

WITHOUT LOVE 

Tom Jones-Parrot 40045 

20 

6 

28 

BABY TAKE ME IN YOUR ARMS 

Jefferson-Janus 106 

19 

19 

0 

OH ME, OH MY 

Lulu-Atco 6722 

37 

46 

30 

NEW WORLD COMING 

Mama Cass-Dunhill 4225 

33 

41 

® 

CALL ME 

Aretha Franklin-Atlantic 2706 

44 

53 

32 

BREAKING UP IS HARD TO DO 

Lenny Welch-Commonwealth United 3004 

32 

35 

© 

IT’S A NEW DAY 

James Brown-King 6292 

42 

51 



35 

36 

37 

38 



47 


49 





64 

66 

67 


EASY COME. EASY GO 

Bobby Sherman-Metromedia 177 

IF I WERE A CARPENTER 

Johnny Cash & June Carter-Columbia 45064 

OH WHAT A DAY 

Dells-Cadet 5663 

WHOLE LOTTA LOVE 

Led Zeppelin-Atlantic 2690 

I’VE GOTTA MAKE 
YOU LOVE ME 

Steam-Mercury 73020 

WALKIN’ IN THE RAIN 

Jay & Americans-UA 50605 

LOVE GROWS 

Edison Lighthouse-Bell 858 

JENNIFER TOMPKINS 

street People-Musicor 1365 

MY ELUSIVE DREAMS 

Bobby Vinton-Epic 10576 

SOMETHING’S BURNING 

Kenny Rogers & First Edition-Reprise 0888 

THE BELLS 

Origmals-Soul 35069 

TAKE A LOOK AROUND 

Smith-Dunhill 4228 

WALKING THROUGH 
THE COUNTRY 

Grass Roots-Dunhill 4227 

IF I NEVER KNEW YOUR NAME 

Vic Dana-Liberty 56150 

ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM 

Glen Campbell & Bobbie Gentry-Capitol 2745 

FANCY 

Bobbie Gentry-Capitol 2675 

GOTTA HOLD ON 
TO THIS FEELING 

Jr, Walker & The All Stars-Soul 35070 

GOTTA GET BACK TO YOU 

Tommy James & The Shondells-Roulette 7073 

CELEBRATE 

Three Dog Night-Dunhill 4229 

RAG MAMA RAG 

The Band-Capitol 2705 

THE TOUCH OF YOU 

Brenda & Tabulations-Top & Bottom 401 

WHY SHOULD I CRY 

Gentrys-Sun 1108 

KEEP ON DOIN’ 

Isley Bros.-T-Neck 

GOOD GUYS ONLY WIN 
IN THE MOVIES 

Mel & Tim-Bamboo 109 

STIR IT UP AND SERVE IT 

Tommy Roe-ABC 11258 

INSTANT KARMA 

John Ono Lennon-Apple 1816 

UNTIL ITS TIME 
FOR YOU TO GO 

Neil Diamond-Uni 55204 

WHO’S YOUR BABY 

Archies-Kirshner 5003 

DO THE FUNKY CHICKEN 

Rufus ThomaS'Stax 0059 

COME AND GET IT 

Badfinger-Apple 1815 

YOU GOT ME HUMMIN’ 

Cold Blood-San Francisco 60 

COME TOGETHER 

Ike & Tina Turner-Minit 32087 

THE DECLARATION 

5th Dimension-Bell 860 

TEMMA HARBOUR 

Mary Hopkins-Appie 1816 


46 68 
26 30 
36 39 
22 10 

39 42 
21 14 

53 70 
43 36 
51 62 

54 65 

62 77 

57 72 

56 66 

49 56 

58 82 
48 34 

63 - 

68 81 
67 - 

64 - 

59 64 

50 55 
61 71 

66 76 
85 - 

72 - 

89 - 

69 79 

76 87 

65 67 

77 - 

70 80 

71 - 


68 

CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE 

Al Martino-Capitol 2746 

73 

85 

• 

SPIRIT IN THE SKY 

Norman Greenbaum-Reprise 0885 

97 


• 

SILLY SILLY FOOL 

Dusty Springfield-Atlantic 2705 

80 


• 

VICTORIA 

Kinks-Reprise 0863 

82 

90 

72 

SUPERSTAR 

Murray Flead-Decca 732603 

74 

78 

73 

SPARKLE & SHINE 

Clique-White Whale 338 

79 


74 

IF YOU’VE GOT A HEART 

Bobby Bland-Duke 458 

75 

75 

75 

HEARTBREAKER 

Grand Funk Rallroad-Capitol 2732 

81 

88 

76 

JUST SEVENTEEN 

The Raiders-Columbia 45022 

83 

89 

V 

LETS GIVE ADAM & EVE 
ANOTHER CHANCE 

Gary Puckett & Union Gap-Columbia 45097 



78 

YOU’RE THE ONE Pt. II 

Little Sister-Stone Flower 9000 

84 

98 

79 

1984 

SpIrit-Ode 128 

87 

95 

80 

OH WELL PART 1 

Fleetwood Mac-Reprise 0883 

86 

94 

81 

COMIN’ HOME 

Delaney & Bonnie & Friends-Atco 6725 

88 

96 

82 

MELTING POT 

Blue Mink-Philips 40658 

90 

97 


LAY LADY LAY 

Ferrante & Teicher-United Artists 50646 



84 

TICKET TO RIDE 

Carpenters-A&M 1142 

91 


(§) 

RUN SALLY RUN 

Cuff Links-Decca 32639 



86 

BRIGHTON HILL 

Jackie DeShannon-Imperial 66438 

92 


87 

1 JUST CAN’T HELP FALLING 

IN LOVE 

Andy Williams-Columbia 45084 

93 


88 

MISSISSIPPI MAMA 

Owen B. -Janus 107 

95 


89 

WELFARE CADILAC 

Guy Drake-Royal American 1 

94 

99 

90 

SHILO 

Neil Diamond-Bang 575 

96 


91 

CALIFORNIA GIRL 

Eddie Floyd-Stax 0060 



92 

THE GHETTO 

Donny Hathaway-Atco 6719 

98 

100 

93 

REFLECTIONS OF MY LIFE 

Marmalade-London 20058 



94 

CAT WALK 

Village Soul Choir-Abbott 2010 


98 

95 

TAKE IT OFF HIM & PUT 

IT ON ME 

Clarence Carter-Atlantic 2702 



96 

YOU’RE RIGHT, RAY CHARLES 

Joe Tex-Dial 4096 



97 

BABY MAKE IT SOON 

Flying Machine-Congress 4012 

99 


98 

DON’T GET CLOSE 

Little Anthony & Imperials-United Artists 50625 



99 

TO THE OTHER WOMAN 

Dons Duke-Canyon 28 

100 


100 

LONG LONESOME HIGHWAY 

Michael Parks-MGM 11104 




ALPHABETIZED TOP 100 (INCLUDING PUBLISHERS AND LICENSEES) 


All 1 Have To Do Is Dream (House of Bryant— BMI) 48 

Always Something There To Remind Me (Blue Seas/Jac/Ann 
Rachel-ASCAP) 22 

Good Guys Only Win In The Movies (Cachand/Patcheal— BMI) 57 

Gotta Get Back To You (Big Seven— BMI) 51 

Gotta Hold On To This Feeling (Jobete— BMI) 50 

Long Lonesome Highway (Hastmgs/Rivers— BMI) 100 

Love Grows (January— BMI) 40 

Ma Belle Amie (Legacy— BMI) 10 

Stir It Up & Serve It (Low-Twi- BMI) 58 

Superstar (Leeds Music— ASCAP) 72 

Take A Look Around (Trousdale— BMI) 45 

Take It Off Him & Put It On Me (Fame-BMI) 95 

Temma Harbour (Major Oak— ASCAP) 67 

Thank You (Stone Flower— BMI) 3 

The Thrill Is Gone (Feist Grosvenor— ASCA) 15 

Arizona (Kangaroo— BMI) ... 16 

Baby Make It Soon (January— BMI) 97 

Baby, Take Me In Your Arms (January/Welbeck— BMI) 28 

Bells, The (Jobete— BMI) 44 

He Ain’t Heavy He's My Brother (Harrison— ASCAP) 24 

Heartbreaker (Story Book— BMI) 75 

Hey There Lonely Girl (Famous— ASCAP) 2 

Mississippi Mama (Pocket Full of Tunes— BMI) 88 

My Elusive Dreams (Tree— BMI) 42 

Never Had A Dream Come True (Jobete— BMI) 26 

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do (Screen Gems/Columbia— BMI) 32 

Bridge Over Troubled Waters (Charing Cross— BMI) 1 

Brighton Hill (Unart-BMI) 86 

California Girl (East/Memphis— BMI) .. 91 

Call Me (Pundit— BMI) 31 

Can’t Help Falling In Love (Gladys— ASCAP) 87 

Catwalk (Arden— BMI) 94 

House Of The Rising Sun (Al Gallico Music— BMI) 19 

1 Just Can't Help Falling In Love (Gladys— ASCAP) 68 

It 1 Were A Carpenter (Faithful Virtue— BMI) 35 

It You've Got A Heart (Don— BMI) 74 

I'll Never Fall In Love Again (Blue Seas/Jac/E.H. 

Morris— ASCAP) 25 

Instant Karma (Maclen— BMI) 59 

19’84 (iiolienbeck-BMI) '. 79 

No Time (Dunbar— BMI) ’ 4 

Oh Me Oh My (Noo Track-ASCAP) 29 

Oh Well (Part 1) (Fleetwood Mac-BMI) 80 

OhWhatADay(LasGoRound-BMI) 36 

Psychedelic Shack (Jobete— BMI) 5 

To The Other Woman (J. Williams/No Exit/Wally Roker- BMI). 99 

Touch Of You, The (One-Eyed Soul— BMI) .... 54 

Traveling Band (Jondora— BMI) .... 7 

Until li s Time For Me To Go (Gypsy Boy— ASCAP) 60 

Venus (Skinny Zach Music Inc./ASCAP) .... 8 

Victoria (Hill & Range— BMI) .... 71 

Walk A Mile In My Shoes (Lowery — BMI) .... 12 

Celebrate (Commonwealth United— BMI) 52 

Come And Get Me (MacLen— BMI) 63 

Come Together (Maclen— BMI) 65 

Coming Home (Throat/Delbon/Cotillion- BMI) 81 

Declaration, The (Mobart & Fifth Star— BMI) 66 

Don't Get Close (Double Oiamond/Mured— BMI) 98 

Do The Funky Chicken (East/Memphis— BMI) 62 

Easy Come Easy Go (Screen Gems/Columbia— BMI) 34 

Evil Ways (Oleta— BMI) 18 

Fancy (Larry Shayne— ASCAP) 49 

Give Me Just A Little More Time (Gold Forever— BM 1) 20 

In The Ghetto (bon— Pow/Peer— BMI) 92 

It's A New Day (Dynatone— BMI) 33 

I’ve Gotta Make You Love Me (Little Heather Music Inc./MRC 

Inc,— BMI) 38 

1 Want You Back (Jobete— BMI) 17 

Jenniter Tomkins (Moonbeam— ASCAP) 4 1 

Just Seventeen (Boom— BMI) 76 

Keep On Doin' (Triple Three— BMI) 56 

Kentucky Ram (Elvis Presley/Last Straw— BMI) 23 

Lay Lady Lay (Big Sky— ASCAP) 83 

Let's Give Adam & Eve Another Chance (Press— BMI) 77 

Raindrops Keep Fallin On My Head (Blue Seas/Jac/20th Fox— 

ASCAP) 9 

Rainy Night In Georgia (Combine— BMI) 6 

Rapper (Sixivus— Revival/Kama Sutra- BMI) 13 

Reflections Of My Life (Walrus— ASCAP) 93 

Run Sally Run (Vanlee/Emily— ASCAP) 85 

Shllo (Tallyrand— BMI) 90 

Silly Silly Fool (Assorted — BMI) 70 

Something's Burning (BnB— BMI).. 43 

Sparkle and Shine (Big 7— BMI) 73 

Spirit In The Sky (Great Honesty— BMI) 69 

Walking In The Ram (Screen Gems/Columbia— BMI) 39 

Walking Through The Country (Malicious Melodies— ASCAP) 46 

Welfare Cadillac (Bullfighter-BMI) 89 

Whole Lotta Love (Superhype— ASCAP) 37 

Who'll Stop The Ram (Jondora— BMI) 14 

Who's Your Baby (Don Kirshner Music Inc.— BMI) 61 

Why Should 1 Cry (Knox-BMI) 55 

Without Love (There Is Nothing) (TRO)— Suffolk— BMI) 27 

You Keep Me Hummin' (Pronto/East Memphis— BMI) 64 

You’re Right, Ray Charles (Tree— BMI) 96 

You’re The One Pt. II (Stone Flower— BMI) 78 


Mantovani 
sells more LPs 
than any other artist 
year after year after 
year after year 
after year. 

There must be 
a reason 


This new LP 
is reason no. 5 1 ... . 



sraeEO psstz 




montovoni 




LOVE IS ALL 
LEMON TREE 
MIDNIGHT COWBOY 
WAND'RING STAR 
{from "Paint Your Wagon") 
LEAVING ON A Jb PLANE 


GOOD MORNING STARSHINE 


WITHOUT LOVE (There Is Noth! 

I'LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN 
(from "Promises, Promises") 
SLOWIN' IN THE WIND 
EVERYB06Y'S TALKIN' 

UP, UP AND AWAY 
DESERTED SHORE 








“j'K'if 'ai 


'lisson 5/nas 


'ewman 






ViCTOR 




Jobete Sues CBS 
As Part Of BMI’s 
Fee Pact Hassle 

DETROIT — Jobete Music, a major 
BMI member, has filed suit against 
CBS-TV in the first individual action 
by a BMI publisher against the net- 
work in the current BMI vs. the CBS 
and NBC nets. 

The action, filed in Detroit Federal 
Court, contends copyright infringe- 
ment on copyrights from the catalog 
of the Motown operation’s publishing 
division. Compensatory and punitive 
damages are demanded by the com- 
pany. 

BMI considers all its music per- 
formed on CBS and NBC as an 
infringement, a development growing 
out of no new licensing agreement 
that would have taken effect Jan. 1. 
BMI recently sued ASCAP, CBS and 
NBC charging anti-trust conspiracy 
to undermine BMI as a competitor 
in the performance of music on the 
air. The third major net, ABC, is not 
included in the BMI action because 
BMI considers that the net is par- 
ticipating in meaningful negotiations 
to arrive at a new agreement. 

Jobete contends that one of its 
copyrights, “You've Made Me So 
Very Happy,” was performed without 
license on the Red Skelton Show tele- 
cast Jan. 6. 



“Everybody,” Sly states, “Wants to 
Be a Star.” And in his own case the 
dream is only beginning to come true. 
Shifting successfully from behind the 
mike in San Francisco radio to stardom 
at Epic Records. Sly is further cemen- 
ted musically through his Daly City 
publishing and Stone Flower produc- 
tion and recording firms. 

His latest million-seller, “Thank 
You,” tells the story of his golden 
titles and the audiences are respond- 
ing with “you’re welcome— welcome 
to perform just about any time.” 
Their fifth LP, “Thank You,” will be 
released within the next few weeks. 
The group consists of Sly, his brother 
Freddie and sister Rosie, their cousin 
Larry Graham and Sly’s longtime 
friends Cynthia Robinson, Jerry Mar- 
tini and Gregg Errico. 


Index 


Album Reviews 30, 32 

Basic Album Inventory..... 48 

Coin Machine News 61-68 

Country Music Section 50-54 

Insights & Sounds 34, 36 

Looking Ahead (Singles) 14 

New Additions to Playlist 26 

Radio Active Chart 12 

Radio News Report 49 

R&B Top 50 40 

Single Reviews 20, 22 

Talent On Stage 42 

Tape News 24 

Top Hits Of The Year 44 

Top 100 Albums 47 

Vital Statistics 16, 18 


RCA Streamlines Operation w/ Product Centers; 
Directors Helm Each Unit; Tarr Is Planning VP 


NEW YORK — RCA Records has un- 
veiled a major streamlining and 
strengthening of its organization. 
Under the direction of Rocco Lagi- 
nestra, exec vice president, these 
changes, reports Norman Racusin, 
President, are designed to meet the 
growing complexities and ever-accel- 
erating changes in the music business 
in the 70’s. 

In detailing the changes, Laginestra 
announced the creation of a new posi- 
tion of division vice president of 
planning, and the institution of major 
product centers, each of which will 
have a director who will bear total 
responsibility for conception, creation 
and merchandising of product. 

Named by Laginestra to the new 
position of planning vice president is 
Irwin Tarr, formerly vice president 
of marketing. Laginestra described 
the position as “a broad scope plan- 
ning function geared to modern meth- 
ods of research, evaluation and fore- 
casting which in the future will enable 
RCA Records to allocate its resources 
and efforts in the most effective and 
profitable ways.” Laginestra said 
Tarr’s new responsibility will be di- 
vorced from the day to day operations 
of the label. Jack Burgess, formerly 


vice president of sales, was named 
vice president of marketing, replacing 
Tarr. 

Product Lines 

In announcing establishment of pro- 
duct lines, each headed by a general 
manager who will be responsible for 
conception, creation and merchan- 
dising its product, Laginestra said 
this format was dictated by the in- 
creasing segmentation of the record 
market, and the objective that RCA 
Records be strongly represented in 
every product area. 

Harry Jenkins, vice president of 
record operations, will be responsible 
for Country and Western Music, and 
Chet Atkins, vice president of A&R in 
Nashville (head of RCA Records’ 
Nashville operation), will continue to 
report to Jenkins. 

Joseph E. D’Imperio, vice president, 
will be in charge of pop music. 

Laginestra will serve as acting man- 
ager of hard rock music. The company 
is actively interviewing candidates to 
fill this position. 

Peter Dellheim will serve as acting 
manager for classical music. 

Buzz Willis will head up the R&B 


RIAA Hits Five Pressure Points 
To Combat $100 Mil Tape Piracy 


NEW YORK — Noting that almost a 
third of this year’s tape sales are be- 
ing taken over by pirated cartridges 
and cassettes. The Recording Industry 
Association of America has outlined a 
series of thrusts that RIAA instituted 
to battle the problem. Under the full- 
time supervision of attorney Jules Yar- 
nell, the Association is tackling pirates 
through drives in five major areas in- 
cluding work at the distributor level, 
through liaison with music publishers, 
the AF of M, NARM and legislative de- 
terrents. 

RIAA’s Henry Brief, at a press 
meeting last week pointed out the prob- 
lem that currently exist in stopping pi- 
rates whose product is the duplication 
of recorded works (as opposed to count- 
erfeiters who duplicate not only sound, 
but also the packaging, logos and copy- 
right information on unauthorized re- 
cordings) . The primary difficulty is 
apprehending the pirate, but even 
beyond this the current legislation is 
sketchy and uneven through the country 
making prosecution of an offender a 
difficult process. Then, the penalties 
are not generally heavy enough to 
dissuade piracy. 

The first area in which RIAA is 
pressing for aid in fighting piracy is at 
the distributor level. In order to stop 
the manufacture of pirated tapes, 
Brief noted, the distributor has been 
proving extremely valuable, since he 
has made it possible to locate pirate 
operations immediately upon approach 
to sell them. Distributors are also able 
to identify individuals frequently, al- 
lowing rapid stoppage of pirated tapes 
and quick legal action against offend- 
ers. 


Brief also noted that the criminal of- 
fense involving pirated tapes includes 
sale as well as manufacture, making 
distributors or retailers as guilty when 
trafficing in illegal tape as the person 
or firm selling the tape to a distribu- 
tor. 

Aid thus far obtained by the RIAA 
has shown the most widely used forms 
of pirated product and the means of op- 
eration used by pirates. The collection 
of hits, including songs from the best 
seller lists of the week are becoming 
the major example of pirate trade. In 
several mail-order cases, the pirate 
has been sending copies of local or na- 
tional best seller lists with a state- 
ment that he could make to order a 
cartridge tape with any titles shown. 

In this manner, the illegal tape du- 
plication is not only faster than the le- 
gal possession of the songs on the 
chart, but also able to compile collec- 
tions disregarding label affiliation of 
artists. 

Publisher Pressure 

One of the most fruitful areas tapped 
by RIAA in prosecuting pirates has 
been through the publishing vein. Since 
the only national legislation that can be 
pressed on a uniform basis is the copy- 
right laws protecting music publishing. 

Publishers owning copyrights have a 
legal statute enabling prosecution for 
infringement rights. With the mount- 
ing of RIAA’s drive against piracy. 
Brief stated that the RIAA has effected 
an even closer bond with publishers to 
assist in battling the tape violators. 

Several of the pirates who have been 
hit through the copyright 

(Con't. on Page 24) 


music category, and will report to 
Jenkins. 

Laginestra said each of the exec- 
utives would supervise the activities 
of personnel assigned for the purpose 
of conceiving, creating and merchan- 
dising the product so that the mer- 
chandising will meet the specific 
needs of the particular product in- 
volved. He added: “Each of these 
men will specialize in his own par- 
ticular market to the extent that the 
albums released fit a need of that 
market. In many instances, he will 
have to find new ways of producing, 
promoting and marketing his product 
also.” 


The Philosophy 

In explaining the new concept, 
Racusin pointed out that “no textbook 
organization chart of solid lines and 
boxes can adequately describe this 
operating technique since it involves 
(Con’t. on Page 38) 


Levy: Roulette 
At Sales Peak 

NEW YORK — Roulette Records is 
enjoying the biggest sales volume in 
its history. 

Morris Levy, president of Roulette, 
feels that 1970 will be the label’s best 
year in history. He cited the product 
responsible for this sales surge: 
“Gotta Get Back to You,” Tommy 
James’ latest single; James’ “The 
Best of Tommy James” LP; advance 
orders on the star’s upcoming “Trav- 
elin’ ” album. Levy also noted Charlie 
Hodges’ “Slip Around” on the Rou- 
lette-handled Calla label and a new 
underground group. Charisma. 


Dunhill Establishes 
New Sales Structure 

HOLLYWOOD — Dunhill Records now 
has a new sales exec structure. Jay 
Lasker, president, reports that Marv 
Heifer, exec director of national sales 
and merchandising, heads the sales 
force with Dennis Laventhal over- 
seeing national sales. Joe Carbone 
will function as east coast sales man- 
ager; Marty Hirsch in the midwest 
and Julie Zimand on the west coast. 
All group sales managers report 
directly to Laventhal, with Heifer 
heading the overall setup. 


Stones’ ‘Silver’ 
Only In ‘Bleed’ 

NEW YORK — The Rolling Stones 
version of “Get the Silver,” while 
heard on the soundtrack of the MGM 
film “Zambriskie Point,” is not avail- 
able on the MGM track LP, as pre- 
viously reported. The session is avail- 
able only through the group’s “Let 
It Bleed ’ LP on London. 


Artie Mogull To 
Capitol As Prod. 


Group Seeks Govt. Bootlegging Laws 


NEW YORK — The continuing de- 
sire and need to end the major boot- 
legging problem that has enveloped 
the music industry with increasing 
severity since the introduction of the 
tape cartridge led a group of industry 
people to meet last week at the home 


MGM Re-Inks, 
Signs C&W Acts 
See C&W Report 


of Scepter Records president, Flor- 
ence Greenberg. 

Sean Downey, who a decade ago had 
hopes for a career in music as a vocal- 
ist, and has since become a represen- 
tative lobbyist for a number of major 
American companies expressing their 
interests and problems among the leg- 
islators in Washington, advised the in- 
dustry group that he believed he could 
assist the record industry in the for- 
mulation of Federal legislation that 
would make it more difficult and dan- 
gerous for tape and record bootleggers 
to engage in their business than is the 
case today. 

(Con't. on Page 38) 


HOLLYWOOD — Former Tetragram- 
maton pre.xy Artie Mogull, has 
joined Capitol Records as an exec 
producer and will be headquartered 
at the label’s Hollywood office. Most 
lecently Mogull had, for a brief span, 
assisted former Warners Records’ 
president, Mike Maitland, and 
formerly represented Warners’ pub- 
lishing arms on the east coast. 


Set 30% Local 
Content Ruling 
For Canada Radio 
See Int'l Section 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


7 







When was the 
last time you a 
a seventh-crrac 


Don't knock it. 

Kasenetz-Katz ' specialized knowledge of 
seventh-grade make-out parties, hot-rod bicycles 
with instrument panels, older brothers with driver's 
licenses and wheels, has paid off. 

It's paid off in million-seller singles like 
the 1910 Fruitgum Company's "Indian Giver," "Simon Says, 
"1,2,3, Red Light," and others. 

It's paid off in million seller singles like 
the Ohio Express's "Yummy, Yummy, Yummy," 

"Chewy, Chewy, " "Mercy, " and others. 

It's paid off in bulletted albums like 
"The Very Best of the Ohio Express" (BDS 5058). 

And "Juiciest Fruitgum" (BDS 5057). 

All of which is a prelude to announcing 
Kasenetz-Katz' latest candidate for the million-seller 
list: " Love Eq uals Love " (BDA-160) by the Ohio Express . 

No make-out party record collection 
is complete without it. 




\mm 

Iwcowos, INC. 



Manufactured by Buddah Records 


Clive Davis: Industry Is Primed For Growth 


Scheer, Maduri Into 
Key Kapp Exec Posts 

HOLLYWOOD — Kapp Records has 
filled in two key posts with the ap- 
pointments of Lenny Scheer as na- 
tional sales manager and Carl Maduri 
as national promotion director. 

According to Kapp general manager 
Johnny Musso, Maduri, most recently 
the mid-West regional promotion man- 
ager for Warners/Reprise, will be 
headquartered at the firm’s new 
Hollywood office, while Scheer, for- 
mer director of marketing, sales and 
distribution for MGM, will be work- 
ing out of New York. The assignments 
follow close on the heels of the recent 
addition of Barry Freeman as West 
Coast sales and promotion manager. 

Scheer entered the field in 1952 with 
TRO (The Richmond Organization) as 
a professional manager at the firm’s 
New York office. He moved to ABC- 
Paramount as singles sales manager 
in 1959, joining MGM three years 
later. 

Maduri’s first industry post was 
with Mercury Records in 1957, as a 
local promo man for the label’s 
Cleveland branch. In 1961, Maduri 
switched to Benart Distributors in 
the same city, where he remained for 
the next four years before joining 
Warners. 



Scheer & Maduri 


‘Jude’ LP: 

3 Mil Advance 

HOLLYWOOD — The next Beatles 
album, now titled “Hey Jude,” has 
been set for release Thursday (26) . 
Capitol, who distribute the Apple la- 
bel, have reported advance album 
orders topping 2 million, with tape 
orders already over the 1 million 
mark. 

“Hey Jude” is a collection of 
Beatles’ singles that have never 
before appeared on a Capitol or Apple 
album. Selections include “Ballad Of 
John And Yoko,” “Revolution,” “Pa- 
perback Writer,” “Lady Madonna,” 
“Don’t Let Me Down,” “Can’t Buy Me 
Love,” “I Should Have Known Bet- 
ter,” “Rain,” “Old Brown Shoe” and 
“Hey Jude.” 

Sebastian To 
Reprise 

HOLLYWOOD — Reprise Records has 
added yet another ‘name’ artist to its 
fast-growing roster with the signing 
of former Lovin’ Spoonful leader 
John Sebastian. Sebastian's first solo 
album, in preparation for over a year, 
“John B, Sebastian," is being rush- 
released. 

Warner Bros, president Mo Ostin, 
who negotiated the signing, called 
Sebastian “one of the major forces in 
the music of the 1960’s, and we expect 
him to continue his influence on the 
music of the 70's.” 

Sebastian, who split with the Spoon- 
ful more than a year ago, has been 
touring as a solo folk artist in recent 
months. 

Hall Joins MGM 
In Coast A&R 

HOLLYWOOD - MGM Records has 
beefed up its West Coast A&R depart- 
ment with the addition of Don Hall, 
former disc jockey for KPPC-FM, 
a local undergrounder. Hall, re- 
porting to Coast A&R topper Michael 
Lloyd, will be involved in production 
and talent signing. Hall began his 
association with MGM when the 
firm’s film parent signed him as 
musical advisor to “Zafoskie Point.” 
He also produced the film’s sound- 
track LP. 


NEW YORK— What is the state of the 
Union . . . record-wise, tape-wise and 
music-wise? Clive Davis, president of 
Columbia Records, in an interview 
with Cash Box shed some interesting 
light on where the music industry is at 
present and where we can expect to 
see it go in the near future. 

“Music is the most vital part of our 
entertainment culture today and keeps 
getting more attention from all the 
communications media. There is far 
greater involvement in music by to- 
day’s young people and there is a 
growing sophistication in the music 
itself. He emphasized that music is no 
longer being written for the purpose 
of making romantics swoon. Music 
today is speaking to a broader audi- 
ence and about a broader audience 
and as a result the industry of re- 
corded music is benefiting from much 
greater acceptance than it could ever 
have imagined just a few years ago.” 

Youth Market Getting Older 

He pointed to the “Blood, Sweat and 
Tears” album which has sold in ex- 
cess of 2,900,000 units including rec- 
ords and tapes) in less than a year 
and the “Bridge Over Troubled Water” 
album and tape of Simon and Gar- 
funkel which in a matter of days is 
approaching the 2,000,000 mark as 
significant barometers of a dynam- 
ically changing market. “When the 
term youth market is used today,” 
said Davis, it is a much different 


NEW YORK — CTI Records has been 
formed as a division of Creed Taylor, 
Inc. 

The label, under the aegis of the 
vet pop-jazz producer, has setup shop 
here as an indie operation, with more 
than 90% of its distrib net already ap- 
pointed. In addition, its first interna- 
tional arrangement has been nego- 
tiated in Japan with King Records 
under a three-year deal. King is 
familiar with Taylor product, since 
the company distributed packages 
produced by Taylor during his 2 V 2 
year association with A&M Records. 

The CTI line is being launched with 
two albums and a single. Former 
Atlantic Records performer flutist 
Hubert Laws bows on CTI with 


HOLLYWOOD— The Chess and GRT 
labels will consolidate sales forces and 
administrative services as a result of 
the opening of Chess’ offices on the 
west coast. Both labels are under the 
corporate umbrella of GRT Corp. 

GRT Records will, for the most 
part, utilize the Chess distribution net- 
work and sales organization, including 
eight regional managers. 

Merchandising, promo, sales, A&R 
and marketing will be initiated 
through Chess’ Chicago headquarters, 
with Chess personnel in Chicago main- 
taining close liaison with staff mem- 
bers in Los Angeles. 

“The purpose of the consolidation is 
to continue our emphasis on product 
and promotion and to provide these 
primary activities with the strongest 
possible sales and merchandising sup- 
port at all levels of distribution," said 
Aland. Bayley, GRT Corp. president. 

“The entry of Chess into the West 
Coast market is most significant,” 
said Richie Salvador, exec vice presi- 
dent of Chess. “There is a vast con- 
temporary music market on the West 
Coast that could easily, if explored 
and tapped successfully, thrust Chess 
into today’s musical direction.” 

This signals the beginning of a full- 
scale program to involve Chess in con- 
temporary, country, underground, rock 
and pop music. It also will direct its 
attention to both motion picture sound- 


youth market than the industry spoke 
about not too long ago.” A while back 
the youth market referred primarily 
to the teen area. Today people in 
their thirties comprise a major por- 
tion of the youth market. Young mar- 
ried people are more greatly involved 
in recorded music and buy records 
long after they’re married, a factor 
that was not the case only a short 
while ago. 

And because of the far more im- 
portant role music is playing in the 
lives of more people, Davis went on, 
music is receiving greater coverage 
in the communications media. Radio 
—AM & FM, national magazines, 
daily news media are giving ever in- 
creasing exposure to this vital art 
form and the people behind its crea- 
tion, and as a result the music’s 
broader acceptance is being acceler- 
ated. 

“In 1969,” Davis continued, “Col- 
umbia Records’ pressing facilities 
produced in the vicinity of 140,000,000 
albums.” (This figure includes what 
Columbia’s Custom pressing operation 
produces for labels other than those 
it owns.) “This total was 15% greater 
than the amount we pressed in 1968. 
And based on the first eight weeks of 
1970 business, we’re 25% ahead of 
1969’s volume.” 

Add to this the growing tape busi- 
ness and you have further evidence of 
the growing acceptance of recorded 
music. “We didn’t jump on the tape 
bandwagon in the same manner many 


“Crying Song,” from which a single, 
“Let It Be,” has been culled. A new- 
comer to the disk scene, “singing 
poet” Kathy McCord, 17-years-old, is 
being introduced with an album 
named after her. Taylor is presently 
recording jazzist Freddie Hubbard. 
Stressing its total indie image, CTI 
will market its own line of tape car- 
tridges (8-track and cassette) simul- 
taneously with LP counterparts. 
Pressing and duplicatiorf are through 
Columbia. They expect to market an 
average of one album a month. 

CTI’s exec staff consists of "Vic 
Chirumbolo, director of sales and 
marketing, and Ray Lawrence, who 
will handle the label’s promo ac- 
tivities west of the Rockies. 


tracks and original Broadway case 
recordings. , 

Marshall Chess, president, and Sal- 
vador, who will spend time on the 
West Coast developing a complete 
music operation, are looking for sales, 
promotion and A&R personnel to base 
in Los Angeles. 

In addition, the label is actively 
searching for new artists and song- 
writers to span all areas of music. 
“We’re trying to enhance our image 
as a complete musical label, not 
merely an R&B and jazz company,” 
said Salvador. 

The company plans to get fully in- 
volved with independent producers 
and will sign independent production 
agreements. 

Chess’ new musical diversification 
and direction was marked by several 
recent moves, including: 

Signing an exclusive distribution 
agreement with Wayne Moss and 
Charlie McCoy, who recently formed 
Pumpkin Records in Nashville to pro- 
duce country music. 

Announcing distribution agreements 
with London-based Head Records and 
Philadelphia-based Gamble-Huff Nep- 
tune Records. 

Operating production-creative cen- 
ters in Los Angeles, Nashville, Lon- 
don, Philadelphia and Chicago, with a 
base of operations contemplated in 
New York in early 1971. 


others preferred to do in the early 
days Of the advent cartridges. We 
chose a more realistic approach in 
keeping with the evolution of the field 
and today we are one of the industry’s 
largest producers of pre-recorded 
tape.” 

Records Here To Stay 

When asked what ratio of records to 
tapes he forsees for the future he said 
it would be no surprise to see a 50-50 
ratio. “But records are definitely here 
to stay,” he said. He pointed to in- 
creased phonograph sales during the 
past year over the year before as well 
as the figures quoted earlier about 
increasing LP volume last year over 
the one before as factors supporting 
this belief. He also pointed to the in- 
herent cost of an LP as compared to 
the cost of producing a cartridge or 
cassette as a factor that would always 
make the tape form more expensive 
to the consumer. 

He also pointed to such characteris- 
tics as better fidelity of records (at 
present) and the advantage of selec- 
tivity on records as two further rea- 
sons responsible for keeping people 
interested in disks. But he expects 
both the record and tape fields to 
make major strides over the coming 
years. 

The boundaries of the record indus- 
try are limitless, David concluded. 
Columbia, through the years has had 
LP’s which have reached the three 
million mark. But this was always 
accomplished over a long period of 
years and was a rare exception. The 
fact that one album and tape (Blood, 
Sweat & Tears) can approach 3,000,000 
units in less than a year is seen by 
Davis a good indication of where the 
record industry is headed. 


Alfred Newman Dies 
Upgraded H’wood Music 

HOLLYWOOD — Alfred Newman, 
conductor and scorer of 300 Hollywood 
films, of which eight won Academy 
Awards, died here last week (17) of 
emphysema at Cedars of Lebanon 
Hospital. He was 68. A Hollywood 
composer since 1930, Newman is 
credited with greatly enhancing the 
art of film music as a device to set 
the mood of the entire film rather than 
just certain scenes. 

His Academy Awards for back- 
ground scores include “The Song of 
Bernadette,” 1943; “Love is a Many- 
Splendored Thing,” 1955; “Alex- 
ander’s Ragtime Band,” 1938; “Tin 
Pan Alley,” 1940; “Mother Wore 
Tights,” 1947; “With a Song in My 
Heart,” 1952; “Call Me Madam.” 
1953; “The King & I, ” 1956. His other 
film credits include “Camelot ” and 
“Carousel.” His last effort was the 
scoring of “Airport,” yet to be re- 
leased. 

Born in New Haven on March 7, 
1901, Newman began the study of the 
piano at the age of 7, making his first 
public appearance when he was 8. In 
1911, his family moved to New York, 
where he later studied piano and com- 
position with Sigismond Stojowski and 
Paderewski, Rubin Goldmark and 
George Wedge. In Hollywood, he was 
a pupil of Arnold Schoenberg, When 
he was 16, he was musical director of 
the first George White “Scandals” and 
before moving on to Hollywood, he 
conducted some Gershwin shows. 

.A music director for UA, Sam Gold- 
wyn and 20th Century Fox, Newman 
composed the music for such films as 
“City Lights,” ’’Dead End, ” "The 
.Adventures of Marco Polo,” “Wuther- 
ing Heights,” "The Blue Bird” and 
“How Green Was My Valley.” In ad- 
dition to his Hollywood work, Newman 
was a guest conductor of the Cincin- 
nati Symphony, National Symphony. 
Los Angeles Philharmonic and Holly- 
wood Bowl Orchestra and the .Amer- 
ican Orchestral Society of New York. 
He joined ASCAP in 1938, 

Survix'ing Newman are his widow, 
Martha Montgomery, an actress and 
his third wife; seven children, three 
sisters and six brothers. 


Creed Taylor Forms CTI Label, 
Operation Sets Indie Status 


(Con't. on Page 38) 

GRT Records Merges With Chess 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


9 



ABC Nixes Long-Termers, Move 
To West Coast Is Paying Off 


Third World Prod. 

Black Artists 

MILWAUKEE — Establishment of 
offices in New York and St. Croix, 
J.S. Virgin Islands, as well as Mil- 
waukee, has been announced by Will 
Crittenden, president of Third World 
Productions, Ltd., incorporated early 
this year to develop new musical 
talent by providing undiscovered mu- 
sicians with opportunities to make 
records and personal appearances. 
The emphasis is on black performers, 
according to Crittenden. 

Crittenden is a composer whose per- 
forming specialty is African per- 
cussion. He has made numerous ap- 
pearances in the Midwest with his 
Afro-American jazz ensemble and was 
for some time director of the Black 
Arts Theater, a project of Milwaukee’s 
Inner City Arts Council. 

The corporation is an outgrowth of 
various recording and booking enter- 
prises which Crittendon has headed 
during the past several years. Among 
his released recordings are an LP 
instrumental album “Message from 
the Third World’’ and a vocal fea- 
turing the Milwaukee Afroettes. 

Crittendon also announced the ap- 
pointment of Bobby T. Jenkins, Mil- 
waukee, as executive vice president of 
Third World Productions. Jenkins has 
been a sales representative of the 
John Hancock Life Insurance Com- 
pany and United States Surgical Corp. 

Two leading jazz musicians, Ray- 
mond Johnson of New York City and 
Berkley Fudge of Milwaukee, have 
been named board members, music 
directors and regional representatives 
of Third World Productions. Johnson 
lived in Milwaukee in the early six- 
ties when he played the piano for the 
late Dick Ruedebusch’s jazz group: 
he is a composer and arranger. 

Crittendon said that Third World 
Productions is working with singers 
and musicians in Michigan, New 
York, Chicago and Trinidad — in the 
latter a group discovered by him 
during a talent search in the Carib- 
bean late last year. 

Crittendon said that his company is 
currently concentrating on several 
records that will feature a “new 
sound’’ blending Afro-American, 
classic jazz and the rock idiom. He 
expects finishing touches to be com- 
pleted at a New York recording studio 
within a week. He is presently in New 
York conferring and rehearsing with 
Mr. Johnson. 

Crittendon is also president of NaWil 
music publishing company, which 
publishes musical works by artists af- 
filiated with Third World Productions 
and by other composers. 

Legal counsel for the firm is Hayes, 
Peck and Gerlach of Milwaukee. Pub- 
lic relations counsel is George Richard 
Associates, also of Milwaukee. 


3 Form Service In 
Promo & Marketing 

CHICAGO — A new service, National 
Promotion & Marketing Corp. (NPM, 
Inc.), has been formed here by John 
Knoble, Tom Gelardi and Dan Des- 
mond. The organization will provide 
its services through all levels of the 
business on a nationwide basis. 

At the moment, notes Knoble who 
along with Desmond was previously 
associated with Capitol Records, all 
key and secondary markets in the 
midwest and south are being covered, 
with the company eyeing the east 
and west after it establishes a “track 
record.” 

Knoble, based at NPM’s headquar- 
ters at 2500 Windsor Mall in Park- 
ridge, 111., will cover Chicago, Minne- 
apolis, Milwaukee, Dayton, Columbus, 
Cincinnati; Gelardi, located out of 
Detroit, will cover Detroit, Cleveland, 
Pittsburgh and Buffalo; Desmond, 
working out of Atlanta, will handle 
Atlanta, Kansas City, St. Louis, Nash- 
ville, Memphis and Dallas. Desmond 
comes to the setup after promo and 
sales functions for Amos Heilicher’s 
rack operation in St. Louis. 

NPM, Inc. is to offer weekly reports 
to its clients; an artists relations and 
marketing service; and a general 
follow-through from airplay to distrib- 
rack-one-stop to retailer. 


HOLLYWOOD — The trend towards 
long-term indie production deals may 
be nearing an end, with the first blow 
struck by ABC Records, which has 
abrogated all its long-term commit- 
ments. "It's very conceivable that a 
producer may come to us with five 
albums,” said Howard Stark, vice 
president and general manager of 
the ABC group,” and there may be 
three hit artists in there, but we’re 
not wise enough to handle more than 
one hit artist from a producer at a 
time and we’re not rich enough to 
support them,” 

The move towards deals on a pack- 
age-to-package basis is part of an 
overall new selectivity that has helped 
ABC wind up its first six months on 
the West Coast with three current hit 
singles, two gold records and several 
successful albums. “We feel there’s 
more profit in working one artist at 
a time than throwing out 50 records 
and hoping one sticks,” noted Otis 
Smith, vice president in charge of 
sales and promotion for ABC, Blues- 
way, Impulse and the ABC-distributed 
20th Century Fox label. 

Smith emphasized that “though we 
want hit records, our real goal is to 
establish and build acts,” and pointed 
to the results of the label’s total cam- 
paigns on B. B. King, Tommy Roe, 
the James Gang, Eddie Holman and 
the Blues Magoos, 

The label is still actively involved 
with indie producers, with current 
deals with Bob Wyld for the Blues 
Magoos; Pete De Angelis for Eddie 
Holman; Tom Wilson for current 

Carl Davis Is 
Brunswick V.P. 

NEW YORK — Nat Tarnopol, exec 
vice president of Brunswick Records 
has named Carl Davis vice president. 
Davis' appointment was approved at 
the last Board of Directors meeting 
held in New York City last month. 

Davis was originally appointed to 
Brunswick by Tarnopol in 1967 as an 
independent producer. His success 
with hit product lead to his appoint- 
ment as director of A&R for Bruns- 
wick a year later. 

Davis has introduced such artists as 
Barbara Acklin, Young Holt Unlim- 
ited, Chi-Lites and the Artistics to 
name a few. He also supervised the 
recordings of Jackie Wilson and Gene 
Chandler. 

His new appointment comes in the 
midst of increased disk activities on 
Brunswick: “24 Hours of Sadness” by 
the Chi-Lites, “Funky Chicken” by 
Willie Henderson, “Just Another 
Heartache” by the Artistics and 
“Someone Else’s Arms” by Barbara 
Acklin. 

Davis will continue to work out of 
Brunswick’s Chicago office at 1449 
S. Michigan Avenue, and will report 
directly to Tarnopol in New York. 

E.B. Marks Names 
Murray Baker GPM 

NEW YORK — Murray Baker has 
been named general professional man- 
ager of Edward B. Marks Music 
Corp., reports Herbert E. Marks, 
president. 

The vet music man comes to Marks 
from Roosevelt Screen Gems Music 
Corp., where he served as professional 
manager. Prior to this association, 
Baker served with the Big Three Mu- 
sic Corporation many years. 

Baker was one of the founders, in 
1943, of Burke and Van Heusen Music, 
of which Bing Crosby was a partner. 

Baker will immediately work on the 
promo and exploitation of the score 
of the new Oscar Brown Jr. show 
“Joy,” which opened recently at the 
New Theatre to rave reviews by the 
critics. The original cast album of 
the show is released by RCA Records. 

“While I will continue to push these 
active standards, I will also launch 
an aggressive campaign to acquire 
more contemporary material and 
follow an open-door policy,” Baker 
said. “I aim to keep Marks Music 
very much in the 'now’ scene.” 


Motown producer/writer Nick Ash- 
ford, who’s just joined the label as 
an artist; and Bob Todd for the 
Country Coalition. In addition, ABC 
carries two staff producers, Bill 
Szymczyk, who cuts B. B. King and 
the James Gang; and Ed Michelle, 
who produces most of the Impulse 
artists. 

King is currently enjoying his 
biggest Top 100 success with “The 
Thrill Is Gone,” as well as a chart 
album, “Completely Well,” while Roe 
has just racked up his fourth RIAA 
gold disk for “Jam Up & Jelly Tight” 
and has entered the charts again with 
“Stir It Up & Serve It.” Holman is 
also enjoying his biggest single with 
“Hey There Lonely Girl,” while the 
James Gang is coming off a hit debut 
album, “Yer Album.” The label’s 
current campaign is centered around 
the return of the Blues Magoos, whose 
first album for ABC is off to heavy 
sales. 

Promo Concentration 

In addition to Smith, ABC has four 
national promotion men: Marvin 
Deane, handling ABC; George Morris, 
handling R&B product for all labels; 
Lew Stewart, handling Bluesway & 
Impulse; and Moe Preskell, handling 
special projects. Despite the abun- 
dance of promo staffers, the label is 
following a ‘quality not quantity’ for- 
mula. “You won’t see us coming out 
with 15 records at a time,” said Smith. 
“With four promotion men, figuring 
three records per man, we could 
handle 12 records at a time, but 12 is 
the same as 50. If you have four rec- 
ords you believe in, you have a lot of 
records. Since we’ve moved to the 
Coast, we’ve only put out about eight 
records, and scored big with four of 
them. To kick off, “Jam Up & Jelly 
Tight,” all four men, plus Howard 
and myself, worked the record. 
When it happened, reached 30 with 
a bullet and was selling 50,000 a day, 
I worked it myself, freeing the other 
men to start on another record.” 

“What we’re trying to do is estab- 
lish a foundation, letting people know 
about ABC and our artists. We’re 
working our publicity and promotion 
out well in advance of release and 
have retained the Jay Bernstein 
office to coordinate our P.R. 

King’s On The Way 

“We’ve established B. B. King, not 
to the point where we want to estab- 
lish him, nor to the point where he will 
be established soon, but to the point 
where everbody knows, black or 
white, that B. B. King is here. The 
kids in the streets know who B. B. is, 
but when you call Mr. Distributor, or 
Mr. Rack and say 'put this LP out,’ 
they say “B. B. King? Nobody buys 
B. B. King, we ll put it into our black 
stores,” not knowing that everytime 
B. B. appears at the Fillmore East, 
the Whisky, the Fillmore West, the 
Boston Tea Party, 95% of the kids 
grabbing at him, screaming and 
hollering, are white people.” 

Jack Tessler Joins 
Craig Braun, Inc. 

NEW YORK — Jack Tessler has been 
named director of sales and marketing 
at Craig Braun, Inc., an agency offer- 
ing ad promo-merchandising services 
for the record industry. The company’s 
clients include Atlantic, Bell, Chess, 
Columbia, Elektra, London, Metro- 
media, Motown and RCA. 

Tessler will be responsible for both 
client contact and new-business devel- 
opment and will operate on behalf of 
both the parent company and Sound 
Packaging Corporation, a subsidiary 
which designs and produces custom 
record packages. 

Tessler has held positions in the 
music industry as international pro-mo 
and merchandising manager of CBS 
Records and exec administrator of 
Mills Music. His advertising back- 
ground includes positions as account 
exec at Wunderman, Ricotta and Kline 
and senior account exec at Grey Ad- 
vertising on RCA Records. 


Oscar Nominations, 
Repeats Abounding 

HOLLYWOOD — Musical nominees 
for this yeaPs Oscars include a num- 
ber of former Academy winners and 
also rans — Leslie Bricusse (winner 
in '68 with “Talk to the Animals”), 
John Green (multiple Oscar winner). 
Dory Previn (nominated along with 
husband Andre last for “Second 
Chance” from “Two for the Seesaw”), 
Bacharach and David (three time 
nominees), Elmer Bernstein (who 
“scored” in '68 with “Thoroughly 
Modern Millie”), Don Black (winner 
with “Born Free” in ’67) and Michel 
Legrand-Alan and Marilyn Bergman 
(last year’s “best song” Oscar went 
to the trio for “Windmills Of Your 
Mind”), Rod McKuen is one of the 
few first time nominees with “Jean” 
from “The Prime of Miss Jean 
Brodie.” Burt Bacharach is repre- 
sented this year in two musical cate- 
gories — best song and best original 
score (“Raindrops Keep Falling On 
My Head” and “Butch Cassidy and 
the Sundance Kid”). “Cassidy” gar- 
nered seven nominations with “Hello 
Dolly” and “Midnight Cowboy” also 
picking up seven in various cate- 
gories. “Anne of the Thousand Days” 
and “They Shoot Horses, Don’t 
They?” topped the list of nominations 
with 10 and 9 respectively. 

Musical Nominees include; 

Best Original Score — for a motion 
picture (not a musical): 

(for which only the composer shall 
be eligible) 

“Anne Of The Thousand Days”, A Hal 
B. Wallis-Universal Picutres, Ltd. 
Production, Universal. — Georges 
Delerue. 

“Butch Cassidy And The Sundance 
Kid”, Campanile Productions, 20th 
Century-Fox. — Burt Bacharach. 

“The Reivers”, Irving Ravetch- 
Arthur Kramer-Solar Productions, 
Cinema Center Films Presentation, 
National General Pictures. — John 
Williams. 

“The Secret Of Santa "Vittoria”, A 
Stanley Kramer Company Produc- 
tion, United Artists, — Ernest Gold. 
“The Wild Bunch”, A Phil Feldman 
Production, Warner Bros. — Jerry 
Fielding. 

Best Score of a Musical Picture — 
(original or adaptation): 

(for which the composer, lyricist 
and the adapter shall be eligible if 
the music score was written directly 
for the screen, but only the adapter 
shall be eligible if the score is an 
adaptation from another medium) 
“Goodbye, Mr. Chips”, An APJAC 
Production, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 
— Music and lyrics by Leslie Bri- 
cusse. Music adapted by John 
Williams. 

“Hello, Dolly!”, Chenault Produc- 
tions, 20th Century-Fox. — Music 
adapted by Lennie Hayton and 
Lionel Newman. 

“Paint Your Wagon”, An Alan Jay 
Lerner Production, Paramount, — 
Music adapted by Nelson Riddle, 
“Sweet Charity”, Universal. — Music 
adapted by Cy Coleman. 

“They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” 
A Chartoff-Winkler-Pollack Produc- 
tion, ABC Pictures Presentation, 
Cinerama. — Music adapted by John 
Green and Albert Woodbury. 

Best song (original for the picture): 
“Come Saturday Morning” from “The 
Sterile Cuckoo”, Boardwalk Produc- 
tions, Paramount. — Music by Fred 
Karlin. Lyrics by Dory Previn. 

“Jean” from “The Prime Of Miss 
Jean Brodie”, 20th Century-Fox 
Productions, Ltd., 20th Century-Fox. 
— Music and lyrics by Rod McKuen. 
“Raindrops Keep Failin’ On My 
Head” from “Butch Cassidy And 
The Sundance Kid”, Campanile Pro- 
ductions, 20th Century-Fox. — Music 
by Burt Bacharach. Lyrics by Hal 
David. 

“True Grit” from “True Grit”, A Hal 
Wallis Production, Paramount. — 
Music by Elmer Bernstein. Lyrics 
by Don Black. 

“What Are You Doing The Rest Of 
Your Life?” from “The Happy End- 
ing”, A Pax Films Production, 
United Artists. — Music by Michel 
Legrand. Lyrics by Alan and 
Marilyn Bergman. 

Oscars will be presented Tuesday, 
April 7 and will be broadcast in color 
by the ABC Television Network. 


10 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 



f 

I 


VUE BIElU'BAn If M A I BIIBA 

IIIC lltn IfUII mullUtll ALDlllfl 


A new record album of 1970-fresh songs by “The Loner” is just out, In considerable beauty. 

It’s a romantic album, to be sure. Which rarity Is nothing to apologize over. 

Rather we listen with pride to the poet's voice, set amid the symphony-sized accompaniments of arranger- 
conductor Don Costa. 

If yoQ have not yet entered the warming experience of Rod icKuen, we urge on you that delight. 

If you have known Rod McKuen, you undoubtedly have started already toward your local record (or tape) 
store. 

That, because New Ballads by Rod l^cKuen, is a new kind of loving. 

Rod HScKuen's New Ballads Are on Warner Bros. Records Where Love's for Sale. 





FRIEND AND LOVER 


CADET CONCEPT 7019 


THE DELLS 

OH, 

WHAT A 
DAT 

CADET 5663 


ETTA JAMES 



CADET 5664 


LITTLE MILTON 

IF WALLS 
COULD 
TALK 


CHECKER 1226 



Cash Box Radio Active 


A survey of key radio stations in all important markets throughout the country to determine by percentage of those 
reporting v\/hich releases are being added to station play lists this \Afeek for the first time and also the degree of con- 
centration combining previous reports. Percentage figures on left indicate how many of the stations reporting this 
week have added the following titles to their play list for the first time. Percentage figures on right include total 
from left plus the percentage title received in prior week or weeks. 


% OF STATIONS 
ADDING TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 
THIS WEEK 


TITLE 


ARTIST 


TOTAL % OF 

^ STATIONS TO HAVE 
LABEL ADDED TITLES TO 

PROG. SCHED. 

TO DATE 


48% 

Let’s Give Adam & Eve Another Chance — Gary Puckett & Union Gap 

— Columbia 

48% 

48% 

Instant Karma — John Ono Lennon — Apple 

99% 

45% 

Who’s Your Baby — Archies — Kirshner 

45% 

42% 

Love Or Let Me Be Lonely — Friends Of Distinction — RCA 

57% 

35% 

Up The Ladder To The Roof — Supremes — Motown 

35% 

32% 

Stir It Up & Serve It — Tommy Roe — ABC 

69% 

31% 

Spirit In The Sky — Norman Greenbaum — Reprise 

82% 

29% 

Reflections Of My Life — Marmalade — London 

56% 

27% 

Silly Silly Fool — Dusty Springfield — Atlantic 

35% 

25% 

Ticket To Ride — Carpenters — A&M 

35% 

23% 

Add Some Music To Your Day — Beach Boys — Warner Bros 

40% 

21% 

Mighty Joe — Shocking Blue — Colossus 

21% 

20% 

Come & Get It — Badfinger — Apple 

97% 

19% 

Call Me — Aretha Franklin — Atlantic 

87% 

16% 

Nothing Succeeds Like Success — Bill Deal — Heritage 

16% 

15% 

Peter & The Wolf — Charles Randolph Grean — Ranwood 

15% 

14% 

Time To Get It — Country Coalition — ABC 

14% 

12% 

Long Lonesome Highway — Michael Parks — MGM 

12% 

11% 

Come Together — Ike & Tina Turner — Minit 

11% 

10% 

Gotta Get Back To You — Tommy James & Shondells — Roulette 

61% 

10% 

Rag Mama Rag — Band — Capitol 

18% 

10% 

Temma Harbour — Mary Hopkin — Apple 

39% 

10% 

Shilo — Neil Diamond — Bang 

34% 

10% 

You Keep Tightening Up On Me — Box Tops — Mala 

10% 


LESS THAN 10% BUT MORE THAN 5% 


TOTAL % TO DATE 


Until It’s Time For You To Go — 

Neil Diamond — Uni 40% 


Don’t Worry Baby — 
■^kens — Buddah 

CatWalk — Villiage Soul 
Choir — Abbott 


29% 

9% 


You’re The One — Little 
Sister— Stone Flower 20% 

Easy To Be Free — Rick 
Nelson — Decca 20% 

Rhymes & Reasons — 

Irish Rovers — Decca 8% 


Mississippi Mama — 

Owen B — Janus 29% 

Morrison Hotel (LP) — Jim 
Morrison — Elecktra 8% 

Come Into My Life — 

Jimmy Cliff — A&M 8% 


12 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


BRIGHTON HILL#66438 
JACKIE De SHANNON 

JL beautiful new single, written and sung 
by Jackie TDeShannon, one of the world's 
beautiful people. Listen to "Brighton Hill"... 
you'll feel beautiful too. 

Wriiten by Jackie TDeShanmn- Jimmy Holiday -Randy JVlyers 

Troduced by iSam Russell Irvin Muni 

JL VTvtC RroducHon 

Jir ranged by Rene Hall 8^ Sam Russell 

*Thank you HJLRJLS for your Grammy nomination. 

(Rest Contemporary Remale Vocal Rerformance for 
"Tut JL Little Love In Your Heart") 



IMPERIAL 


Looking Ahead 


1 DON’T WORRY BABY 

(Irving — BMI) 

The Tokens (Buddah 159) 

2 LOVE OR LET ME 
BE LONELY 

(Black Artists Pub — BMI) 

Friends of Distinction (RCA 74-0319) 

3 GONNA GIVE HER ALL THE 
LOVE I’VE GOT 

(Jobete — BMI) 

Marvin Gaye (Tamla 64190) 

4 JUST ABOUT THE SAME 

(Mee-Moo — BMI) 

The Association (W.B,/7 Arts 7372) 

5 24 HOURS OF SADNESS 

(Dakar, BRC - BMI) 

Chi-Lites (Brunswick 755426) 

6 SHE’S READY 

(Algee-BMI) 

Spiral Starecase (Columbia 45048) 

7 THIS EMPTY PLACE 

Blue Seas (U. S. Songs — ASCAP) 
Tangiers (Scepter 12269) 

8 TENDER WAS THE LOVE 
WE KNEW 

Intruders (Gamble 4001) 

9 IN & OUT OF LOVE 

(Cinco-BMI) 

Bobby Vee (Liberty 56149) 

10 THEFIGHTIN’SIDEOFME 

(Blue Book — BMI) 

Merle Haggard (Capitol 2719) 

11 HOLLY GO SOFTLY 

Cornerstone (Liberty 56149) 


12 

WAN-TU-WAH-ZUREE 

23 

BUFFALO SOLDIER 


(Double Diamond — BMI) 


(Shelby Singleton/Hip Hill — BMI) 


George Tindley (Wand 11215) 


Flamingos (Polydor 14019) 

13 

MY WOMAN MY WOMAN, 

24 

TRY (JUST A LITTLE BIT 


MY WIFE 


HARDER) 


(Mariposa — BMI) 


(Ragmer — BMI) 


Marty Robbins (Columbia 45091) 


Janis Joplin (Columbia 45080) 

14 

DIANE 

25 

WON’T FIND BETTER 


(Magic Fleet/Bates — BMI) 


(Dandelion — BMI) 


The Golden Gate (Audio Fidelity 1611 


New Hope (Jamie 1381) 

15 

FREE AS THE WIND 

26 

1 GOTTA THING 


(Kaskat — BMI) 

Brooklyn Bridge (Buddah 162) 


(Bridgeport — BMI) 

The Funkedelics (Westbound 158) 

16 

TIME 

27 

YOU KEEP TIGHTENING 


(Jobete — BMI) 

Edwin Star (Gordy 7097) 


UPON ME 

(Ear) Barton Music — BMI) 

Box Tops (Bell 865) 

17 

EASY TO BE FREE 

(Hilliard— BMI) 

Rick Nelson (Decca 732639) 

28 

I’LL BE YOUR BABY 

TONIGHT 

18 

PETERS* THE WOLF 


(Dwarf - ASCAP) 

Ray Stephens (Monument 1 187) 


(Screen Gems/Columbia — BMI) 

Charles Randolph Grean Sounde 
(Ranwood 864) 

29 

YOU’VE MADE ME 


SO VERY HAPPY 

19 

YOU SAY IT 


(Jobete - BMI) 

(Jec- BMI) 

Al Green (Hi 2172) 


Lou Rawls (Capitol 2734) 




30 

ROSIANNA 

20 

CHURCH STREET SOUL 


(Blendingwell — ASCAP) 

REVIVAL 


The Buchanan Brothers (Event 3309) 


(Big Seven — BMI) 

The Exiles (Columbia 44972) 

31 

GAMES PEOPLE PLAY 

(Lowery — BMI) 

21 

NIGHT OWL 


Della Reese (Avco-Embassy 4515) 


(Venice— BMI) 

Bad Habits (Paula 327) 

32 

YOU 

(Unart/Joachim — BMI) 

22 

TIGHTEN UP YOUR 

OWN THING 

(ARC/Frepea — BMI) 

33 

Andy Kim (Steed 723) 

MAYBE SO, MAYBE NO 


Etta James (Cadet 5664) 


Holidays (Soul Hawk 1008) 


34 OH WHAT A TIME 

(ARC Music - BMI) 

Maurice & Mac (Checker 1224) 

35 MUSIC TO MY HEART 

(Pocket Full of Tunes/Jillbern/MRC — BMI) 
The Obsession (Happy Tiger 531) 

36 FOR THE LOVE OF HIM 

(Teeger ASCAP) 

Bobbie Martin (United Artists 50602) 

37 NORWEGIAN WOOD 

(Maclen — BMI) 

Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 (A&M 1164) 

38 CALL ME NUMBER ONE 

(Noma - BMI) 

Tremeloes (Epic 10548) 

39 TWO LITTLE BOYS 

(Francis, Day, Hunter — ASCAP) 

Rolf Harris (MGM 14103) 

40 NEVER GOIN’ BACK 
TO GEORGIA 

(Cordon — BMI) 

Blues Magoos (ABC 11250) 

41 CRAZY ANNIE 

(Blackwood — BMI) 

Evie Sands (A&M 1157) 


42 KOOLIT 

(Stephayne Music/Delightful 
Music — BMI) 

Kool & The Gang (Delite 525) 


43 TIME TO GET IT TOGETHER 

(Pequod/E.P.L- ASCAP) 

Country Coalition (Bluesway 61034) 


44 LOVE EQUALS LOVE 

(Peer Int'l — BMI) 

Ohio Express (Buddah 160) 


Star Of Hair 


Robin NcNamara 

is Jeff Barry’s latest discovery . . . 


He lays it on heavy vYith his first new single 
for Steed Records . . . 

Lay a LMtIe Lovin’ 




STEED 


Robin McNamara is a star of today 
and a super star of tomorrow . . . 


Steed Records, distributed nationally by Paramount Records, 

A Division of Famous Music Corporation, a Gulf+Western Company 



14 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 




PERSONAL MANAGEMENT; MANUEL GREENHILL, FOLKLORE PRODUCTIONS, 176 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON, MASS, 


“i -.I 

■ • V-,--' 


a 'iKjS' 




McircN 1970 




te 


JOAN BAEZ’S NEW ALBUM-ONE DAY AT A TIME 

VRS-79310— AVAILABLE FROM YOUR VANGUARD RECORD DISTRIBUTOR IN ALL TAPE CONFIGURATIONS, 8 TRACK 8VM-79310, CASSETTE CVX-79310. 



Statistics 


DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


•New To The Top 100 
#1 

BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER (4:55) 
Simon & Garfunkel-Columbia 45079 

51 W. 52nd St., NYC. 

PROD: Simon, Garfunkel & Halee 
PUB: Charing Cross-BMI 
114 E. 55 St., NYC, 

WRITER: P. Simon 

FLIP: Keep The Customer Satisfied 


#2 

HEY THERE LONELY GIRL (3:01) 

Eddie Holman-ABC 11240 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Peter De Angelis c/o ABC 
PUB: Famous ASCAP 6290 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 
WRITERS: E. Shuman-L. Carr ARR: P. De Angelis 
FLIP: It’s All In The Game 


#3 

THANK YOU (4:47) 

Sly & Family Stone-Epic 10555 

51 West 52 St. NYC. 

PROD: Sly Stone For Stone Flower 
700 Urbano St. San Fran. Calif. 
PUB: Stone BMI (same address) 
WRITER: S. Stewart 
FLIP: Everybody Is A Star 


#4 

NO TIME (3:44) 

Guess Who-RCA 0300 

1133 Ave of the Americas. NYC. 

PROD: Nimbus 9-Jack Richardson 
PUB: Dunbar BMI 1650 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: Bachman-Cummings FLIP: Proper Stranger 


#5 

PSYCHEDELIC SHACK (3:53) 
Temptations-Gordy 7096 

2457 Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich. 
PROD: Norman Whitfield c/o Gordy 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: N. Whitfield-D. Strong 
FLIP: That's The Way Love Is 


#6 

RAINY NIGHT IN GEORGIA (3:29) 

Brook Benton-Cotillion 44057 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD; Arif Mardin c/o Cotillion 
PUB: Combine BMI 530 W Main St. 
Hendersonville, Tenn. 

WRITER: Tony Joe White ARR: A. Mardin 
FLIP: Where Do I Go From Here 


#7 

TRAVELING BAND (2:05) 

Creedence Clearwater Revival-Fantasy 637 

1281 30 St , Oakland, Cahf. 

PROD: John Fogerty c/o Fantasy 

PUB: Jondora-BMI c/o Fantasy 

WRITERS: John Fogerty 

ARR: John Fogerty FLIP: Who'll Stop The Rain 


#8 

VENUS (3:05) 

Shocking Blue-Colossus 108 

1855 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Robert van Leeuwen c/o Colossus 
PUB: Skinny Zach ASCAP 
162 W 56 St. NYC. 

WRITER: Robert van Leeuwen FLIP: Hot Sand 


#9 

RAINDROPS KEEP FALLIN' ON MY HEAD (3:02) 
B.J. Thomas-Scepter 12265 

254 West 54 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Burt Bacharach-Hal David 
c/oFred EAhlertJr. 15 E 48 St. NYC. 

PUB: Blue Seas ASCAP/Jac ASCAP/20th Century 
A5rAP 

c/o Fred EAhlertJr. 

WRITERS: Burt Bacharach-Hal David 
ARR: Burt Bacharach 
FLIP: Never Had It So Good 


#10 

MA BELLE AMIE (3:10) 

Tee Set-Colossus 107 

1855 Bway, NYC, 

PROD: T.S.R. for Jerry Ross (same address) 
PUB; Legacy BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: H. Van Eijck-P. Tetteroo 
FLIP; Angels Coming In The Holy Night 


#11 

HONEY COME BACK (3:00) 

Glen Campbell-Capitol 2718 

1750 N Vine, L.A, Calif. 

PROD: Al De Lory c/o Capitol 
PUB: BMI (pending) 

WRITER; Jimmy Webb 

ARR: Al De Lory FLIP: Where Do You Go 


#12 

WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES (2:42) 

Joe South-Capitol 2704 

1750 N Vine, L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Joe South c/o Capitol 

PUB: Lowery BMI P.O. Box 9687 Atlanta, Ga. 

WRITER: J. South FLIP: Shelter 


#13 

RAPPER (2:42) 

Jaggerz-Kama Sutra 502 

1650 B'way, NYC 
PROD: Sixuvus c/o Kama Sutra 
PUB: Sixuvus Revival/Kama Sutra-BMI 
WRITERS: D. lerace FLIP: Born Poor 


#14 

WHO’LL STOP THE RAIN (2:24) 

Creedence Clearwater Revival-Fantasy 637 

1281 30 St., Oakland, Calif. 

PROD: John Fogarty c/o Fantasy 
PUB: Jondora-BMI c/o Fantasy 
WRITER: John Fogerty 
ARR: John Fogerty FLIP: Travel Band 


#15 

THE THRILL IS GONE (3:53) 

B.B. King-Bluesway 61032 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD; Bill Szymczyk c/o Bluesway 
PUB: Feist-Grosvenor ASCAP 
1350 6th Ave. NYC 

WRITERS: Arthur H. Benson-Dale Pettite 
ARR: Bert DeCoteaux FLIP: You're Mean 


#16 

ARIZONA (3:06) 

Mark Lindsay-Columbia 45037 

51 W 52 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Fuller c/o Columbia 
PUB: Kangaroo BMI 225 E 63 St. NYC. 
WRITER; Kenny Young ARR: Artie Butler 
FLIP: Man From Houston 


#17 

I WANT YOU BACK (2:44) 

Jackson 5-Motown 1157 

2457 Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: The Corporation c/o Motown 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: The Corporation ARR: The Corporation 
FLIP: Who’s Lovin' You 


#18 

EVIL WAYS (2:35) 
Santana-Columbia 45069 

51 W. 52nd St., NYC. 

PROD: Brent Dangerfield & Santana 
PUB:SAH BMI 
1310 Grant Ave., NYC 
WRITER: Sonny Henry FLIP: Waiting 


#19 

HOUSE OF THE RISING SUN (3:23) 
Frijid Pink-Parrot 341 

539 W. 25 St, NYC 
PROD: M. Valvano 
PUB: Al Gallico-BMI 
101 W. 55 St, NYC 
WRITER; Alan Price 
FLIP: Drivin' Blues 


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#20 

GIVE ME JUST A LITTLE MORE TIME (2:43) 
Chairman Of The Board-Invictus 9074 

1750 N. Vine, Hollywood, Calif 
PROD: Mauri Lathower c/o Invictus 
PUB: Gold Forever-BMI 
2601 Cadillac Tower, Detroit, Mich. 

WRITERS; R. Dunbar, E. Wayne 

FLIP; Since The Days Of Pig Tails & Fairy Tails 


#21 

DIDN'T I (BLOW YOUR MIND THIS TIME) (3:25) 
Delfonics-Philly Groove 161 

c/o Bell Records 1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD; Stan & Bell c/o Nickle Shoe 
PUB: Nickle Shoe BMI 285 S 52 St. Phila, Pa. 
WRITERS: Thom Bell-Wm. Hart ARR: Thom Bell 
FLIP: Down Is Up Up Is Down 


#22 

ALWAYS SOMETHING THERE TO REMIND ME (3:09) 
R.B. Greaves-Atco 6726 

1841 B’way NYC 

PROD: Ahmet Ertegun & Jackson Howe c/o Atlantic 
PUB: Blue Seas/Jac/Ann-Rachel ASCAP 
527 Madison Ave., NYC 
WRITERS; Bacharach-David 
FLIP: Home To Stay 


#23 

KENTUCKY RAIN (3:20) 

Elvis Presley-RCA 9791 

1133 Ave of the Americas, NYC. 

PUB: Elvis Presley BMI 241 W 72 St. NYC. 

SPR BMI 1697 Bway, NYC. 

WRITERS: E. Rabbitt-D. Heard FLIP: My Little Friend 


#24 

HE AIN’T HEAVY, HE’S MY BROTHER (4:20) 
Hollies-Epic 10532 

51 W 52 St. NYC. 

PROD: Ron Richards-Air Productions 

108 Park Street, London W1 England 

PUB: Harrison ASCAP 6290 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

WRITERS: B. Scott-B. Russell 

FLIP: Cos You Like To Love Me 


#25 

I’LL NEVER FALL IN LOVE AGAIN (2:52) 
Dionne Warwick-Scepter 12273 

254 W 54 St. NYC, 

PROD: Burt Bacharach-Hal David 
c/o Fred E Ahlert Jr. 15 E 48 St. NYC. 
PUB: Blue Seas/Jac ASCAP 
c/o Fred E. Ahlert Jr. 

WRITERS: Bacharach-David 

ARR: Bacharach-Larry Wilcox 

FLIP: What The World Needs Now Is Love 


#26 

NEVER HAD A DREAM COME TRUE (2:59) 
Stevie Wonder-Tamla 54191 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Henry Cosby (Tamla) 

PUB: Jobete-BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: Moy, Cosby & Wonder 
ARR: Henry Cosby & Paul Riser 
FLIP: Somebody Knows, Somebody Cares 


#27 

WITHOUT LOVE (There Is Nothing) (3:42) 
Tom Jones-Parrot 40045 

539 W 25 St. NYC. 

PROD: Peter Sullivan for Gordon Mills 
24-25 New Bond St, London Wl England. 
PUB: Tro-Suftolk BMI 10 Col. Circle, NYC. 
WRITER; Small ARR: Charles Blackwell 
FLIP: The Man Who Knows Too Much 


#28 

BABY TAKE ME IN YOUR ARMS (2:43) 
Jefferson-Janus 106 

1700 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: John Schroeder c/o Janus 

PUB: January/Welbeck BMI 25 W 56 St. NYC. 

WRITERS: T, MacAuley-J. MacLeod 

ARR: Lew Warbinton FLIP: I Fell Flat On My Face 


#29 

OH ME, OH MY (I’M A FOOL FOR YOU BABY) (2:45) 
Lulu-Atco 6722 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Wexler-Tom Dowd-Arif Mardin c/o Atco 
PUB: Noo Track ASCAP WRITER: Jim Doris 
FLIP: Sweep Around Your Own Back Door 


#30 

NEW WORLD COMING (2:59) 

Mama Cass-Dunhill 4225 

8255 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, Calif 
PROD: Steve Barri & Joel Sill c/o Dunhill 
PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia-BMI 
711 5th Ave, NYC 

WRITERS: Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil 
ARR: Jimmie Haskell FLIP: Blow Me A Kiss 


#31 

CALL ME (3:16) 

Aretha Franklin-Atlantic 2706 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Jerry Wexler-Tom Dowd-Arif Mardin c/o Atlantic 
PUB; Pundit BMI 

WRITER: Aretha Franklin FLIP: Son Of A Preacher Man 


#32 

BREAKING UP IS HARD TO DO (3:01) 

Lenny Welch-Commonwealth United 3004 

745 5th Ave, NYC. 

PROD: Billy Davis-Helen Miller-Rose Marie McCoy 
1619 Bway, NYC. 

PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia BMI 711 5th Ave, NYC. 
WRITERS: N. Sedaka-H. Greenfield ARR: Charlie Calello 
FLIP: Get Mommy To Come Back Home 


#33 

ITS ANEW DAY (5:45) 

James Brown-King 6292 

1540 Brewster Ave, Cinn. Ohio 
PROD: James Brown (same address) 
PUB: Dynatone BMI (same address) 
FLIP: Georgia On My Mind 


#34 

EASY COME EASY GO (2:43) 

Bobby Sherman-Metromedia 177 

1700 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Jackie Mills 6430 Sunset Blvd. H'wood Cal. 
PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia BMI 711 5th Av. NYC. 
WRITERS: J, Keller-D. Hilderbrand 
ARR: Al Capps FLIP: Sounds Along The Way 


#35 

IF I WERE A CARPENTER (2:57) 

Johnny Cash & June Carter-Columbia 45064 

51 W 52 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Bob Johnston c/o Columbia 
PUB: Faithful BMI 745 5th Ave, NYC. 
WRITER; T. Hardin FLIP: Cause I Love You 


#36 

OH WHAT A DAY (2:46) 

Dells-Cadet 5663 

320 E 21st St. Chicago, III. 

PROD: Bobby M iller c/o Cadet 
PUB: Las G-Round BMI 82 E 59 St. Harvey, III. 
WRITER: Michael McGill ARR: Chas. Stepney 
FLIP: The Change We Go Through For Love 


#37 

WHOLE LOTTA LOVE (5:33) 

Led Zeppelin-Atlantic 2690 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Jimmy Page c/o Atlantic 
PUB: Superhype ASCAP 444 Madison Ave, NYC. 
WRITERS: Jimmy Page-Robert Plant 
John Paul Jones-John Bonhom ' 

FLIP: Living Loving Maid (She's Just A Woman) 


#38 

I’VE GOTTA MAKE YOU LOVE ME (3:10) 
Steam-Mercury 73020 

now. 57St., N.Y.C. 

PROD: Paul Leka c/o Heather 110 W. 57 St, NYC 
PUB: Little Heather/MRC-BMI c/o Mercury 
WRITERS: D. Frashuer, G. Decarlo, P. Leka 
FLIP: One Good Woman 


#39 

WALKING IN THE RAIN (2:49) 

Jay & The Americans-U.A. 50605 

729 7th Ave, NYC, 

PROD: Sandy Yaguda-Thomas Kaye 
forJata 1619 Bway, NYC. 

PUB: Screen Gems/Columbia BMI 711 5th Ave, NYC. 

WRITERS: P. Spector-B. Mann-C. Weil 

ARR: T. Kaye FLIP: (I'd Kill) For The Love Of A Lady 


#40 

LOVE GROWS (2:51) 

Edison Lighthouse-Bell 858 
1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Tony Macaulay c/o Bell 
PUB: January BMI 25 W 56 St. NYC. 
WRITERS: Barry Mason-Tony Macaulay 
ARR: Lou Warburton 
FLIP: Every Lonely Day 


#41 

JENNIFER TOMKINS (1:53) 

Street People-Musicor 1365 

240 West 55 St. NYC. 

PROD: Paul Vance 101 W 55 St. NYC. 
PUB: Moonbeam ASCAP c/o Paul Vance 
WRITERS: Vance-Holmes-Florio 
ARR: Rupert Holmes FLIP: All Night Long 


#42 

MY ELUSIVE DREAMS (3:12) 

Bobby Vinton-Epic 10576 

51W. 52nd St., NYC. 

PROD: Billy Sherrill (Epic) 
PUB:Tree-BMI 

905 16th Ave. So., Nashville, Tenn. 
WRITERS: C. Putnam & B. Sherrill 
ARR: Bill Walker FLIP: Over And Over 


#43 

SOMETHING’S BURNING (4:00) 

Kenny Rogers & The First Edition-Reprise 0888 
4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Jimmy Bowen-Kenny Rogers c/o BnB 
9000 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PUB: BnB BMI (same address) 

WRITER: Mac Davis ARR: Mike Post 
FLIP: Mama's Waiting 


#44 

THE BELLS (2:55) 

Originals-Soul 35069 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
PROD: Marvin Gaye (Soul) 

PUB: Jobete-BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: Gaye, Gaye, Stover & Bristol 
ARR: David Van DePitte 
FLIP: I’ll Wait For You 


#45 

TAKE A LOOK AROUND (2:33) 

Smith-Dunhill 4228 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Joel Sill-Steve Barri c/o Dunhill 
PUB: Truesdale BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: J. Cliburn-J. Carter 
ARR: Jimmie Haskell FLIP: Mojalesky 


#46 

WALKING THROUGH THE COUNTRY (2:59) 
Grass Roots-Dunhill 4227 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Steve Bari c/o Dunhill 
PUB: Malicious Melodies ASCAP 
9031 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

WRITER: Dennis Provisor ARR: Sid Feller 
FLIP: Truck Driving Man 


#47 

IF I NEVER KNEW YOUR NAME (2:15) 
Vic Dana-Liberty 56150 

6920 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Ted Glasser c/o Liberty 
PUB: BMI (pending) 

WRITER: Neil Diamond 

ARR: Al Capps FLIP: Sad Day Song 


#48 

ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM (2:32) 

Glen Campbell-Bobble Gentry-Capitol 2745 

1750 N Vine, L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Al DeLory-Kelly Gordon c/o Capitol 
PUB: House Of Bryant BMI 
530 W Main St. Hendersonville, Tenn. 
WRITER: Boudleaux Bryant ARR: Al DeLory 
FLIP: Less Of Me 


#49 

FANCY (4:01) 

Bobbie Gentry-Capitol 2675 

1750 N Vine L.A. Calif. 

PROD: Rick Hall 603 E Avalon, Muscle Shoals, Ala. 
PUB: Larry Shayne ASCAP 6290 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Cal. 
WRITER: Bobbie Gentry FLIP: Courtyard 


#50 

GOTTA HOLD ON TO THIS FEELING (3:15) 

Jr. Walker & All Stars-Soul 35070 

2457 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PROD: Johnny Bristol c/o ^ul 
PUB: Jobete BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: J. Bristol-P. Sawyer-J. Hinton 
ARR: Willie Shorter 

FLIP: Clinging To The Thought That She's Coming Back 


16 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 



Chess Records has now become the sole U.S. distributor for 
Head Records— an English owned and operated company. $o, it’s only 
reasonable that our new LP releases include two new ones on Head. 



Harvey Matusow’s Jews Harp Band Mighty Baby 


which, as the saying goes, * which is as heavy a group 

you’ll have to hear to believe. as you're likely to hear. 

O 

Coming soon: Heavy Jelly 



CHESS RECORDS, A DIVISION OF G?T CORPORATION 



¥itai Statistics 


DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT TITLES ON THE CASH BOX TOP 100 THIS WEEK 


'New To The Top 100 
#51 

GOTTA GET BACK TO YOU (3:01) 

Tommy James & Shondells-Roulette 7071 

17 W 60 St. NYC. 

PROD: T. James-Bob King 300 W 55 St. NYC. 
PUB: Big Seven BMI c/o Roulette 
WRITERS: T. James-B. King FLIP: Red Rover 


#52 

CELEBRATE (3:02) 

Three Dog Night-Dunhill 4229 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD; Gabriel Mekler c/o Dunhill 
PUB: Commonwealth United BMI 745 5th Ave., NYC. 
WRITERS: A Gordon-G. Bonner 
FLIP; Feeling All Right 


#53 

RAG MAMA RAG (2:59) 

The Band-Capitol 2705 

1750 N. Vine, L.A. Calif. 

PROD: The Band c/o Capitol 
PUB: Canaan ASCAP 75 E. 55 St. NYC. 
WRITERS: J.R. Robertson 
FLIP: The Unfaithful Servant 


#54 

THE TOUCH OF YOU (3:04) 

Brenda & Tabulations-Top & Bottom 401 

e/o Jamie 919 N Broad St. Phila, Pa. 

PROD: Gilda Woods-Brenda & Tabulations 
(same address) 

PUB: Dandelion-One-Eye Soul BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: J. Jones-E. Jackson 

ARR: Sam Reed FLIP: Stop Sneaking Around 


#60 

UNTIL ITS TIME FOR YOU TO GO (3:29) 

Nell Diamond-UNI 55204 

8255 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif., 

PROD; Tom Catalano 

16715 Charmwell Pacific Palisades, Calif. 

PUB: Gypsy Boy ASCAP c/o Harry Fox 110 E 59 St. NYC. 
WRITER: Buffy Sainte-Marie ARR: Lee Holdridge 
FLIP: And The Singer Sings His Song 


#61* 

WHO'S YOUR BABY (2:49) 
Archies-Kirshner 80()3 

655 Madison Ave, NYC. 

PROD: Jeff Barry 729 7 th Ave, NYC. 
PUB: Don Kirshner BMI (same address) 
WRITERS; Andy Kim-Jeff Barry 
FLIP: Senorita Rita 


#62 

DO THE FUNKY CHICKEN (3:15) 

Rufus Thomas-Stax 0059 

926 E. McLemore, Memphis, Tenn. 

PROD: Al Beil & Tom Nixon (Stax) 

PUB: East/Memphis-BMI (same address) 
WRITER: Rufus Thomas 
FLIP: Turn Your Damper Down 


#63 

BADFINGER (2:21) 

Come & Get It-Apple 1815 

1700 Bway 

PROD: Apple, NYC 

PUB: Maclen BMI 1780 Bway, NYC. 

WRITER: Paul McCartney FLIP: Rock Of All Ages 


#55 

WHY SHOULD I CRY (1:59) 

Gentrys-Sun 1108 

c/o SSSI 3106 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, Tenn 
PROD: Gentrys & K. Phillips 
PUB: Knox-BMI 
WRITER:). Hart 


#56 

KEEP ON DOIN' (3:55) 

Isley Bros-T-Neck 914 

c/o Buddah 1650 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: R. lsley-0. Isley-R. Isley c/o Buddah 
PUB: Triple Three BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: R. lsley-0. Kelly Isley-R. Isley 
FLIP: Same Me 


#57 

GOOD GUYS ONLY WIN IN THE MOVIES (2:45) 

Mel & Tim-Bamboo 109 

c/o Scepter 254 W. 54 St. NYC. 

PROD: Gene Chandler 1321 S. Michigan Av. Chi., III. 
PUB: Cachand BMI 1449 S. Michigan Av. Chi., III. 
Patcheal BMI 

WRITERS: J. Thompson-E. Dixon ARR: Sonny Sanders 
FLIP: I Find That I Was Wrong 


#58 

STIR IT UP AND SERVE IT (2:30) 
Tommy Roe-ABC 11258 

8255 Beverly Blvd. L.A. Calif. 
PROD: Steve Bari c/o ABC 
PUB: Low-Twi BMI c/o Bill Lowery 
P.O. Box 9687 Atlanta, Ga. 
WRITERS: T. Roe-F. Weller 
ARR: Jimmi Haskell FLIP: Fire Fly 


#59 

INSTANT KARMA (WE ALL SHINE ON) 

John Ono Lennon-Apple 1818 

1700 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Phil Spector c/o ABKCO Indust. 1700 Bway, NYC. 
PUB: Maclen BMI 1780 Bway, NYC, 

WRITER: John Ono Lennon 
FLIP: Who Has Seen The Wind? 



#64 

YOU GOTMEHUMMIN' 

Cold Blood-San Francisco 60 

c/o Atlantic, 1841 B’way, NYC 
PROD: D. Robinson for Fillmore Corp. 
PUB: Pronto/E. Memphis-BMI 
926 E. McLemore, Memphis, Tenn. 
WRITERS: D. Porter & I. Hayes 
FLIP: If You Will 


#65 

COME TOGETHER (3:45) 

Ike & Tina Turner & Ikettes-Minit 32087 

6920 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD: I. Turner c/o Minit 
PUB: Maclen BMI 1780 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: John Lennon-P. McCartney 
ARR: I. Turner FLIP: Honky Tonk Women 


#66 

THE DECLARATION (4:36) 

5th Dimension-Bell 860 

1776 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Bones Howe 8833 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Cal. 

PUB: Mocart BMI 

5th Star Music BMI 8350 Santa Monica Blvd. L.A. Cal. 
WRITERS: Julius Johnson-Rene DeKnight 
ARR: Alcivar-Holman-Howe 

FLIP: A Change Is Gonna Come/People Got To Be Free 


#67 

TEMMA HARBOUR 
Mary Hopkin-Apple 1816 

1700 Bway, NYC, 

PROD: Micki Most c/o ABKCO Indust. 1700 Bway, NYC. 
PUB: Major Oak ASCAP c/o Kant & Gordon 
9465 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hills, Calif. 

WRITER: Filamore Lincoln 
FLIP: Lontano Dagli Occhi 


#68 

CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE (2:15) 

Al Martino-Capitol 2745 

1750 N Vine, L.A. Calif. 

PROD; Wes Farrell 6430 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Cal. 
PUB: Gladys ASCAP 1619 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: G. Weiss-H. Teretti-L. Creatore 
ARR: Michel Columbia 
FLIP: You Are All The Woman That I Need 


#69 

SPIRIT IN THE SKY (3:57) 

Norman Greenbaum-Reprise 0885 

4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Erik Jacobsen c/o Great Honesty 

PUB: Great Honesty BMI 916 Kearny St. San. Fran. Cal. 

WRITER; N. Greenbaum FLIP; Milk Cow 


#70 

SILLY SILLY FOOL (2:25) 

Dusty Springfield 

Atlantic 2705 
1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Eugene Dozier-Roland Chambers tor Gamble Huff 
250 S Broad St. Phila, Pa. 

PUB: Assorted BMI c/o Gamble Huff 

WRITERS: Gamble-Huff ARR: R. Chambers FLIP: Joe 


WANTED 

MARKETING EXPERT 

Major recording corporation with 
expanded tape duplicating oper- 
ation, needs marketing expert. 
Knowledge of recording & tape 
operations helpful. Salary nego- 
tiable, Company benefits. Send 
Resume or Write: 

Cash Box 
Box 868 

1780 B’way; N.Y.C. 10019 


#71. 

VICTORIA (3:37) 

Kinks-Reprise 0863 

4000 Warner Blvd.. Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Ray Davies 

PUB: Hill & Range-BMI, 1619 Broadway, NYC. 

WRITER; Ray Davies 

ARR: Kinks 

FLIP: Brainwashed 


#72 

SUPERSTAR (4:10) 

Murry Head-Decca 732603 

445 Park Ave, NYC 

PROD: T. Rice & A. L. Webber 

PUB:Leeds-ASCAP 

445 Park Ave. NYC 

WRITER: T. Rice & Al Webber 

ARR; A. L. Webber 

FLIP: Johnn Nineteen Forty One 


#73 

SPARKLE AND SHINE (2:35) 

Clique-White Whale 338 

8961 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 

PROD; Tommy James for Gulf Pacific c/o White Whale 
PUB: Big 7 BMI 17 W 60 St. NYC. 

WRITERS: T. James-R. Cordell-B. King 
FLIP: I’m Alive 


#74 

IF YOU’VE GOT A HEART (2:40) 
Bobby Bland-Duke 458 

2809 Erastus St., Houston, Texas 

PROD; Joe Scott 

PUB: Don-BMI (same address) 

WRITER: D. Malone 

ARR: Joe Scott 

FLIP: Sad Feeling 


#75 

HEARTBREAKER (6:30) 

Grand Funk Railroad-(lapitol 2732 

1750N Vine, H’wood, Calif, 

PUB: BMI 720 5th Ave. NYC. 

WRITER: Mark Earner FLIP: Please Don’t Worry 


#76 

JUST SEVENTEEN (3:49) 

The Raiders-Columbia 45082 

51 W 52 St. NYC. 

PROD: Mark Lindsay 9125 Sunset Blvd. L.A. Calif. 
PUB: Boom BMI 250 N Canon Dr. Bev. Hills, Calif. 
WRITER: M. Lindsay FLIP: Sorceress With Blue Eyes 


#77* 

LETS GIVE ADAM & EVE ANOTHER CHANCE (2:47) 
Gary Puckett & Union Gap-Columbia 45097 

51 West 52 Street, NYC. 

PROD: Dick Glasser 6760 Hill Pk. Dr., LA., Cal. 

PUB: Press BMI 905 16th Ave S., Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITERS: R. West-R. Nainegra 

FLIP: Ernie Freemen FLIP: The Beggar 


#78 

YOU’RE THE ONE (Pt. II) (3:13) 

Little Sister-Stone Flower 9000 

700 Urbano St. San Fran. Calif. 

PROD: Sly Stone for Stone Flower (same address) 
PUB: Stone Flower BMI (same address) 

WRITER: S. Stewart FLIP: You're The One (Pt. I) 


#79 

1984-Spirit (3:18) 

Ode 128 

51 W 52 St. NYC. 

PROD: Spirit 

PUB: Hollenbeck BMI c/o Lou Adler 
WRITER; R. California FLIP: Sweet Stella Baby 


#80 

OH WELL PART 1 (3:32) 

Fleetwood Mac-Warner Bros. 0883 

4000 Warner Blvd. Burbank, Calif. 

PROD: Fleetwood Mac 23 Alberle St. London W1 Eng. 
PUB: Fleetwood Mac BMI (same address) 

WRITER: P. A. Green FLIP: Oh Well Part 11 


#81 

COMIN’ HOME (3:13) 

Delaney & Bonnie & Friends-Atco 6725 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Delaney Bramlett c/o Atlantic 
PUB: Throat BMI 

Delbon BMI 8425 W 3rd St. L.A. Calif. 

Cotillion BMI c/o Atco 

WRITERS: B. Bramlett-E. Clapton FLIP: Groupie 


#82 

MELTING POT (3:50) 

Blue Mink-Philips 40658 

35 E Wacker Dr. Chicago, III. 

PROD; Morgan Music Prod, c/o Philips 
PUB: Maribus BMI 1780 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: R. Cook-R. Greenaway 
FLIP: But Not Forever 


#83* 

LAY LADY LAY (2:54) 

Ferrante & Teicher-U.A. 50646 

729 7th Ave, NYC. 

PROD: By George Butler and 
Exec. Producer Bob Skaaf c/o U.A. 

PUB: Big Skye ASCAP WRITER: Bob Dylan 
ARR: Ferrante & Teicher 
FLIP: The Theme From Z 


#84 

TICKET TO RIDE (3:37) 
Carpenters-A&M 1142 

1416 N La Brea, LA. Calif. 

PROD: Jack Dougherty c/o A&M 
PUB: Maclen BMI 1780 Bway, NYC, 
WRITERS: Lennon-McCartney 
FLIP: Your Wonderful Parade 


#85' 

RUN SALLY RUN (2:23) 

Cuff Links-Decca 32639 

445 Park Ave, NYC, 

PUB: Van Lee ASCAP 101 W 57 St. NYC. 
Emily ASCAP 160 W 73 St. NYC. 
WRITERS: Paul Vance-Lee Pockriss 
ARR: Lee Pockriss FLIP: I Remember 


#86 

BRIGHTON HILL (2:16) 

Jackie DeShannon-Imperial 66438 

6920 Sunset Blvd. L.A, Calif. 

PROD: Sam Russell-Irving Hunt c/o Imperial 
PUB: Unart BMI (same address) 

WRITERS: J. DeShannon-Jimmy Holiday-Brandy Myers 
ARR: Renee Hall-S. Russell 
FLIP: You Can Come To Me 


#87 

I JUST CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE (2:40) 
Andy Williams-Columbia 45094 

51 W 52 St. NYC. 

PROD: D. Glasser c/o Columbia 
PUB: Gladys ASCAP 1619 Bway, NYC. 
WRITERS: G. Weiss-H. Teretti-L. Creator 
ARR: Al Capps FLIP: Sweet Memories 


#88 

MISSISSIPPI MAMA (1:56) 

Owen B-Janus 107 
1700 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Owen B c/o Wes Farrell 39 W 55 St, NYC. 
PUB: Pocket Full Of Tunes BMI c/o Wes Farrell 
WRITER: T. Zinser FLIP: Nowhere To Run 


#89 

WELFARE CADILLAC (3:00) 

Guy Drake-Royal American 1 

806 16th Ave S. Nashville, Tenn. 

PROD: Don Hosea 804 16th Ave S. Nashville, Tenn. 
PUB: Bull Fighter BMI c/o Royal American 
WRITER: G. Drake FLIP: Keep Off My Grass 


#90 

SHILO(3:43) 

Neil Diamond-Bang 575 

1650 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Jeff Barry-Ellie Greenwich 
729 7th Ave., NYC. 

PUB: Tallyrand BMI 729 7th Ave., NYC. 
WRITER: N. Diamond FLIP: La Bamba 


#91' 

CALIFORNIA GIRL (3:39) 

Eddie Floyd-Stax 0060 

926 E. McLemore St. Memphis, Tenn. 

PROD; Booker T. Jones c/o Stax 
PUB: E, Memphis BMI (same address) 
WRITERS: B. T. Jones-E. Floyd FLIP: Wood Man 


#92 

THE GHETTO (Pt. 1) (2:41) 

Donny Hathaway-Atco 6719 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Don Rick 8949 Stoney Island Ave, Chi. III. 
King Curtis c/o Atco 

PUB: Don Pow & Peer BMI 1619 Bway, NYC. 
WRITER: Hathaway-Hutson FLIP: The (jhetto (Pt. 2) 


#93* 

REFLECTIONS OF MY LIFE (3:12) 
Marmalade-London 20058 

539 W 25 St. NYC. 

PROD: The Marmalade c/o Decca Ltd. 

9 Albert Embankment, London SEl, Eng. 

PUB: Walrus BMI 

WRITERS; Campbell-McAleese 

ARR: Keith Mansfield FLIP: Rollin’ My Thing 


#94' 

CAT WALK 

The Village Soul Choir-Abbott 2010 

c/o AA Records 250 W 57 St. NYC. 

PROD: Mike Abbott 350 Cathedral Pky, NYC. 
PUB: Arden BMI 185-01 140 Ave., 

Springfield Gardens, NYC. 

WRITER: Sheila Matthews ARR: Jimmy Oliver 
FLIP: The Country Walk 


#95* 

TAKE IT OFF HIM AND PUT IT ON ME (2:50) 
Clarence Carter-Atlantic 2702 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Rick Hall P.O. Bx 2238 Muscle Shoals, Ala. 

PUB: Fame BMI c/o Rick Hall 

WRITERS: G. Jackson-C. S. Buckens-H. Jones- 

L. Pierce-R. Owens 

FLIP: The Few Troubles I’ve Had 


#96* 

YOU’RE RIGHT, RAY CHARLES (3:34) 

Joe Tex-Dial 4096 

1841 Bway, NYC. 

PROD: Buddy Killen c/o Tree 

PUB: Tree BMI 905 16th Ave S., Nashville, Tenn. 

WRITER: Joe Tex ARR; Eddie Williams 

FLIP: Everything Happens On Time 


#97 

BABY MAKE IT SOON (2:40) 

Flying Machine-Congress 6012 

8255SunsetBlvd, L.A. Calif. 

PROD: J. MacLeod-c/o Congress 
PUB: January BMI 25 W 56 St. NYC. 
WRITERS: Tony McAulay-J. Macleod 
FLIP: There She Goes 


#98' 

DON’T GET CLOSE (3:16) 

Little Anthony & Imperials-U.A. 50625 

729 7th Ave, NYC. 

PROD: Bob Scaaf-George Butler & Little Anthony 
& Imperials 

PUB: Double Diamond BMI 250 S Broad St. Phila, Pa. 
Mured BMI 8008 Rodgers Rd. Elkins Pk, Pa. 

WRITERS: J. D. Akines-J. Belmon ARR: Horace Ott 
FLIP; It’ll Never Be The Same Again 


#99 

TO THE OTHER WOMAN (2:55) 

Doris Duke-Canyon 28 

1242 N Highland, L.A, Calif. 

PROD; Jerry Williams Jr. c/o Canyon 
PUB: J. Williams-No Exit-Wally Roker BMI 
WRITER: J. Williams Jr. ARR: J. Williams Jr. 
FLIP: I Don’t Care Anymore 


# 100 ' 

LONG LONESOME HIGHWAY 
Michael Parks-MGM 11104 

6331 H’wood Blvd, L, A. Calif. 

PROD: James Hendricks c/o MGM 

PUB: Hastings/Rivers BMI 1350 Ave Of Americas, NYC 

WRITER: J. Hendricks FLIP: Mountain Hi 


18 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 





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GashBox Record Reviews 



Picks of the Week 



Picks oi the Week 



THE ARCHIES (Kirshner 5003) 

Who’s Your Baby? (2:49) (Don Kirshner, BMI — Barry, Kim) 

Taking on a heavier helping of blues influence than in earlier sides, the Ar- 
chies add further weight to their teen impact making this new outing a strik- 
ing top forty entry. Good song enhanced by a solidly rhythmic delivery insure 
potent sales activity. Flip: “Senorita Rita” (2:30) (Kirshner, BMI — Barry) 


THESUPREMES (Motown 1162) 

Up the Ladder to the Roof (2:58) (Jobete, BMI — Dimirco) 

Making the personnel changeover smoothly, the Supremes serve up their 
first single without Diana Ross in a manner that assures continued sales power 
for the trio. Soaring ballad with the group's distinctive sound and motor-town 
magic in the backdrop plus an unbelievable finish. Flip: "Bill, When Are You 
Coming Home” (3:20) (Jobete, BMI — Bristol, Sawyer) Also strong. 


THE FRIENDS OF DISTINCTION (RCA 0319) 

Love Or Let Me Be Lonely (3:14) (Porpete, BMI — Scarborough, Peters, Poree) 
Two work hits have established a solid groundwork for this act that is 
now paying off with immediate action on the third single from the Friends. 
Bright rapid-fire vocals in the “Grazing” manner and a splendid ballad are 
woven together on this standout side. Flip: “This Generation” (3:23) (Black 
Artists, BMI — Peay) 


THE BEACH BOYS (Reprise 0894) 

Add Some Music to Your Day (3:39) (Brother, BMI — Wilson, Knott, Love) 
Refreshed with a new label and outlook, the Beach Boys strike up a whole 
new brand of teen excitement tinged with a trace of their old “Good Vibra- 
tions” work sparked with vitality. The sound and initial sales portend a bright 
top forty/FM return and BB era beginning once more. Flip: “Susie Cincinnati” 
(3:04) (Brother, BMI — Jardino) 


THE SHOCKING BLUE (Colossus 111) 

Mighty Joe (3:04) (Skinny Zak, ASCAP — Van Leeuwen) 

Coming off “Venus” with another Dutch market-tested hit, the Shocking 
Blue stir up further excitement with a top forty track and standout vocal pulled 
from their album. Gritty group sound could also bring the side solid response 
on the FM side. Flip: No info available. 


BILLY JOE ROYAL (Columbia 45085) 

Me Without You (2:39) (Low-Sal, BMI — Nix, Gilmore) 

Turning to a ballad livened by the touch of electronics, Billy Joe Royal 
brings back his earlier fire in this follow-up to “Cherry Hill Park.” Potent side 
that will hopefully give Royal a firm grasp on the top forty scene. Flip: “Mama’s 
Song” (2:50) (Low-Sal, BMI — Buie, (jobb) The Classics IV’s team provide 
somewhat faster-paced material here for an added goodie that could gain 
favor too. 


BILL DEAL & THE RHONDELS (Heritage 821) 

Nothing Succeeds Like Success (2:43) (Saturday, BMI — Brown, Bloodworth) 
Softening the team’s sound and polishing its style, Bill Deal and company 
turn over a new leaf which broadens the act’s base of operations to add MOR 
potential to the top forty marketplace already in Deal’s camp. Pretty ma- 
terial with a TJB break and bright entertainment power. Flip: No info included. 


KOOL & THE GANG (De-Lite 525) 

Can’t Stop (2:51) (Stephayne/Delightful, BMI — Redd, Kool & Gang) 

A bit of the Bo Diddley sass underlines this new side from Kool & the Gang, 
giving the team another hard-hitting instrumental for total teen impact. Power- 
ful fare for R&B programming and a track likely to break top forty for the 
Gang once more. Flip: “Kool It” (2:50) (Same credits) 


EVIE SANDS (A&M 1175) 

But You Know I Love You (2:54) (TRO-First Edition, BMI — Settle) 

The tune that turned the First Edition into top tenners serves to give Evie 
Sands that extra punch which should place her in the top forty spotlight once 
again. Exceptional arrangements and her special vocal magnetism turn up a 
winner this time out. Flip: “Maybe Tomorrow” (3:14) (Fox Fanfare, BMI — 
Jones, A&M Bergman) 


TYRONE DAVIS (Dakar 616) 

Turn Back the Hands of Time (2:35) (Dakar/Jardan, BMI — Daniels, Thomp- 
son) 

Softly stated ballad here with the personal effectiveness that has become 
an earmark of Tyrone Davis’ offerings. Working with a superb orchestral back- 
up Davis turns on his charm in a way bound to win explosive responses on 
blues and rock fronts. Flip: No info included. 


THE 5 STAIRSTEPS (Buddah 165) 

Dear Prudence (3:30) (Maclen, BMI — Lennon, McCartney) 

Complete change of style and material bring the 5 Stairsteps into a whole 
new sales outlook with this single. Picking up the Beatles’ song, the team 
straddles the pop as well as blues market with their reading to reach a broad- 
er audience this time out. Flip: No info. 


THE ARTISTICS (Brunswick 755431) 

Just Another Heartache (2:35) (Dakar/BRC, BMI — Record, Acklin) 

Thoroughly magnificent performance by the Artistics and a terrific piece of 
material make this easy-moving blues side a heavyweight item with the po- 
tential to break from R&B into the top forty sales ranks. An outstanding side 
for consideration. Flip: “Ain’t It Strange” (2:30) (Dakar/BRC, BMI — Miller, 
Jackson) 



PHIL FLOWERS (A&M 1168) 

Every Day I Have to Cry (3:11) (Tiki, BMI — Alexander) 

Back from “Like a Rolling Stone” and working more with his vocal power 
than before, Phil Flowers racks up a booming ballad with strength for the teen 
and blues markets. Standout delivery of the song and a surging instrumental 
backup give this the mark of a winner. Flip: No info included. 


TURLEY RICHARDS (Warner Bros. 7376) 

Love Minus Zero — No Limit (3:06) (M. Witmark, ASCAP — Dylan) 

Having gathered a following through live appearances, Turley Richards 
should add the catalyst of a single success with this his best outing to date. 
Stepping into his own style with this interpretation of the Bob Dylan favorite, 
Richards is supported by brilliant instrumental backup to reap teen, adult 
and FM action. Flip: No info. 


RONNIE DOVE (Diamond 271) 

Chains of Love (2:34) (Shelby Singleton, BMI — Charron) 

A departure from his softly styled ballad trademarks, Ronnie Dove moves 
into a song paced for the younger market which has eluded him for the last 
few releases. Brightly moving and geared to dance fans with just a subtle 
hint of old-rock, the new side should happen via top forty and MOR. Flip: No 
info supplied. 

Newcomer Picks 

RARE EARTH (Rare Earth 5012) 

Get Ready (2:46) (Jobete, BMI — Robinson) 

The major claim to Rare Earth’s fame, "Get Ready” has been strongly re- 
ceived in its full-LP-side performance. Now, the track is trimmed to a top 
forty excerpt magnifying the teen segment and eliminating the group’s FM 
instrumental. Miracles’ oldie has the power to happen all over again. Flip: 
No info included. 


THE MAIN INGREDIENT (RCA 0313) 

Can’t Stand Your Love (2:42) (Dunbar, BMI — Silvester, Simmons, McPher- 
son) 

Somewhat like a Jackson 5 aged in a top forty keg, the Main Ingredient sur- 
ges out of its container with an outstanding side that should place the team 
quickly in the running for both blues and top forty spotlight showcases. En- 
hanced by a towering instrumental, the act’s vocal carries dynamite whallop. 
Flip: “The Girl I Left Behind” (2:56) (Regent, BMI — Bailey, Williams) 


LOS INCAS (Mercury 73027) 

El Condor Pasa (2:16) (E.B. Marks, BMI — Robles) 

Instrumental version of this Peruvian folk tune introduces the team which 
performs “El Condor Pasa” in the latest Simon & Garfunkel album. Los Incas 
offer the pre-lyricized “Condor” with a totally unusual and haunting arrange- 
ment that could make it this year’s "Love Is Blue.” Flip: No info. 


Choice Programming 


Choice Programming selections are singles which, 
the opinion of our reviewing staff, are deserving 
special programmer consideration 



TONY BENNETT (Columbia 45109) 
Something (3: 18) (Harrisongs, BMI 
— Harrison) Tony Bennett’s special 
ability to give narrative meaning 
to lyrics applies particularly well 
in his performance of the Beatle song. 
Excellent. Flip: “Eleanor Rigby” 
(3: 40) (Maclen, BMI — Lennon, Mc- 
Cartney) Also powerfully produced, 
and with greater familiarity to MOR 
programmers. 


DEAN MARTIN (Reprise 0893) 

Come On Down (2:47) (Dino & Billy, 
BMI — Martin, Hinsche) Aiming for a 
contemporary sound, Martin takes a 
new tack instrumentally while work- 
ing to fit his vocal style to suit. More 
satisfying is the flip: “Down Home” 
(2:51) (Screen Gems/Columbia, 
BMI — Goffin, King) 

PEARL BAILEY (Project Three 
1376) 

Applause (1:44) (Edwin H. Morris, 
ASCAP — Adams, Strouse) “Dolly” 
delivers this lively showtune with 
the flair that could bring it to the 
fore despite the competition. Might 
break wide open. Flip: “When the 
World Was Young” (2:51) (Criter- 
ion, ASCAP — Gerard, Vannier, 
Mercer) 


JOHNNY MATHIS (Columbia 45104) 
Odds &; Ends (3: 04) (Blue Seas/Jac, 
ASCAP — David, Bacharach) Pretty 
song done originally by Dionne War- 
wick, “Odds & Ends” serves as a 
sparkling vehicle for Johnny Mathis. 
Pungent arrangement and delight- 
ful vocal. Flip: “For All We Know” 
(2: 58) (Cromwell/Leo Feist, ASCAP 
— Lewis, Coots) 


JIMMY ROSELLI (United Artists 50624) 
Angelina (2: 38) (Annie, ASCAP — 
Parker, Bennet) Attractive bit of 
material with the Italian fervor and 
humor that has made Roselli a fav- 
orite. Flip: “I’m Coming Home, Los 
Angeles” (3: 14) (Annie, ASCAP — 
Worth, Sanicole) 


SEALS & CROFTS (T-A 191) 

See My Life (2:57) (Harem, BMI — 
Seals) Unusual sound approach by 
this growing underground act could 
attract FM exposure of this side and 
excite album sales. Flip: No info 
included. 


JOE JEFFREY (Wand 11219) 

My Baby Loves Lovin’ (2: 56) (Cook- 
away, PRS — Cook, Greenaway) 
Splendid rock side with bright rhythm 
and pacing to set it strongly in the 
teen eardrum. Could return J.J. to 
the best seller spotlight. Flip: “The 
Chance of Loving You” (2:50) (Wed- 
nesday Morning, BMI — Weinstein, 
Russ) 


ACE CANNON (Hi 2174) 

Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town 
(2:42) (Cedarwood, BMI — Tillis) Fine 
instrumental treatment of the twice- 
round hit could reactivate “Ruby” yet 
again. Country, pop and now possibly 
an R&B breakout. Flip: “I Can’t Stop 
Loving You” (2:35) (Acuff Rose, BMI 
— Gibson) 


QUINCY JONES (A&M 1163) 

Killer Joe (2:45) (Andante, ASCAP — 
Golson) Jazz standard is brought 
pleasantly back to life in this easy 
listening version with grand instru- 
mentals supported by a choral wisp. 
Flip: “Maybe Tomorrow” (4: 18) (Fox 
Fanfare, BMI — Jones, A&M Bergman) 


LITTLE EVA (Spring 101) 

Mama Said (2: 43) (Ludix/Bettalbin, 
BMI — Dixon, Denson) Fine re-vital- 
ized performance of the oldie “Ma- 
ma Said” joins a top forty beat with 
blues power to aim for total teen/R&B 
acceptance. Flip: “Something About 
You Boy” (2:32) (Sreeby/Gaucho, 
BMI — Lombardo) 


20 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


G>lossiis has the touch. 



From their best-selling Album, cs-iooo 

The Shoclung Uue 

brings you another great single, c-iii 

MislityJoe 


D* IS^ NOF 
R-'S^-pftt’DUC ;C‘ - 




CashBoK Record Reviews 





Choice 


Programming 


Choice Programming selections are singles which, in 
the opinion of our reviewing staff, are deserving of 
special programmer consideration. 


Choice 



Choice Programming selections are singles which, 
the opinion of our reviewing staff, are deserving 
special programmer consideration. 


in 

of 


TED TAYLOR (Ronn 40) 

I Feel a Chill (2:45) (Su-Ma/Day & 
Davis, BMI — Davis, Day) Blues at- 
traction Ted Taylor turns to an inter- 
esting bit of material on his latest 
entry with the strength to move into 
the chart picture. Flip: “The Loving 
Physician" (2:30) (Fame, BMI — 
Hughes) 


SAM & DAVE (Atlantic 2714) 
Baby-Baby Don’t Stop Now (2:28) 
(Birdees, ASCAP — Hayes, Porter) 
The sheer impact of their old sound 
mount a new drive with the teaming 
of Sam & Dave and their “Soul Man” 
writers. Romp with R&B excitement. 
Flip: “I'm Not an Indian Giver” 
(2:32) (Cotillion/James Boy, BMI 
— James) 


FREDA PAYNE (Invidtus 9075) 

Band of Gold (2:50) (Gold Forever, 
BMI — Dunbar, Wayne) Fine driver 
side with a taste of the original Mo- 
town-sound to bolster the teen im- 
pact for blues and top forty stations. 
Flip: “The Easiest Way to Fall” 
(2:23) (Gold Forever, BMI — Layette, 
Dunbar, Wayne) 


MEMPHIS HORNS (Cotillion 44506) 

I Can’t Turn You Loose (2:30) 
(East/Memphis/Time/Redwal, BMI 
— Redding) Recent Otis Redding re- 
lease seethes as an instrumental re- 
cap with the thrust to break into the 
sales picture. Flip: “Time” (2:42) 
(Memphis Horns/Gold Dust, BMI — 
Love, Jackson) 


MARILYN MAYE (RCA 0318) 

Applause (2:05) (E.H. Morris, ASCAP 
— Adams, Strouse) Also pretty and 
with more attention paid to musical 
charm than humorous delivery. Solid 
contender to run with the Bailey. 
Flip: “Show Me Where The Good Times 
Are” (2: 50) (Volando, ASCAP — Ja- 
cobson, Roberts) 


JAYE P. MORGAN (Beverly Hills 9344) 
What Are You Doing The Rest Of 
Your Life (2: 15) (United Artists, 
ASCAP — Legrand, A&M Bergman) 
Both sides being good, Jaye P. Mor- 
gan stands a more solid shot with 
this Academy Award nominee than 
with the flip: “Applause” (2:20) 
(Morris, ASCAP — Adams, Strouse) 


BERT KAEMPFERT (Decca 732647) 
Someday We’ll Be Together (3:06) 
(Jobete, BMI — Beavers, Bristol, 
Fuqua) Instrumental/choral revision 
brings back the Supremes’ giant 
for Mor exposure this time round. 
Flip: “We Can Make It Girl” (3: 16) 
(Roosevelt, BMI — - Kaempfert, Reh- 
bein, Singleton, Snyder, Kusik) 


DICK HYMAN (Command 4132) 

The Dick Hyman Piano Concerto. Ex- 
cerpt from Movement 1 (3:25) (East- 
lake, ASCAP — Hyman) On the electro 
grand, Dick Hyman and his concerto 
flare to big band life with MOR scin- 
tillation. Flip: “Excerpt from Move- 
ment 11” (5: 15) (Same credits) 


THE AMERICAN YOUTH CHOIR 
(Polydor 14020) 

Together We Can Make It (2:45) (Geo. 
Pincus & Sons, ASCAP — Schiaks, 
Weiss) The material message and 
gentle delivery of the American 
Youth Choir could stir AM/FM and 
young adult interest for this powerful 
ballad. Flip: “Keep Your Fine 
Self Near Me” (1:58) (W.P.N., ASCAP 
— Schatz) 


THE CLINGERS (MGM 14110) 

Round, Round, Round (2:24) (Johnny 
Cymbal/Jo-Aaron, BMI — Clinger, 
Cymbal) Rousing rock outing in the 
manner that the Clingers displayed 
during a heavy round of tv exposure 
last year brings the team into a teen 
orbit. Flip: “Mean It” (1:54) (Same 
credits) 


OSCAR WEATHERS (Top & Bottom 
402) 

Your Fool Still Loves You (3: 18) (One 
Eye Soul/Van McCoy, BMI — McCoy) 
Slow, building ballad fare with a 
splendid production to fuse both blue 
and middle-of-the-road strength into 
this material. Flip: No info. 


HUBERT LAWS (CTI 501) 

La Jean (2: 30) (Press, BMI — Christ- 
opher) Pretty instrumental with a 
flute featured instead of the King 
Curtis sax that first offered the 
song on single. Soft, haunting and 
a good MOR, easy listening prospect. 
Flip: “Let It Be” (2: 15) (Maclen, 
BMI — Lennon, McCartney) 


PANHANDLE (Happy Tiger 532) 
Everyday (2: 29) (Peer Int’l, BMI — 
Hardin, Petty) Buddy Holly’s oldie is 
retunred to the pop scene with an 
enticing performance that could gain 
the momentum to spark sales acti- 
vity. Flip: “Tears Come With For- 
getting You” (2:34) (Checkmate, 
BMI — Ray, Dunham) 


THE DEDICATIONS (White Whale) 
Teardrops (2:57) (Arc/GMII, BMI — 
Andrews, Calhoun) From the early 
days of rock comes this Lee Andrews 
& the Hearts hit with a pretty treat- 
ment that could muster teen recep- 
tions. Flip: No info included. 


THE BLUE ANGELS (SSS Int’l 784) 

I Wonder (2:53) (Trio, BMI — Barry, 
Greenwich) Produced with the 
sound of early Shirelles work, this 
new-oldie carries a weighty magne- 
tism that might stir blues and top 
forty play. Flip: No info. 


RAINTREE (Amaret 117) 

Walk Out (2: 15) (Old World, BMI — 
Chafin) Teen side with a rhythmic 
drive to attract top forty play and 
youngster interest. Flip: “Land of 
Make Believe” (2:25) (Daje/Yuggoth, 
BMI — Flannery, R & L Stephens) 


THE YOUNG VANDALS (T Neck 
917) 

Too Busy Thinking ’Bout My Baby 

(2:31) (Jobete, BMI — Whitfield, Brad- 
ford, Strong) While-ago Motown hit 
is brought into the spotlight once 
more with a group sound that could 
stir renewed interest on the R&B 
side. Flip: “I’ve Been Good To You” 
(3:30) (Jobete, BMI — Stevenson, 
Hunter) 


WILLIE COLON (Fania 515) 

Che Che Colon (3:30) (Fania, BMI 
— Colon) From the charts in Puerto 
Rico, this rhythmic piece should stir 
Latin market excitement in the States. 
Flip: No info included. 


SYNDICATE OF SOUND (Buddah 156) 
Brown Paper Bag (2: 18) (Duane, 
BMI — Jenkins) Steady driving old- 
rock offering in sound carries a 
potent bit of instrumental punch and 
dance appeal to make it a party-fav- 
orite for teen listeners. Flip: “Re- 
verb Beat” (2:21) (Duane, BMI — 
Baskin, Jenkins) 


STEVE ROWLAND WITH FAMILY 
DOGG (Bell 863) 

Sympathy (3:00) (R&M, BMI — Rare 
Bird) Unusual side more suited to 
FM than AM for its initial action, the 
new Family Dogg single carries a 
lyric and lament performance which 
could draw top forty regard. Flip: 
No info. 


THE VISITORS (Dakar 613) 

I’m Gonna Stay (3: 00) (Dakar, BMI 
— Simmons, Jackson) Slow balladic 
plea with an ear-teasing group sty- 
ling to spark initial action from R&B 
programmers. Flip: “Lonely One- 
Only Son” (2:37) (Dakar, BMI — 
Simmons) 


THE BLACK & BLUES (Talun Stereo 
0715) 

Candy Castles (2: 38) (Tupco, BMI 
— McDonald) Work record sound with 
enough appeal to climb from secondary 
markets into a powerful top forty 
item. Promising outing that could 
break wide open. Flip: “Mid Sum- 
mer Night’s Dream” (2: 13) (Same 
credits) Talun, P.O. Box 1025, In- 
dianapolis 46206. 


THE SOUL CRUSADERS ORCH. 

(More Soul 904) 

My Cherie Amour (3: 00) (Jobete, 
BMI — Cosby, Wonder, Moy) (Pretty 
instrumental rendering of the Stevie 
Wonder smash could bring the side 
back for added exposure. Flip: “I 
Can’t Say No To You” (2:55) (Screen 
Gems/Columbia, BMI — Stone) More 
Soul, 746 E. 75th St., Chicago. 

PHYLLIS SMITH (Yew 1003) 

I Need Somebody To Love (2:35) 
(Saravan, BMI — Kelly) Attractively 
presented blues ballad with a spark- 
ling personality in both the material 
and artist departments, this track 
could spring into the R&B spotlight 
strongly. Flip: “The Feeling Is Gone” 
(Jobete, BMI — Wilson) 

OMNIBUS (United Artists 50631) 

The Man Song (3: 21) (UA/St. Nathan- 
son, ASCAP — Wegrzyn) Imitative 
Doors’ vocal delivery set to power- 
packed instrumentals could open the 
way to teen acceptance for this up- 
tempo side. Flip: “It’s All In Your 
Heart” (5: 55) (Same credits) 


THE UNIQUES (Paramount 0017) 
Eunice (2:38) (A1 Gallico, BMI — 

Stampley) Interesting bit of soft 
rock with country tang from the 
Uniques could come into the top 
forty picture. Flip: “No One But 
You” (2: 36) (Same credits) _ 

THE SOUL CHILDREN (Stax 0062) 

Hold On, I’m Coming (3:20) (East/ 
Memphis/Pronto, BMI — Hayes, Porter) 
The Sam & Dave goldie is brought 
back into focus with a progressive 
lens that slows the side and sharp- 
ens its impact for today’s teen audi- 
ence. Flip: “Make It Good” (3:06) 
(East/Memphis, BMI — Hayes, Porter) 

ROBIN McNAMARA (Steed 724) 

Lay A Little Lovin’ On Me (3:04) 
(Unart, BMI — Barry, McNamara, Cre- 
tecos) Peculiar vocal sound and a 
young teen song combine their im- 
pacts to entice top forty attention 
for this outing. Flip: “I’ll Tell You 
Tomorrow” (4: 00) (Unart, BMI — 
Barry, McNamara) 


MF you are reading 
someone eise’s copy oi 

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today g 


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Enclosed find my check. 

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22 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 




440/Plus Record Company Charlotte, North Carolina/ Worldwide Distribution by Monument Record Corporation 






Tape News Report 


Capitol Unites Tape/Disk Promotion 


HOLLYWOOD — Consumer and indus- 
try acceptance of tape as a main- 
stream product form has prompted 
Capitol Records to combine its tape 
merchandising, prom 9 tion and 
advertising with their disk counter- 
parts. The move becomes effective in 
the new fiscal year starting July 1, 
1970. 

Explaining the move, Capitol mer- 
chandising and marketing vp Rocco 
Catena told Cash Box, “We think the 
market is now settled. When eight- 
track was first introduced, we didn't 
get a warm reception from our estab- 
lished accounts, so we were forced to 
go to accounts who never before 
handled music. Therefore, we had to 
adapt our own internal organization to 
feed this completely new channel. Now 
that tape has become mainstream all 
the way, it makes greater sense to 
bring our merchandising back to 
where it was in the beginning.” 

“In the last two years, we have 
treated tape as a separate product line 
in terms of promotion, advertising, 
publicity and even in terms of distribu- 
tion. Now, we feel we have reached a 
point where we may even be doing 
tape an injustice handling it that way. 
To factor it out of the mainstream of 
everything else we do is probably not 
giving it due credit. Although our aim 
was to increase trade and consumer 
acceptance, we feel we might have 
been missing some sales. Now, instead 
of talking about recording modes, 
we're going to talk about artist’s 

Catena noted that Capitol, which 
now duplicates its own eight-track and 
cassettes, is releasing “over 90%” of 
its product simultaneously. In cases of 
simultaneous release, all mer- 


Ampex Sales/Earnings 
Set New Records For 
3rd Fiscal Quarter 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. — William 
Roberts, head of Ampex Corp., has 
reported record-breaking results for 
the firm’s sales and earnings during 
the third-fiscal-quarter just ended. The 
new high also brought Ampex to a 
peak for three-quarter totals. 

Showing a third quarter sales figure 
of $80,322,000, Ampex racked up a 9- 
month showing of $229,601,000. This 
represented a 9% climla in the last 
three months, and an 11% increase for 
the overall three-quarter fiscal period. 
Net earnings were up 19% for the year 
thus far, aided by an 11% rise in the 
Nov-Jan period. Figures in the earning 
area were $4,018,000 in the three- 
months and $11,444,000 for the three- 
quarters. 

Earnings per share came to $1.06 
(up 11% from 97 cents last year) for 
the full three-quarters. 

Roberts also stated that incoming 
product orders for the nine months 
were up 20% from last year. 

Norelco To Show 
Cassette Models 
At Photo Session 

PHILADELPHIA — North American 
Philips Corp. is preparing an exhibi- 
tion of cassette models to be shown at 
the upcoming show for the Master 
Photo Dealers’ & Finishers’ Associa- 
tion. The meetings will be held in 
Philadelphia during a show running 
from March 1 through 5. 

On the roster for exhibit by Norelco 
are a series of cassette players all de- 
signed for home and portable use. 
Hosting the company’s booths will be 
J.F. Gerrity, national sales manager 
for the photo trade. 


chandising and advertising will be 
handled by the particular pop project 
manager who would normally handle 
disk releases. “We still intend to do 
special promotions on catalog items 
issued on tape for the first time,” said 
Catena, “but they will fall under our 
project manager for catalog.” 

Special markets project manager 
Hal Rothberg, who has been handling 
tape merchandising, will continue to 
handle merchandising for Capitol- 
distributed tape accessories and equip- 
ment, and will be free to concentrate 
on other areas of tape development. 

Radio spots, which always carry a 
tag line denoting availability on tape, 
won’t be affected by the change. 

“I feel it will improve our cap- 
ability,” summed up Catena. “It’s very 
easy to forget about tape in dealing 
with our promotions. Now, it will 
become an automatic aspect of every- 
thing we do.” 


Cohen : ‘Micro Cassettes Are Growing 
With Dealers As Well As Young Buyers' 


NEW YORK — Price and packaging 
are the two extra factors that were 
cited by Jules Cohen, Ampex Stereo 
Tapes’ national marketing manager, 
for the growing popularity of micro 
cassettes with both dealers and young 
buyers. 

AST’s line has, he said, proved “a 
great attraction to young buyers” by 
presenting an abbreviated version of 
the LP cassette album with four selec- 
tions included on a regular-cassette 
sized cartridge at a retail of $1.98. “Al- 
though the micros cost about the same 
as two singles,” he pointed out, “they 
contain four of the artist’s top songs 
where a single usually has only one 
strong side.” An example Cohen 
showed was “Tom Jones,” a micro 
including “I Can’t Stop Loving You,” 
“Love Me Tonight,” “I’ll Never Fall in 


RIAA Combats Tape Piracy 


(Con't. from Page 7) 
bill attempted to fight prosecution 
through established funds into which 
they were depositing the required 
amount in royalty payments. 
However, even this dodge is being at- 
tacked because the copyright laws 
require documented records and 
analysis for the money obtained, as 
well as permission to reproduce the 
recording. 

Seeking further alliance in carrying 
legislation against pirates, the RIAA is 
working in alliance with the American 
Federation of Musicians since the AF 
of M is being denied finances to its 
“performance trust fund” and the fund 
collecting and paying musicians 
directly involved in recordings 
perforrhed. 

NARM offers the fourth major arm 
of the RIAA push giving “fast feed- 
back from the source that is often the 
first to know of pirating operations.” 

NARM members, receiving pirate 
offers at the retail rack level, have 
joined RIAA’s drive recognizing the 
effect of piracy on the manufacturers. 
Pirated tapes, often selling for as 
much as $2 below list on regular tapes, 
not only hurt the legal sales in an area 
that is protected by “unfair competi- 
tion” legislation: but the poor quality 
of pirate tapes are, in many cases, 
smearing the reputation of the entire 
industry. 

Segovia Decca Catalog 
Now Complete On Tape 
For March Promotion 

NEW YORK — Decca Records has 
brought the complete catalog of 
Andres Segovia product out on tape in 
time for the commig month-long 
promotion drive centered about 
“Segovia Month” this March. Bringing 
his roster of titles to a full 23, Decca is 
also releasing the new “Castles of 
Spain” album in cassette, cartridge 
and open reel at the highlight of a 
drive covering all recorded product by 
the world-famous guitarist. 

Supporting the “Segovia Month” 
promotion, Decca has prepared a full- 
scale coverage advertising and 
promoting the artist’s entire catalog. 
This is the latest month-long feature 
by the company, following the 
February accent on Bert Kaempfert. 

Segovia is currently completing his 
annual U.S. concert tour which will 
continue through March 28. This week 
he performed in New York, and will be 
making concert appearances in 
Columbus, Ohio (24) and Winnipeg 
(28) before touring ’Victoria (Mar. 8), 
Riverside, Calif. (11), San Francisco 
(13), Torrance, Calif. (18), Los 
Angeles (20, 22) and Washington, D.C. 
(28.). 


Of the utmost importance is the exer- 
tion of pressure to pass a national law 
providing uniform measures for 
prosecuting piracy. Brief said that an 
“omnibus bill” covering numerous 
areas of infringement has been 
moving through Congress for nearly 
five years now, and that with the 
newly enlisted support of the afore- 
mentioned groups RIAA now feels that 
it has the wherewithal to impress on 
the legislative body the importance of 
finally passing the bill. 

At present, only two states have 
specific civil bills prohibiting piracy. 
New York and California. Texas and 
Arizona are considering proposed bills 
against pirate operations. 

But, it is the national bill that RIAA 
is lobbying for against the dubbing of 
recorded works. More than petitioning 
on the basis of piracy hurting the indus- 
try in several manners and on various 
levels, RIAA’s approach now con- 
centrates on proving to the govern- 
ment that the losses also influence 
franchise and income tax revenues on 
an estimated $100,000,000 business in 
pirated tape product. 

The difficulty in carrying through 
prosecution with no national statute is 
pointed to by the frequency with which 
proved pirating cases escape un- 
punished because of inequities in the 
law from one state, city or county to 
another. 

Under the current legal statutes 
also, offenders are subject only to a 
fine which is seldom large enough to 
prove a deterrent. “The cast for a 
pirate is often made up in a week’s 
profits,” Brief said, “and since there is 
no imprisonment under the present 
laws, the defendent is back in business 
almost immediately.” 

In addition to carrying through the 
Congressional pressure, RIAA is also 
seeking to have imprisonment as part 
of the punishment for piracy. This 
would give the pirate a bit more to 
think about before-hand, and it would 
put his operation out of business in the 
event of a conviction. 


250" Titles In GRTs 
New Budget Brochure 

LOS ANGELES — GRT has just re- 
leased its first budget tape catalog 
listing the more than 250 titles in the 
firm’s 8-track series. 

Larry Finn, GRT’s national sales 
promotion manager, said that the 
brochure is being made available to 
distributors and rack merchandisers 
for use both as an order form and as a 
checklist for inventory purposes. 

Titles from the classical, country, 
R&B, jazz, rock, pop and children’s 
repertoire are listed alphabetically by 
manufacturer for convenience. Titles 
are listed at $4.98 except for children’s 
which list at $3.98. 


Love Again” and “Twist & Shout.” 

Designed to compete with single re- 
leases, the micro cassette was 
introduced at Ampex with marketing 
that started in 1968 after the EIA show. 
The catalog currently includes nearly 
150 selections from more than 20 labels 
in a catalog constantly being revised 
to meet changing popular taste. 

The majority of micro’s selections 
are rock favorites, Cohen noted, aimed 
specifically at the portable recorder 
listener, but the line includes Golden 
Records’ children’s titles such as 
“Peter Rabbit” and “Little Red Riding 
Hood.” 

In addition to the artist featured 
micros, Ampex has also made avail- 
able several variety packages coupl- 
ing hits by several artists from a high- 
lighted label. Atlantic has provided 
one such package with material from 
the Rascals, Cream, Bee Gees and 
Wilson Pickett. 

Performers included in the recent 
January micro issue from Ampex 
exemplify the variety of teen oriented 
material in the configuration: Aretha 
Franklin, Creedence Clearwater 
Revival, 3 Dog Night, Engelbert Hum- 
perdinck, Led Zeppelin and Judy 
Collins. 

A major contribution to the recent 
growth shown for micro cassettes has 
been attributed to dealer acceptance, 
Cohen commented. 

Dealers, he said, like the packaging 
which not only attracts young buyers 
but also can be used with rack hooks 
or browser bins for display. The pack- 
ages feature pictures of the artist 
featured and list the four songs in the 
album. All this adds up to quick turn- 
over for the less expensive micro. 

“Since the young buyer usually uses 
an inexpensive portable player,” 
Cohen added, “four songs for $1.98 suit 
his budget better than the $6.95 cas- 
sette album.” 

AST estimates $140-million in cas- 
sette sales this year, Cohen concluded, 
and micro cassette should be a sub- 
stantial help in reaching that goal. 


Three Tape Models 
In Columbia’s New 
Masterwork Product 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records is 
currently introducing 10 new models to 
its Masterwork Audio Products line in 
open house meetings from coast-to- 
coast. The spring line includes three 
tape models in addition to radio and 
component hi-fi equipment. 

Two of the new units are 8-track car- 
tridge players, the 8608 retailing for 
$79.95; and the 8658 tape deck which 
also houses a record changer to retail 
for $99.95. The third unit is a cassette 
model, 656, with monaural record/play- 
back features and a stereo switch for 
stereo playback. Complete with micro- 
phone, stand, carrying case, batteries 
and the like this model is tagged at 
$69.95 retail. 

Columbia’s other units include three 
“century” model amplifiers with 
AM/FM and FM tuner; an AC/DC 
portable phonograph with AM/FM 
radio; table model AM/FM digital 
clock radio; 9 band World-wide 
portable transistor radio; and com- 
plete 5-piece component system. 

In announcing the new line, Milton 
Seiko witz, director of Masterwork 
Audio Products, pointed out that 
though there was a general industry 
decline in late ’69, Masterwork showed 
its sharpest gains during the same 
period through a concentrated 
promotion campaign and concentra- 
tion on strong selling modular com- 
ponent systems. 


24 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


r 




ncii 




VICTOR 


performed by AL HIRT and HUGO MONTENEGRO 


PEIERUSIOV PAME[JlTirfiiN«T0fflASl inVIMAK! 

co-$tar^ Keenan Wynn ■ Harry Morgan * Aliu Gliostley ■ Ksnwth 
Mark Ca^inar • Jerry Paris • Ellkm%*ker James Lehrer 

Hugo Montenegro, Ralph Dino •« John Sem hello 


LSP-4275/P8S-1529 


If your wife and 
kids want you to 
take them toa 
movie next weekend 
this is what you'll 
probably be seeing. 


The “Viva Max!” soui^r- 'a- . "fea- 
tures music performed by ^ nhv d 
Hugo Montenegro, cona : Ter 
Hugo Montenegro. Music s-jpe; - 
sion is inthecapable handsof Char^^r 
Koppelman and Don Rubin, who bav 
been responsible for many told an* 
untold rock successes. 

Get used to “Viva Max!” 

It’s the movie you may be seeing 
next weekend. 

It’s the sound track you’ll be sell- 
ing next Monday. 

RGil Records and Tapes 


“Viva Max!” is the G-rated movie 
that will be playing at neighborhood 
theaters everywhere in America next 
weekend, and for quite a few weeks 
to come. 

“Viva Max!” is a funny movie. It 
received good reviews. And, you 
guessed it,thesoundtrackis a winner. 



NewAdditmas To JRadio PiayUsis 

A broad view of the titles many of radio’s key Top 40 stations added to their "Playlists" last week. 


WLS — Chicago 

Gotta Hold On— Jr, Walker— Soul 
Jennifer Tomkins— Street People— Musicor 
Come & Get It— Badfinger— Apple 
Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 
Spirit In The Sky— Norman Greenbaum— Reprise 
Until It's Time— Neil Diamond— Uni 
Stir It Up— Tommy Roe— ABC 
Ticket To Ride— Carpenters— A&M 


WITHOUT LOVE (THERE IS 
NOTHING) 

TOMJONES PARROT 

Progressive Music 
Suffolk Music 


(THERE’S) ALWAYS SOMETHING 
THERETO REMIND ME 


R.B. GREAVES.... 

ATCO 

Anne-Rachel Music 
Blue Seas Music 
Jac Music 

DON’T CRY DADDY 

ELVIS PRESLEY... 

RCA 

Elvis Presley Music 
B-n-B Music 

KENTUCKY RAIN 

ELVIS PRESLEY... 

RCA 

Elvis Presley Music 
S-P-R Music 


CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE 

ANDY WILLIAMS COLUMBIA 

AL MARTINO CAPITOL 

Gladys Music Inc. 

DOWN IN THE ALLEY 

RONNIE HAWKINS COTILLION 

Progressive Music 

VICTORIA 

THE KINKS REPRISE 

Noma Music 
Hi Count Music 

(I’M SO) AFRAID OF LOSING YOU 
AGAIN 

CHARLEY PRIDE RCA 

Hill & Range Songs 
Blue Crest Music 

CHARLIE BROWN 

COMPTON BROS DOT 

Tiger Music 

I’VE BEEN EVERYWHERE 

LYNN ANDERSON CHART 

Hill & Range Songs 

MAMA, I WON’T BE WEARING 
A RING 

PEGGY LITTLE DOT 

Hill & Range Songs 
Blue Crest Music 

THE GOLDEN ROCKET 

JIM & JESSE EPIC 

Hill & Range Songs 

MY LITTLE FRIEND 

ELVIS PRESLEY RCA 

Elvis Presley Music 
Last Straw Music 

WAITIN’ FOR CHARLIE TO 


COME HOME 

NANCY WILSON CAPITOL 

Dolfi Music 

FRIENDS 

ARRIVAL LONDON 

Noma Music 
Inquiry Music 

(CALL ME) NUMBER ONE 

THETREMELOES EPIC 

Noma Music 

REFLECTIONS OF MY LIFE 

THE MARMALADE LONDON 

Noma Music 


THE ABERBACH GROUP 
241 West 72 Street, New York, N.Y. 


WABC - New York 

Baby Take Me— Jefferson— Janus 
Ain’t Heavy— Hollies— Epic 

WMEX - Boston 

Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 
Can’t Help— Al Martino— Capitol 
Come & (jet It— Badfinger— Apple 
Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends Of Distinction 
-RCA 

Kicking It Back To You— Eagle— Janus 


WMCA — New York 

Pick: Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 
Add Some Music— Beach Boys— Warner Bros. 

Up The Ladder To The Roof— Supremes— Motown 
Funky Chicken— Rufas Thomas— Stax 
All That I’ve Got— Billy Preston— Apple 
Mighty Joe— Shocking Blue— Colossus 
Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends of Distinction 
-RCA 

Easy Come— Bobby Sherman— Metromedia 
Slow Down— Crow— Amaret 
Your The One— Little Sister— Stone Flower 
LP: Morrison Hotel— Doors— Elektra 


WMAK — Nashville 

If 1 Were— Johnny Cash June Carter— Columbia 

I’ve Gotta Make You— Steam— Mercury 

Good Guys— Mel & Tim— Bamboo 

Ticket To Ride— Carpenters— A&M 

Peter & Wolf— Chas. Randolph Grean— Ranwood 

Kentucky Rain— Elvis Presley— RCA 

New World Coming— Mama Cass— Dunhill 

All I Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 

Pick: Mississippi Mama— Owen B— Janus 

WKBW - Buffalo 

Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Walking Through— Grass Roots— Dunhill 
One A.M.— Wheatstraw— Wand 
All I Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 
Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 

WEAM — Washington D. C. 

Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 

Come & Get It— Badfinger— Apple 

My Elusive Dreams— Bobby Vinton— Epic 

The Bells— Originals— Soul 

Silly Silly Fool— Dusty Springfield— Atlantic 

WDRC — Hartford 

Let’s Give Adam & Eve— Gary Puckett— Columbia 
Spirit In The Sky— Norman Greenbaum— Reprise 
Stir It Up— Tommy Roe— ABC 
Add Some Music— Beach Boys — Reprise 
Time To Get It— Country Coallition— ABC 
Up The Ladder To The Roof— Supremes— Motown 

WTIX — New Orleans 

Does Anybody Know What Time It is— Copper & 
Brass— Amazon 

Come Into My Life— Jimmy Cliff— A&M 
Thrill Is Gone— B. B. King— Bluesway 
Give Me Just— Chairmen— Invictus 
Come & Get It— Badfinger— Apple 

KXOK - St. Louis 

Pick: Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Pick: Rag Mama Rag— Band— Capitol 
Come Together— Ike & Tina Turner— Minit 
Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 
Temma Harbour— Mary Hopkin— Apple 
Sparkle & Shine— Clique— White Whale 
Silly Silly Fool— Dusty Springfield— Atlantic 
Stir It Up— Tommy Roe — ABC 


WSAI — Cincinnati 

Funky Chicken— Rufus Thomas— Sfax 
Stir It Up— Tommy Roe— ABC 
Deeper In Love With You— O’Jays— Neptune 
All I Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 
Love Or Let Me Be Lonely — Friends of Distinction 
-RCA 

Long Lonesome Highway— Michael Parks— MGM 
Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Rhymes & Reasons— Irish Rovers — Decca 

KILT — Houston 

Pick: Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends of 
Distinction— RCA 

Funky Chicken— Rugus Thomas— Stax 
Let’s Give Adam & Eve — Gary Puckett— Columbia 
Rising Sun— Frijid Pink— Parrot 
Love Minus Zero — No Limit — Turley Richards — 
Warner Bros. 

You Keep Tightening Up On Me— Box Tops— Bell 


WQAM — Miami 

My Elusive Dreams— Bobby Vinton— Epic 
Pick: Give Me Just— Chairmen— Invictus 


WQXI - Atlanta 

Come Together— Ike & Tina Turner— Minit 
Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 
Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends Of Distinction 
-RCA 

Cat Walk— Village Soul Choir— Abbott 

All I Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 

WDGY — Minneapolis 

Rising Sun— Frijid Pink— Parrot 
Easy Come— Bobby Sherman— Metromedia 
Thrill Is Gone— B. B. King— Bluesway 
Jennifer Tomkins— Street People— Musicor 
Didn’t I— Delfonics— Philly Groove 
Never Had— Stevie Wonder— Tamla 
Come & Get It— Badfinger— Apple 
Love Grows— Edison Lighthouse— Bell 
Superstar— Murray Head— Decca 
Somethings’ Burning— Kenny Rogers— Reprise 
Kentucky Rain— Elvis Presley- RCA 
Call Me— Aretha Franklin— Atlantic 


WIXY — Cleveland 

Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 

Mighty Joe— Shocking Blue— Colossus 

All 1 Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 

Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 

Little Green Bag — Geo. Baker Selection— Colossus 

Rag Mama Rag— Band— Capitol 

Up The Ladder To The Roof— Supremes— Motown 


WOKY — Milwaukee 

Lets Give Adam & Eve— Gary Puckett— Columbia 
Spirit In The Sky— Norman Greenbaum— Reprise 
Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Reflections Of My Life— Marmalade— Parrot 
Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 
Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 


WRKO - Boston 

Reflections Of My Life— Marmalade— Parrot 
Shilo— Neil Diamond— Bang 
Little Green Bag— Geo. Baker Selections— 
Colossus 

Add Some Music— Beach Boys— Reprise 


KRLA — Pasadena 

Time To Get It— Country Coallition— ABC 
Let’s Give Adam & Eve— Gary Puckett— Columbia 
Nothing Succeeds Like Success— Bill Deal- 
Heritage 

Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends of Distinc- 
tion— RCA 

Rising Sun— Frigid Pink— Parrot 

KIMN — Denver 

Never Had A Dream— Stevie Wonder— Tamla 
Elusive Dreams— Bobby Vinton— Epic 
Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Take A Look— Smith— Dunhill 
Love Grows— Edison Lighthouse— Bell 


KFRC — San Francisco 

Rising Sun— Frigid Pink— Parrot 
Nothing Succeeds Like Success— Bill Deal- 
Heritage 

Long Lonesome Highway— Michael Parks— MGM 
Reflections Of My Life— Marmalade— Parrot 
WalkingThrough— Grassroots— Dunhill 


KHJ — Hollywood 

Kentucky Rain— Elvis Presley— RCA 
Let’s Give Adam & Eve— Gary Puckett— 
Columbia 

Nothing Succeeds Like Success— Bill Deal- 
Heritage 

Up The Ladder To The Roof— Supremes— 
Motown 


KYA — San Francisco 

Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends of Distinc- 
tion— RCA 

The Bells— Originals— Soul 
Call Me— Aretha Franklin— AJantic 
Walking Through— Grassroots— Dunhill 
Up The Ladder To The Roof— Supremes— 
Motown 

Long Lonesome Highway— Michael Parks— MGM 
Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 
You’re The One— Little Sister— Stone Flower 
Brown Paper Bag— Syndicate Of Sound— Buddah 


KQV — Pittsburgh 

Rising Sun— Frigid Pink— Parrot 
Instant Karma— John Ono Lennon— Apple 
Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 
Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 


WFIL — Philadelphia 

Reflections Of My Life— Marmalade— London 
Come Saturday Morning— John Ono Lennon— 
Apple 

Celebrate— 3 Dog Night— Dunhill 
Never Had— Stevie Wonder— Tamla 
Call Me— Aretha Franklin— Atlantic 


CKLW - Detroit 

Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 



Shilo— Neil Diamond— Bang 
Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends of Distinction 
-RCA 


WAYS — Charlotte 

Mighty Joe— Shocking Blue— Colossus 
Sugar Shaker— Errol Sober— Abnak 
You’re Right Ray Charles— Joe Tex— Dial 
Up The Ladder To The Roof—Supremes— 
Motown 

Love Or Let Me Be Lonely— Friends Of Distinc- 
tion— RCA 

WKNR - Detroit 

I’ve Got A Thing— Funkadelics— Westbound 
Love Grows— Edison Lighthouse— Bell 
Of Me Oh My— Lulu— Atco 
Come & Get It— Badfinger— Apple 
Ail 1 Have To Do— Gentry— Campbell— Capitol 
Take A Look Around— Smith— Dunhill 
Gotta Hold On— Jr. Walker— Soul 
Celebrate— Three Dog Night— Dunhill 

WCAO — Baltimore 

Chains Of Love— Ronnie Dove— Diamond 
Rag Mama Rag— Band— Capitol 
Funky Chicken— Rufas Thomas— Stax 
Who’s Your Baby— Archies— Kirshner 
Up The Ladder To The Roof—Supremes— 
Motown 


New Oldies Show 
Slated For Garden 

NEW YORK — Little Richard, The 
Drifters, The Coasters, The Chantels, 
Gene Vincent, Timi Yuro and The Five 
Satins are among the star performers 
Richard Nader has assembled for an 
original 1950’s Rock & Roll Revival 
show to be held at the Felt Forum 
March 20 and 21. 

Nader’s Music Production Consult- 
ants, Inc., will produce the two-day 
show in cooperation with Madison 
Square Garden. There will be 2 shows 
each night at 7: 30 and 11: 00 p.m. 

Beginning March 24, another group 
of 50’s rock stars headed by Bill Haley 
& The Comets and Chuck Berry will 
launch a 40-city tour for Nader’s Mu- 
sic Production Consultants. 


Clark, Blue Ribbon 
Join Forces Again 

LONDON — Maurice Clark, formerly 
managing director of Jewel Music, 
rejoins Harry and Gene Goodman’s 
Blue Ribbon Music and Triston Music 
Companies. 

The new Companies will promote all 
types of pop and light music, and in- 
dues a blues catalogue containing 
material written by Chuck Berry, 
Willie Dixon, Jimmy Reed, John Lee 
Hooker etc. Blue Ribbon already have 
many tracks issued on albums and has 
its first big single release ‘Who Do 
You Love’ by Juicy Lucy on Vertigo 
and Ronnie Hawkins on Roulettes: 
also, John Lee Hooker’s latest album 
‘This Is Where It's At’. 


26 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


y 



The James boys are at it again. 


Tommy James & The Shondells 
“Gotta Get BackTo You”r 


R-7071 




KNOCK ON WOOD — The musical “The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagon- 
ny’’ is soon to be presented on Mar. 10 by Carmen Capalbo (center) and Abe 
Margolis in association with Atlantic Records. Discussing it with Capalbo are 
Ahmet Ertegun (right) and Jerry Wexler of Atlantic. Atlantic has the original 
cast recording rights. “Mahagonny,” which started previews last week, will 
open off-Broadway at the Anderson Theatre in N.Y. It stars Barbara Harris, 
Estelle Parsons and Mort Shuman. 


March Is Mantovani Month At London 


iVB Music Print Dept. 
Shows Sales Gains; 

Exec Realignment 

NEW YORK — George Lee, vice-presi- 
dent & general manager of Warner 
Bros. Music, reports a realignment of 
personnel in the publication division. 
Dan Fox, publications manager, has 
also assumed the duties of editor. 
Eileen Michael has joined the company 
in the publisher relations slot and is 
responsible for licensing songs for 
print from outside publishers. Bob 
Alexander has been named Education- 
al Representative and will handle the 
promotion of educational music. 

Lee pointed out that with the publica- 
tion and printing of sheet music, folios, 
band, choral and other publications, 
Warner Bros, has enjoyed a sharp 
sales increase in the pop and educa- 
tional fields with the publication of 
such best selling items as “Rod Mc- 
Kuen At Carnegie Hall", “Sinutra 
Sings McKuen”, “The Band And Music 
From The Big Pink”, “Up On Cripple 
Creek”, “Rag Mama Rag”, “M^a Belle 
Amie”, “All I Have To Do Is Dream”, 
“Lu”, “Save The Country”, “Blowin’ 
Away”, in addition to folios containing 
“The Sounds Of Janis Joplin" and 
“Laura Nyro” forthcoming. 

Ranwood Inks Dtr. 

Of Charles Grean 

NEW YORK — Robin Grean, the 
daughter of vet music man Charles 
Grean, has been inked to a disk pact 
at Ranwood Records. Robin appeared 
as a chanting songstress on her dad’s 
smash disking for Ranwood, “Quen- 
tin’s Theme,” and two sides of the 
LP follow-up. Randy Wood, president 
of the label, requested that Grean cut 
his daughter. The result is a single, 
“Call Me Down to Chelsea,” penned 
by the artist, and “And I’ll Forget 
You,” written by her dad. Robin left 
Ithaca College to study singing at the 
Dalcroze School of Music with David 
Collyer in New York. For the past 
few years, she’s done group singing 
on disk sessions, TV and national 
commercials. 

Her father, hoping to avoid frequent 
mispronunciations of his last name, 
notes that the correct way is “Gree- 
On,” with the accent on the first syl- 
lable. 

Randazzo Milestones 

NEW YORK — February is shaping 
up as a milestone month for composer- 
arranger-producer Teddy Randazzo. 
This month marks the release of the 
first disk on his recently formed label. 
Buttercup Records. The platter, 
“Woman to Woman” by Sheila Antho- 
ny, arranged and produced by Randaz- 
zo, will be distributed by Jubilee. 

Radio and TV performances of 
“Goin’ out of My Head” have exceeded 
the one million mark. 

By the end of February sales of rec- 
ords of Randazzo songs will pass the 
40 million total. The composer’s tunes, 
including “Goin’ out of My Head,” 
“Hurt So Bad,” “Take Me Back,” 
“Rain in My Heart” and many others, 
have been recorded by top artists all 
over the world. 

'Hair’s' Nicholls 
On Avco-Embassy 

NEW YORK — Allan Nicholls, the 
Canadian singer currently playing the 
feature role of Claude in the Broad- 
way production of “Hair” has recorded 
“Going Down,” a song from the 
show, as his first release on the new 
Avco Embassy label. Previously lead 
singer with the Carnival Connection, 
he produced the single, backed with 
his own composition, “Sounds And 
Noises.” 

He has recorded several radio com- 
mercials, modeled for print ads and 
filmed a television commercial for 
Therablem which is currently running 
nationally in the U. S. and Canada. 

Nickels’ Music Inc., the publishing 
and production company that Nicholls 
established to help other Canadian 
writers, has signed John Pimm, a 
Montreal composer previously with a 
group called Rabble. Nicholls’ own 
songs will also be published through 
the company, located at 420 Lexington 
in New 'Vork. 


NEW YORK— The 19th annual “March 
Is Mantovani Month” promotion has 
been launched at London Records. The 
company is geared up for one of its 
most all-encompassing promo cam- 
paigns of the entire year. The push 
incorporates a brand new LP, “Manto- 
vani Today,” plus a continuing effort 


ASCAP Meet Special 
To ‘Frisco’ Writers 

NEW YORK — ASCAP-writers Doug- 
lass Cross and George Cory have a 
special reason to attend the society’s 
west coast Membership Meeting on 
February 25. 

Cross’ and Cory’s hit song, “I Left 
My Heart in San Francisco”, became 
the official song of that City last Octo- 
ber. In recognition of this honor, 
ASCAP President Stanley Adams will 
-present plaques to these writers at the 
Society’s meeting at the Century Plaza 
Hotel in Los Angeles. 

Cross and Cory, as ambassadors of 
the City of San Francisco, are sched- 
uled to sail on the President Cleveland 
on an a round-the-world tour that same 
day. They will represent San Francisco 
at the opening of that City’s Pavilion 
at the Japanese World’s Fair. 

In order to receive their plaques 
from Adams, both writers will leave 
a party in their honor aboard ship on 
the 25th and fly to Los Angeles in time 
for the meeting. They rejoin the ship 
the following day when it arrives in 
Los Angeles. 


on the Mantovani catalog which now 
numbers 52 albums. 

According to Herb Goldfarb, Lon- 
don’s national sales and distribution 
manager, the Mantovani effort is the 
longest-running consecutive annual 
campaign for an individual record ar- 
tist in the history of the industry. 

The drive, which brings into play 
London’s entire staff of home office 
as well as regional and district sales 
and promo execs, incorporates a color- 
ful array of merchandising aids and an 
unusually broad distribution of promo 
copies of the “Mantovani Today” LP. 

Basically contemporary material, 
the LP includes such new pop classics 
as “Everybody’s Talkin’,” “(Jood 
Morning Starshine,” “I’ll Never Fall 
in Love Again,” “Without Love,” 
“Theme from Midnight Cowboy” and 
“Leavin’ on a Jet Plane.” 

All of the famed maestro’s previous 
albums have been on the charts, a fact 
which again gives Mantovani a unique 
distinction in the record scene, and all 
of them continue in the active London 
catalog. 

Mantovani concluded his 14th an- 
nual two-month tour of the U. S. just 
last December and is already in line 
for a record-breaking 15th annual tour, 
commencing next September. The 
annual Mantovani tours have met with 
unrivalled success at the box office 
with many of the concerts reaching 
SRO status weeks before the actual 
date of the appearance. He is widely 
regarded as the most successful tour- 
ing attraction in the history of the one- 
nighter concert business. 


Karmen Growing in 
TV Commercial Field 


NEW YORK — As the television medi- 
um grows, so does the value of com- 
mercials, and so do the successes of 
various composer-lyricists working in 
the field. One of the most popular has 
been Steve Karmen who, over the past 
three years, wrote music and lyrics 
for the commercials: “You Can Take 
Salem Out Of The Country . . . ,” 
“Breakaway With Pontiac,” “Call The 
Man From Nationwide” (insurance). 
In addition, he is currently writing all 
the music and lyrics for Halo Shampoo, 
Budweiser Beer, Beneficial Finance 
and Chrysler. And, working with film 
music, he wrote the score for the Unit- 
ed Artists film, “What Do You Say to 
a Naked Lady?” which opened last 
week (18) in New York. 

An expert at writing a song that 
gets the message across in thirty sec- 
onds, he has been called upon over the 
last year or so as a “Sotto Voce” ad- 
viser to some advertising agencies in 
the structuring of their commercial 
messages and in the formation of 
“interpretive” music for their various 
products. 

He feels that many of the commer- 
cials today are over-produced and 
that we are part of the “sound era” 
which ad agencies must learn to utilize 
to the fullest. He is of the opinion that 
when selling a product on TV, the 
sound can become strongly visual as 
well, for people watching TV must 
identify a sound with the visual ex- 
perience to get the full impact of the 
message. All the campaigns he has 
worked on use music and sound as 
the basis of the sales message, even 
though it is being done in a visual 
medium. He feels that once you have 
the public’s attention with an easily 
identifiable song, the agencies in 
question are vitiating the effectiveness 
and longevity of the campaign by 
insisting upon change, for the sake of 
change alone, after much creative 
effort in establishing a sound in the 
public’s mind. 

Steve Karmen is convinced that 
when you have a definitive music 
score with a commercial, that the ad- 
dition of extraneous sound effects for 
“production value” only wears down 
the audience, makes the commercial 
message too busy, and in general, 
weakens the entire approach. He feels 
the function of his campaigns is to 
make people listen, to catch their eye 
and get them to go to the place where 
the product is sold and then it’s up to 
the salesman to make the deal. The 
product must have its own individual 
sound to achieve a lasting impression. 


Butler Professional 


Mgr. Of Publishing 
Operations 

NEW YORK — Kevin Butler has been 
named professional manager for j 
Blendingwell Music (ASCAP) and 
Sister John (BMI), publishing com- 
panies of the Cashman, Pistilli & West 
pop music complex. 

In his new capacity Butler will be 
responsible for the promotion of exist- 
ing catalog and placement of future 
product. CP&W cited Butler’s appoint- ; 
ment as part of their commitment to 
enhance and strengthen their rapidly 
growing organization. 

Prior to joining CP&W, Kevin Butler 
was associated with Four Star Music 
in New York and Kebar Music. Butler j 
attended Fordham University. 

Among the many hit songs written 
by CP&W are “Sunday Will Never Be 
The Same,” a million seller for Spanky 
and Our Gang, A1 Martino’s hit 
“Sausalito,” Eddy Arnold’s country 
hit “But For Love,” the Buchanan 
Brothers’ “Medicine Man” and chart- 
bound “Rosianna.” CP&W’s latest re- 
lease for Capitol Records is “Goodbye 
Jo.” 



ONWARD CHRISTIAN MAGICIAN — or musician-in this case Ringo Starr. 
He and his wife Maureen attended the post-premiere party in Los Angeles 
of “The Magic Christian,” in which Ringo co-stars with Peter Sellers in his 
first serious acting role. The Commonwealth United film is produced by Denis 
O’Dell and directed by Joseph McGrath and has since opened in 67 key markets 
across the country. 


28 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 




"CHMm OF Limr 

DIAMOND D-S71 

A JERRY ROSS Production Arranged by CHUCK SAGLE 





CashBox Album Reviews 




Pop Picks 



HEY JUDE — Beatles — Apple SW 385 
This album is a collection of Beatles singles 
both old and recent. “Hey Jude,” “Revolu- 
tion," “Paperback Writer,” “I Should Have 
Known Better,” “Lady Madonna,” “Can’t Buy 
Me Love,” “Don’t Let Me Down,” “Ballad Of 
John And Yoko,” “Rain” and “Old Brown 
Shoe” are the cuts. Only two of these songs 
(“Can’t Buy Me Love” and “I Should Have 
Known Better”) have ever appeared in album 
form before. This set \vill be zooming up the 
charts soon. 


CAN’T TAKE MY EYES OFF YOU — Nancy 
Wilson — Capitol ST 429 
Thrush Nancy Wilson sings the title song, 
her recent hit, then turns to the Oscar-nom- 
inated “Raindrops Keep Failin’ On My Head,” 
the BS&T biggie “You’ve Made Me So Very 
Happy,” and Leonard Cohen’s poetic master- 
piece “Suzanne.” Add "A Brand New Me,” 
the recent Gary Puckett smash “This Girl 
Is A Woman Now” and several others and 
you have an album which is a rich treasure 
sure to please Nancy’s many fans. Item is 
sure to appear on the charts; don’t take your 
eyes off this deck. 


LORD SUTCH AND HEAVY FRIENDS - 
Cotillion SD 9015 

Lord Sutch, with the help of his heavy 
friends Jimmy Page, John Bonham, Jeff 
Beck, Noel Redding and Nicky Hopkins, has 
come up with an album that has excited 
enough attention to put it on the charts. Sutch 
is a screaming rock singer whose vocal energy 
seems boundless, and his friends provide the 
best possible backing for his performance. 
This set could be very big. 



RARE PRECIOUS & BEAUTIFUL — VOL. 2 
Bee Gees — Atco SD 33-321 
This is the second collection of tracks re- 
corded several years ago before the Bee Gees 
became an internationally famous group. 
Like the beautiful butterfly which adorns the 
album cover, the set is something of a collec- 
tor’s item. Upon hearing it, one can tell where 
the Bee Gees were at back in Australia, yet, 
it is also an album for today, for its freshness 
and good spirits are undimmed. Special 
treats: “Everyday I Have To Cry” and the 
Barry Gibb tune “Follow The Wind.” LP 
should become a chart climber. 


I LOVE YOU - Eddie Holman — ABC 
ABCS 701 

The overwhelming success of Eddie Hol- 
man’s single, “Hey There Lonely Girl” in 
both pop and R&B markets, has resulted in 
a sizeable demand for this album, which has 
already been out for awhile and has just hit 
the charts. The set contains “Hey There 
Lonely Girl” and ten other goodies and should 
be making quite a showing in the coming 
weeks. 


nomum ereenbaum 
^ririt hf tlwsfcy' 



SPIRIT IN THE SKY — Norman Greenbaum 
— Reprise 6365 

Norman Greenbaum has a surprise single 
hit with “Spirit In The Sky,” and now the 
album bearing the title of the single is on the 
charts. A contemporary singer-songwriter, 
Greenbaum wrote all the tunes on the set, in- 
cluding “Spirit.” Should be plenteous sales in 
store for this package. Watch it rise. 



Pop Besi Bets 




SWEET BABY JAMES — James Taylor — 
WB 1843 

There has been a lot of talk about this singer 
and his songs. A contemporary folk-styled 
artist who employs some very tasteful backing 
— at times simple guitar work, at times a 
tight country-rock group, at times full brass 
orchestration, Taylor offers songs that are 
direct and sincere in an unpretentious, down- 
home style. A fine package that deserves at- 
tention. 



A SONG FOR ME — Family — Reprise 6384 

A diverse package from one of the topmost 
groups in England, this LP covers all fields. 
And it covers them because all five musicians 
are highly versatile on several instruments 
(vibes, violin, dobro, banjo and flute among 
them) . So there are country, jazz, folk and 
foreign influences added to Family’s basic 
rock style. There are both mellow ballads 
and up-tempo stuff that is bold and sensuous. 
Set could be active. 


UP FROM GEORGIA — Charlie Brown - 
Poly dor 24-4041 

Brown was the lead guitarist of the Broad- 
way “Hair” and has cut this album on which 
he plays all guitars, bass, harmonica and 
sings. Add to that the fact that he wrote nearly 
all the material and that makes it nearly a 
one-man show (David Lucas on percussion 
and keyboards made up the other half of the 
session). Brown has a potent country soul 
sound, so keep an ear open for this set. There 
is already some top airplay on it. 


BULL DURHAM SACKS & RAILROAD 
TRACKS — Ramblin’ Jack Elliot — Reprise 
6387 

The folk/country talent of Ramblin’ Jack 
Elliot has been on the scene for a long time 
and is captured honestly on this LP. He 
intros some songs with what is called “rapping 
and rambling ” which is simply what it implies 
— whitty and usually entertaining talking. 
The vocals and music are solid in style and 
he is successful in interpretation of material 
which includes some Dylan tunes as well as 
a Johnny Cash and Tim Hardin number to 
name a few. Could see chart action from 
various markets. 



BLESS YOU, DR. WOODWARD — Edison 
Electric Band — Cotillion SD 9022 

This four-man group makes an impres- 
sive debut with an album featuring ten tunes 
delivered in backroom fashion, utilizing elec- i 
trie piano, organ, drums and guitars. Vocal- I 
ists Rip Stock and T.J, Tindall are strong 
throughout on some excellent original ma- 
terial, and the other musicians are more than 
equal to the task, which in this case, seems 
to be creating distinctly listenable sound. 
Jazz and blues influences are present in this 
LP; its sound is unique enough to make it an 
item to consider for chart action. 


CRYING SONG - Hubert Laws — CTI 1002 
Flautist Hubert Laws is showcased on con- 
temporary material such as “Love Is Blue,” 
“Sing A Rainbow” and “I’ve Gotta Get A 
Message To You.” Basically, this is a jazz 
sound, but with pop overtones, largely due 
to the presence of a lush instrumental sec- 
tion. Rock numbers, “Peelin’ Alright” and 
“Let It Be” come together nicely and the 
whole package emerges as a strong outing for 
Laws and his group. Album could score with 
MOR listeners and well as jazz buffs. 


30 


Cash Box — February 28, 197C 






NO DEATH IN THE FAMILY 



Sordid History 

Just about a year ago, Family bobbed to 
the surface of the British group scene 
and were hailed by the futuristic ears of 
Reprise as the next major menace to our 
balance of trade. As sometimes happens, 
it turned out that those ears were set a 
bit farther into tomorrow than was at first 
realized. The group went through some 
changes, including a premature Ameri- 
can tour which almost ruined them. And 
the donation of a surplus bass player to 
Blind Faith. 

Lapping Waves 

Riper, leaner and wiser, Family re- 
grouped its forces in England and began 
stirring up waves which have lapped tan- 
talizingly at our shores for a number of 
months, now. The first swells hit July 7 of 
last year, when the Rolling Stones made 
the mistake of including Family in their 
Hyde Park Free Concert. This fs what the 
British press saw that afternoon: 

“Family ... proved themselves far better 
than the Stones or anyone else playing, 
particularly on their classics “How Hi the 
Lie” and “Dim.” —Disc and Music Echo 
“Ironically, the stars of the afternoon 
were not the Stones but Family, who got 
a roaring reception.” 

— The Financial Times 
“Family were as always good, harder on 
stage than on record. Veins standing out 
on his neck, Roger Chapman whipped 


himself into towel-flaying and mike-bash- 
ing passion — a bit cruel to the mikes 
who were appearing free as well.” 

—New Musical Express 

“Family drove the audience almost fran- 
tic with their visually and musically ex- 
citing act.” — Record Retailer 

“Family were one of the big musical suc- 
cesses of the afternoon.”— /We/ody Maker 

Hardly had we recovered from the 
drumming of this metaphoric surf than 
we were subjected to new rollers from 
the Isle of Wight, where England’s Wes- 
sex News paid far more attention to Fam- 
ily than to the nominal star of the show, 
Bob Dylan. To wit: 

“The Family probably gave the best 
performance of anyone over the whole 
weekend. Roger Chapman, the vocalist, 
looking as if he had been rather liberal 
with the speed, although friends tell me 
he’s always like that, managed, amaz- 
ingly, to keep most people awake and 
even warm at 1 o’clock in the morning. 
And with probably the most competent 
musicians outside Blind Faith behind 
him the Family proved themselves un- 
doubtedly as England’s top ‘rock’ group.” 

English Hit Makers 

“Aha!” you say, “but what about their 
records?” At our last count, their newest 
(and just released here by Reprise) al- 
bum, “A Song for Me,” had scooted into 
an impressive fourth spot on the British 


charts and their single, “No Mule’s Fool,” 
was threatening to overshadow it in 
those self-same realms. Last fall an 
American writer, John Loquidis, wrote in 
Chinook: 

“Family’s music belongs in a church. 
They are probably doing the finest work 
in rock as of now... They realize the 
electronic aspects of rock and the im- 
portance of the commercially market- 
able record.” 

Coincident with this marvelous new al- 
bum, Family is preparing to embark on 
a complete American tour, the first to re- 
sult from its present membership: Roger 
Chapman, John Whitney, Rob Townsend, 
John Weider and John Palmer plan to 
turn the following cities upside down in 
March: Chicago, Detroit, Boston, New 
York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

And that’s only the beginning. 


Family plays together on Reprise. 



FAMILY 






TRAVELIN’ HOME via the “Chicago Transit Authority” is the Columbia group 
Chicago who recently brought home the gold for that, their first LP. With their 
latest album, “Chicago" released only a month ago, it is already number 15 on 
this week’s CB chart. Making the presentation to the group is Clive Davis, label 
president. 


Goldman To Cut 
Puckett Solo LP 


Atlantic Inks Holler; 
Initial LP Due Soon 


HOLLYWOOD — Steve Goldman has 
been set to produce Gary Puckett’s 
first solo album for Columbia, with 
Roger Kellaway arranging and con- 
ducting the orchestra. 

Because of Puckett’s touring com- 
mittments with the Union Gap, the 
album will be recorded on both coasts 
during Puckett’s engagements at the 
Whisky A Go Go (Mar. 25-29) and the 
Copacabana (starting June 11). Puck- 
ett, in colaboration with Eddie Col- 
ville, will write several tunes for the 
album. 


NEW YORK — Producer-songwriter, 
Dick Holler, has signed a long-term 
recording contract with Atlantic Re- 
cords. Holler, the writer of last year’s 
major hit for Dion, “Abraham, Mar- 
tin and John", will be produced for 
Atlantic by Phil Gernhard, who also 
produced the Dion single as well as 
that artist’s current album, “Sit 
Down Old Friend.” Holler is expect- 
ed to go into the studio almost im- 
mediately on his first LP project. 
The album will be geared for release 
in the early summer. 


Anjoan Records 
First ABC Album 

NEW YORK — Henry Schwartz Man- 
agement’s Anjoan, recently signed 
to an exclusive ABC recording con- 
tract, has waxed her first album for 
the label. 

The disk, “Equal Time,” was 
aired in Los Angeles earlier this month 
by Bob Todd. It’s scheduled for a 
late March release. 


Master To Atco 

NEW YORK — Atco Records has ac- 
quired the master of “Never Love 
Again" by Holly Maxwell on the 
Smit-Whit label out of Philadelphia. 
The record began selling well in the 
Philadelphia-New Jersey area and 
has now spread to other markets. 
The distribution deal was made by 
Sam Whisant of SRS Enterprises and 
Atco v.p. in charge of promotion 
Henry Allen and head of pop promo- 
tion Jerry Greenberg. 



NOSTALGIC VISITOR — The display window of Korvette’s 5th Ave. store in 
New York is featuring the Ben Bagley Revisited series on Crewe Records coin- 
cidentally with the label’s campaign on the catalogue of Ben Bagley LP’s. 
Albums include Alan Jay Lerner, Cole Porter, Rogers & Hart and Vernon Duke. 



CJcnliBoK Album Reviews 




Pop Best Bets 


Jazz Picks 


FIRST IMPRESSIONS — Nancy Michaels — 
Reprise 6380 

Nancy Michaels is a talented young con- 
temporary singer-songwriter, and her first 
album, comprised entirely of her own songs, 
could gain her a following. Her lyrics are 
sensitive and poetic, and her melodies are 
graceful and well constructed. She may well 
become an artist to reckon with. 


GLIDING BIRD — Emmy Lou Harris — 
Jubilee JGS 8031 

Emmy Lou Harris debuts with an album 
which shows her to be a very good singer 
and a talented songwriter. Her kyle is a com- 
posite of contemporary, folk and country, 
and she blends all her influences very well. In 
addition to her own tunes, she offers a vari- 
ety of others, among them Bob Dylan’s “I’ll 
Be Your Baby Tonight," Hank Williams’ 
“I Saw The Light," Fred Neil’s “Everybody’s 
Talkin’,” and Bacharach-David’s “Til Never 
Fall In Love Again." This album merits 
careful attention. 



THE BEST OF THE MODERN JAZZ QUAR- 
TET — Atlantic SD 1546 

How can the best of the MJQ be put on one 
record you ask. Well, the Atlantic people, as 
part of their Jazz Anthology series, have at- 
tempted that task and come up with quite an 
album. The contents reads like a list of 
jazz’s greatest recordings: “Fontessa,” “The 
Golden Striker, ” “Bags’ Groove,” “Django,” 
“Sketch,” and “Pyramid.” These are the 
original recordings of the numbers which 
helped to make the MJQ one of the most re- 
knowned jazz ensembles in the world. This 
is most definitely an album with sales poten- 
tial. 


tffiRKnfflfgi STiinif«K STONE FLUTE — Herbie Mann — Embryo — 

SD520 

Here is a truly outstanding LP featuring 
flute player extraordinaire Herbie Mann and 
a host of fine musicians including bassist 
Ron Carter. With the assistance of some 
string instrumentation, the Mann sound ex- 
cels on original material such as “Paradise 
Beach" and “Miss Free Spirit,” as well as on 
the haunting song “In Tangier" and Lennon- 
McCartney’s “Flying." Quite a remarkable 
^ album, and one which could do very well 

saleswise, so watch it carefully. 


Ctassicai Picks. 


WILLIAM TELL - FAVORITE OVERTURES j 
— Bernstein New York Philharmonic — Co- ‘ 
lumbia D3S 818 

Leonard Bernstein and the New York Phil- 
harmonic interpret eighteen overtures on this 
3-record set. In addition to the title favorite 
by Rossini, the LP includes Tchaikovsky’s 
“1812 Overture,” Bizet’s overture to “Car- 
men," Bernstein’s overture to “Candide” and 
a host of others. Package should be a favorite 
in classical circles. 


HANDEL; JEPTHA — Johannes Somary/ 
Amor Artis Chorale/English Chamber Or- 
chestra/Reri Grist/Maureen Forester/Helen 
Watts/Alexander Young/John Lawrenson/ 
Simon Woolf — Cardinal VCS 10077/8/9 
This is the first recording of “Jeptha,” Han- 
del’s last oratorio (and, according to Winston 
Dean, the composer’s “last work of any im- 
portance"). Based on a chapter from the 
Book of Judges in the Bible, “Jeptha” tells 
the story of an Israelite warrior in exile. Fine 
performances all around make for an album 
which all devotees of Handel will want to 
hear. 




32 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 






SWEET HENRY 

recorded 
PAUL SIMONAS 



and people love it . • . 


produced by Tim O^Brien 



Paramount Records/ a division of Famous Music Corporation/ 
A G "hW Company 


NEW YORK 

In The Beginning There Was ‘Hair’ 


HAIR ushered in the new age of 
musical theatre. Well ... at least it 
was supposed to have that effect. 
Somewhere, between then and now, 
nobody found the right direction. 

It is very strange, almost paradox- 
ical, that musical theatre has not 
made great strides in the past several 
years. This period has been a time of 
great creativity in music coupled with 
the development of a wide and recep- 
tive audience for new musical con- 
cepts. It has also been a time during 
_ which the availability of forums, 
whether they be records, television, 
radio, film or even the theatre, has 
never been broader. But nothing has 
really happened in the musical the- 
atre which approaches the creative 
advances in other media. 

Some may argue that HAIR didn’t 
do anything really special in terms 
of musical theatre. After all, it’s just 
another one of those non-book, free- 
form musicals that just happened at 
the right time with some excellent 
music. But HAIR was more than that. 
Most importantly, it broke down the 
- old barriers between popular music 
and show music. It is musical the- 
atre without “show music.” Rock 
music yet! 

More than that, HAIR is musical 


theatre written for a non-musical 
theatre audience. Who would have 
ever thought you could stage a suc- 
cessful musical without those lucra- 
tive Hadassah and League of Women 
Voters theatre parties in mind. The 
producers of HAIR obviously did. 
But that’s because HAIR is not what 
you would call a “musical comedy.” 
It didn’t need theatre parties. It creat- 
ed a new musical theatre audience 
and managed to enthrall a sizeable 
portion of the traditional musical com- 
edy crowd as well with its exuberance 
and its very theatrical presentation of 
what is going down today. That’s a 
damn nice place for a fresh concept 
of musical theatre to take off. 

The take off, unfortunately, has been 
delayed. Instead of refining and pol- 
ishing the form, our “new” musical 
theatre has done nothing except level 
off in an attempt to come up with 
something that has the look and feel, 
and especially the commercial suc- 
cess, of HAIR. More often than not, 
we are presented with non-book, non- 
theatrical showcases of rock music 
trying to pass themselves off as the- 
atre. It’s not working. Two examples 
are the recently shuttered “Ex- 
change” and Oscar Brown’s “Joy,” 
currently holding forth at the New 



Ten Years After 


Barbara Barton 


W.F. Handel 


Theatre. 

Both productions have some fine 
music, excellently performed by those 
involved with the shows. Neither was 
tied together with anything closely 
resembling a book, but rather by 
loosely conceived, currently modish 
concepts of brotherhood, human kind- 
ness, anti-war sentiment, the horror 
of assassination, etc. These are mu- 
sical showcases, cabaret reviews, not 
theatre. A few pieces of dialogue here 
and there or some limited choreog- 
raphy do not raise such productions 
to the level of theatre. But, we are 
bound to see more and more show- 
cases such as these because of the 
lack of definition in musical theatre. 

It is really amazing that, given the 
depth of talent available on record 
today, we have not seen more viable 
musical theatre pieces produced. 
There is ultimately more theatrical 
worth in fully conceived recordings 
such as “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely 
Hearts Club Band,” “Their Satanic 
Majesties Request,” “Arthur,” and, 
most certainly, the rock opera 
“Tommy” than almost any produc- 
tion that has been mounted under the 
guise of musical theatre since HAIR 
first saw the klieg lights turned on. 


In discussing new forms of musical 
theatre, essentially, we are concerned 
with the theatre that will be created 
by young people utilizing current or 
even futuristic modes of music. The 
HELLO DOLLY/FIDDLER ON THE 
ROOF type of musical will be with 
us as long as the “musical comedy” 
audience keeps going to the theatre 
which probably means forever. That’s 
fine. But, HELLO DOLLY is not going 
to satisfy the new musical audiences 
which HAIR brought into theatres. 

It is even more bewildering that no 
valuable piece of social commentary 
in the form of musical theatre has 
evolved in these times. The young 
musical creators are certainly in- 
volved in all of the pressing social, 
political and ecological problems of 
the day, yet not one of them has put 
together in theatrical form, a mean- 
ingful musical presentation on any of 
these themes. 

Well-written songs, without more, do 
not make a workable theatrical pre- 
sentation. There have to be a lot of 
other threads which tie the entire pro- 
duction together. Little things like, 
say, a book, or some semblance there- 
of: an overriding concept to the pro- 

(Con't on Pg. 36) 


HOLLYWOOD 

Let It Eat 



Santana 


Blood, Sweat & Tears 


The Grass Roots 


Criterion Music is obviously on some 
sort of ‘image’ drive since they’ve 
been deluging us with letters and re- 
leases to remind us that despite the 
success of their Hawaiian catalog, 
which includes standards from Don Ho 
and Alfred Apaka, they are also in 
the mainstream of the contemporary 
revolution, with such writers as Lee 
Hazlewood and newly-signed Jackson 
Browne. They also have French pub- 
lishing rights to Fred Neil’s standards, 
as well as all of Creedence’s material. 




ALIVE AND WELL: Randy Newman 
intro’s his second Reprise album in a 
one week gig at the Troubadour . . . 
Jack Elliot, also out with a new Re- 
prise album, at the Ash Grove, with 
WB artists Levitt & McLure . . . San- 
tana and Elvin Bishop in concert at 
the Santa Monica Civic on Saturday 


(28) . . . And, for you TV fans, you can 
catch Ringo Starr guesting on Laugh- 
In tonight. 

A1 Schmitt, who’s now running his 
own disk firm. Pentagram, picked up 
two RIAA gold disks for his produc- 
tion on two Jefferson Airplane albums, ; 
“Crown Of Creation” and “Volun- 
teers.” 

Recently disbanded Checkmates Ltd. 
get together for a one-night only shot 
at former member Bobby Stevens’ 
Checkmate Inn in Palo Alto . . . 5th 
Dimension guest act on “It Takes A 
Thief” tonight, and start a month long 
college tour prior to their April 30 
opening at Caesar’s Palace . . . Blood, 
Sweat & Tears have set a 28-date 
spring concert sked, kicking off on 
Feb. 27 in Salt Lake City. Does that 1. 
mean they’ve finished their long- 
awaited LP? 


(Con’t on Pg. 36) 


“Why must album covers be so 
perverted,” asks a reader from Des 
Moines. “God knows there’s enough 
temptation in the world around us, 
without having it thrown into our faces 
as we browse through the record 
racks.” 

Our indignant reader was specif- 
ically complaining about the cover 
on the latest Rolling Stones album, 
“Let It Bleed,” which he claims, 
“depicts a fully unclad strawberry 
shortcake.” It seems our outraged 
friend has a serious weight problem, 
which, through aid from his local 
pastor, he thought he finally had 
under control. “But when I saw that 
cover,” he writes, “desire overcame 
me, and I shamed myself in the 
bakery department in front of almost 
the entire Weight Watcher’s Club.” 

And the Blind Faith cover, con- 
sidered too offensive for many stores, 
has been nominated for a Grammy. 
What else is new! 

^ j{! :5{ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

“Guerrilla bands swept through the 
corridors of the Warner/Reprise Bur- 
bank headquarters, raping accoun- 


CHICAGO 


Rumor has it that the Kinetic Play- 
ground will re-open the end of this 
month. Club was all but completely 
destroyed in a fire last fall . . . Sig 
Sakowicz taped an interview with 
Lenny Dee at the latter’s club in St. 
Petersburg, Fla. last week for airing 
on WGN. The Decca star will shortly 
wax his 30th album . . . New staffer 
in the Liberty-UA promo department 
is Gary Branson ... A brand new club, 
The Five Stages, debuts in Logan 


tants and knifing and shooting offi- 
cials of the dying regime, their rough- 
shod feet slipping slightly on the un- 
familiar texture of linoleum. After a 
bloody battle on the stairway between 
the first and second floors, a motley 
crew of the invaders gained access to 
the main fuse box of the building. 
Lights flickered and record players 
slowed, then died. By the time the 
emergency power was restored, the 
foreign crew had taken the President’s 
office and proclaimed a new chief 
executive for the record company: Mo 
Ostin. They also proclaimed a new 
executive 'Vice President, Joe Smith. 
The coup (pronounced coo) had suc- 
ceeded ...” 

The above inside story of the recent 
management changeover at Warners/ 
Reprise was boldly lifted from “Cir- 
cular,” the label’s house and country 
newsletter, for the benefit of our 
readers. If you’d like more inside mu- 
sic biz news. Circular is available, in 
a bi-weekly edition probably free, 
from the friendly people in Burbank. 
Just drop them a short resume. (A 
Diner’s Club or Carte Blanche ap- 
plication, fully filled out, will do) . 


Square 2/21. Opening bill will spot- 
light Oliver and the Hardy Boys . . . 
Got the word from CMA’s Budd Carr 
that Don Cooper, who has a new Rou- 
lette album in the making, will do a 
return engagement at It’s Here 
2/27-3/1 . . . The Nile Train will be 
back at the Rush Up the first two 
weeks in March. Roulette will short- 
ly release the group’s debut single . . . 
Mason Proffit, who appeared on the 
Delaney Bonnie & Friends bill in the 
Auditorium Theater last Saturday, 
have just completed a new LP, pro- 
duced by Dunwich’s Bill Traut. 
Firm’s Jim Golden tells us negotia- 


tions with several labels are currently 
underway for the release of the pack- 
age ... A & M’s promo man Mike 
Leventon hosted a private screening 
of “Watermelon Man,” directed by 
A & M recording artist Melvin Van 
Peebles and starring Godfrey Cam- 
bridge and Estelle Parsons . . . 

Rolling Stone promoter Mike Quatro, 
who presented Chicago’s first indoor 
Woodstock festival at the Aragon a 
few weeks back, has set up a 10-15 • 
cities schedule of similar events, in 
association with Russ Gibb owner of 
the Grande Ballroom in Detroit. A 
wide range of talent, including Top 40, 


underground and local artists, will be 
featured at the various shows. Quatro 
also recently announced that he has 
taken on managerial duties for Van- 
guard artists The Frost and is in the 
process of setting up a series of nation- 
al dates for them . . . New bill in Mis- 
ter Kelly’s spotlights Frances Faye 
and comedian Scoey Mitchell opening 
February 23 . . . Liberty-UA promo 
man Paul Diamond tops his plug list 
with the new Ferrante & Teicher 
coupling “Theme From Z” b/w “Lay 
Lady Lay” (UA), “Swan Lake” by 
The Ventures (Liberty) and “Brighton 
Hill” by Jackie DeShannon (Imperial) . 


34 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


IdJ 

UNITED 

ARTISTS 


United Artiefs Recopde 




THANK YOU D J’S 
OF AMERICA 
FOR THE HEAVY 
TOP 40 AIR PLAY.” 


Entertaimnent from 
Tranaamerica Corporation 


Jay & The Americans 
“Walkin’ In The Rain” 
#50605 

b/w “(I’d Kill) For The 

Love Of A Lady'' 

produced by Sandy Yaguda 
and Thomas Kaye 
for data Enterprises, Inc. 

arranged by Thomas Kaye 

Over 700,000 
copies sold ! 


.99 


Little Anthony 
& The Imperials 

“Don’t Get Close’ 
#50625 

b/w “It’ll Never Be The 
Same Again” 

produced by Bob Skaff with 
the assistance of George Butler 
and 

Little Anthony A The Imperials 
arranged by Horace Ott 

Getting Top 40 air play 
in Chicago, St. Louis, 
Charlotte & Pittsburgh 


Ferrante & Teicher 
“The Theme From‘Z’ ” 
#50646 

b/w “Lay Lady Lay” 
produced by George Butler 

arranged by 
Ferrante A Teicher 

Just released... 
destined to be bigger 

than their “Midnight 
Cowboy” single 


.99 


Bobbi Martin 
“For The Love Of 
#50602 

b/w “I Think Of Him” 

produced by Henry Jerome 
arranged by Don Tweedy 

Over 11,000 sold in 
only 4 days! Getting 
Top 40 air play in 
Phiiadelphia on 
WFIL, WIBG, WPEN & WIP 



Producer's Profile 


g!^iiiii«ir insights Sk Sounds 


NEW YORK (Con't. from Page 34) 


duction rather than just a song show- 
case; more direction than what we’ve 
been getting in musical theatre which 
seems to amount to something like 
“You . . . with the guitar; you stand 
here for your first song and there for 
the second,” etc. 

The situation demands study of 
theatrical form by those who want to 
write for the musical theatre. This is 
no plea for a totally naturalistic the- 
atre of music. Formalism is not the 
problem. The door is certainly not 
closed to non-naturalistic musicals. 
But perhaps the door should be closed 
on supposed musical theatre pieces 
that actually belong in a cabaret or on 
a record. 


‘WINTERSEND’ IN THE SUN 

Pop festivals, the giant Woodstock 
included, have had one very disturb- 
ing feature in common. None of them 
have really been prepared to handle 
the crowds that attend. Now there 
seem to be some promoters around 
who have learned from past bad ex- 
periences. The promoting organiza- 
tion, Concerts Incorporated, made up 
of a group of national promoters, 
have scheduled a major pop festival 
for Easter weekend, March 27, 28 & 29, 
at a site 15 miles from Miami. 

The festival has been named “Win- 
tersend” and boasts a super talent 
line-up including, thus far. Ten Years 
After, Joe Cocker, Country Joe & The 
Fish, B. B. King, John Mayall, Can- 
ned Heat, Johnny Winter, Richie 
Havens, Ike & Tina Turner, Moun- 
tain, Little Richard, Sweetwater and 
Steve Miller. But, the most important 
feature of “Wintersend,” setting it 
apart from other mammoth festivals 
is the sophisticated logistical planning 
that has gone into it. 

First of all, it is being held on a 
650 acre site which will be opened to 
ticket holders one full week before the 
festival begins. There will be two rec- 
reation areas, each complete with show- 
ers, water troughs, barbecue pits, 
concessions, bazaars, a medical fac- 
ility and a general store. And each 
area will serve free, that’s right free, 
food 24 hours a day. In addition, films 
will be shown each night from 3; 00 AM 
to 6; 00 AM. 

“Wintersend’s” planners have taken 
into consideration the fact that there 
will be a lot of kids on Easter recess 
and have even gone so far as to pro- 
vide, through a travel agent, round 
trip bus transportation from major 
northeastern colleges at a discount. 
Tickets will be sold for the entire three 
day concert only, not on a day to day 
basis. Price is $20. For ticket info, 
you can write to Concert Hall Publi- 
cations, Box 34, Flourtown, Pa. 19031. 
Sunny Schnier is handling the publicity 
for the event. Now, it looks like the 
only problem the promoters are going 
to have is getting all of the people to 
leave the festival site. 


EAST COAST GIRL OF THE WEEK 

That lovely little thing luxuriating 
in the director’s chair is our ECGW, 
Barbara Barton. Barbara’s is the 
soft, purring happy voice you will hear 
if you happen to call Universal Attrac- 
tions. Now you can see what’s behind 
the voice. 

But Barbara does a hell of a lot 
more than purr into telephone re- 
ceivers. First of all, she has danced 
professionally. Take another look at 
her picture. You might remember her 
now. She was one of the discotheque 
dancers who was responsible for draw- 
ing those leering crowds that used to 
gather daily on the sidewalk in front 
of ‘.he Metropole before it went top- 
less. 

Barbara’s focus has changed some- 
what since her dancing days (she was 
forced into retirement by the disco- 


theque dancer’s peculiar malady, pulled 
stomach muscles) . Since then, she has 
done a lot of promotional and adver- 
tising work in her spare time for 
friends in the music and film business. 
If she had her choice, Barbara told us, 
she would like to be a Peter Gennaro 
dancer. Secondly, and more practically, 
she would probably like to get into 
promotion or advertising work in a 
much more substantial way. Just imag- 
ine having that voice around your ad 
agency all day. Enough to drive you 
out of your mind. 


FORGOTTEN CANADIANS 

What happens . . . you write a lead 
story (last week’s, “Remember Ca- 
nada?”) and try to give the Dominion 
a little action; try to bring them out 
of the dark ages and all of a sudden, 
you get a bunch of letters saying, “Hey, 
what about this guy, he’s from Canada 
too.” The letters only go to prove that 
artists from Canada seem to lose 
their national identity when they work 
here. Those we missed, among others, 
are Steppenwolf, Denny Doherty, Neil 
Young, Gene Cornish, The Irish 
Rovers, Lighthouse, Oscar Band, Skip 
of Moby Grape, McKenna-Mendelson 
Mainline, Motherlode and Rolf Kempf 
who wrote “Hello Hooray” recorded 
by Judy Collins. We hope Canada for- 
gives our oversights. 

YIP HARBURG ON THEATRE 

In line with this week’s lead article 
concerning musical theatre, E. Y. “Yip” 
Harburg (remember “Finian’s Rain- 
bow” ... he co-wrote it) will be dis- 
cussing theatre this Friday (27) on 
radio station WQXR, NY, on “Chap- 
pell’s Broadway.” Harburg is one of 
the creators to whom young writers 
should turn for guidance. He was writ- 
ing meaningful musical theatre with 
socio-economic themes more than 20 
years ago Harburg will be talking 
about “Flahooey,” a play which is 
probably unknown to most of today’s 
theatre audience. Judging from the 
shape of musical theatre now, we could 
probably use a revival of “Flahooey.” 

SHORT TAKES 

The CB offices will be closed Mon- 
day, ostensibly to celebrate the birth 
of the father of our country ... a 
big job even in those days. However, 
we here in the plush CB tower will 
actually be celebrating the birthdays, 
this week, of G.F. Handel (you’ll re- 
member his hit, “The Messiah”), 
Frederic Chopin and Enrico Caruso 
. . . Granting our east coast offices 
equal time, Elaine Rubin stopped in 
to say hello, put in a good word for 
new LP by 'Them on Happy Tiger, 
and tell us that she is currently doing 
free lance publicity work. Elaine is 
so pretty, that it’s difficult not to 
listen to whatever she’s promoting. 
She can be reached at 877-4931. 

The gross receipts at Sly’s recent 
Madison Square Garden gig (13) were 
$104,000, with 21,000 seats sold. A 
sell-out. Last time the gross got that 
high was the Moratorium benefit. 
Sid Bernstein produced both shows. 
Sid, maybe you ought to start looking 
for a bigger room . . . The Holy Mod- 
al Rounders, Elektra artists, have 
written and will perform the music 
for Sam Shepherd’s play “Operation 
Sidewinder” which opens at Lincoln 
Center, March 12th. Shepherd, inci- 
dentally, who is one of the best young 
playwrights around today, used to be 
a member of The Holy Modal Rounders 
. . . “The House Of Leather,” an ante- 
bellum rock musial written by Dale 
Menten, will be opening on the 16th of 
March at the Ellen Stewart Theatre, 
240 E. 3rd St. instead of the Academy 
of l^usic as originally announced 
. . .'■tj'he Association will headline 
the finale of a 3-day benefit at the 
Felt Forum on March 1st. 

Due to the great demand for Ten 
Years After, Fillmore East added 



GEORGE TOBIN 


George Tobin was one of the first 
(if not the first) producers to use the 
“what’il we call our group of studio 
musicians today” concept of record 
producing. Though he still feels it was 
valid at the time, his own experience 
and the changing music scene has 
made him reject the ‘bubble-gum’ 
philosophy for today’s market. 

Even when he was busy selling three 
sides by the same group (his own) 
to three different companies. Tobin 
made sure that each firm knew up 
front that they were only buying a rec- 
ord, and not a group. “Honesty with 
A&R guys is the only thing that lets you 
back into their offices when your first 
deal bombs,” was Tobin’s viewpoint. 
“Today, people are more anxious to 
make long-term deals rather than 
just buy masters off the street.” 

While most producer’s look forward 
to earning their own labels after a 
solid string of successes, Tobin started 
out with his own label, Brahma, distri- 
buted by Atlantic, before he was a prod- 
ucer. "It was a chance meeting with 
Ahmet Ertegun,” said Tobin. “He heard 
some of my songs, liked them, and 
offered me a label deal. It didn’t work 
out.” 

“1 really learned the production ropes 
when I signed a deal with Red Schwartz 
and Morris Levy of Roulette, and I 
learned about the business from hang- 


another 2 performances this Thursday 
(26) . . . Serious R n’R and R&B dis- 
cophiles now have a publication to 
interest them. It’s called RECORD 
EXCHANGER and features articles 
and complete discographies of vintage 
stars. Anyone who is interested should 
write Box 2144, Anaheim, Cal. 92804 
. . . Bobby Sherman, with 2 gold 
singles under his belt for Metromedia 


ing around the B&G coffee shop at 
1650 Broadway. 1 gained so much con- 
fidence at Roulette that I quit my 
regular job.” 

After a series of small hits, Tobin 
opened his own offices at 1650. “That’s 
when all the guys I used to hang around 
with in the coffee shop started hang- 
ing around my offices instead. We be- 
came a sort of unofficial production 
complex.” 

“After you’ve been in the business 
a number of years you can get in to 
see people and you can talk them into 
things that they might not particularly 
want, but they’ll take a shot with you, 
and a lot of times they’ll make money. 
On the other hand, there are times when 
the fact that you’ve been around so long 
makes companies hesitant.” 

Tobin found lots of hesitation when he 
was trying to sell a master he wrote 
and co-produced. 13 companies turned 
the disk down, before Harold Berkman, 
then with Bang Records, decided 
to give it a shot. For a long time, it 
looked as though those companies had 
the right idea, but suddenly, after 12 
weeks of hard work by Berkman and 
Tobin, the record took off. “Cinnamon” 
introduced a new artist, Derek, and 
gave Tobin his first Top 10 hit. 1969 
also brought other chart offerings to 
Tobin in the form of Derek’s follow-up, 
“Back Door Man,” and a smash record 
in England with Gene Pitney’s “Some- 
where In The Country.” 

As with most other successful produ- 
cers, conglomeration entered Tobin’s 
world in the form of a TIC purchase 
of his Pint Size Productions. “People 
complain about the red tape at big 
record companies, but at least the 
people at record companies are in the 
music business. At the conglomerates, 
you’re dealing strictly with a group of 
accountants who have no concept of 
the business,” and that was too much 
to take for a free-wheeling spirit like 
Tobin. So he has severed his connections 
and gone back on the indie trail. 

Since his split from TIC, Tobin has 
lined up deals with Mercury for several 
artists, placed Ivory Hudson with AlP, 
has a Buddy Randell (formerly of the 
Knickerbockers) version of “Be My 
Baby” coming out on Uni, and is work- 
ing with two new groups. Bazooka who’ve 
just signed with White Whale, and the 
Brooklyn Symphony. 


Records, will be honored at a luncheon 
this week (24). Metromedia, fearing 
that the singer would be besieged by 
fans, has kept the name of the restau- 
rant secret. For all Bobby Sherman 
fans out there, it’s a Fench restau- 
rant run by a guy with a jewish name 
. . . Congratulations to publicist Mary 
Jane on the birth of a 7 lb. baby boy 
last week. 


HOLLYWOOD (Con't from Page 34) 


ALSO ALIVE & WELL are Belland & 
Somerville, former lead singers for 
the Four Preps and the Diamonds, 
who’ re currently occupying the Ice 
House in Pasadena thru Mar. 1. 

Bob Stone, production manager for 
Racle Music (part of the Oracle Pro- 
ductions complex) excited about the 
forthcoming release of “The Appoint- 
ment,” with Omar Sharif and Anouk 
Aimee which features two tunes he 
co-wrote with Stu Phillips, “Solo 
E’Triste” and “The Beauty of Begin- 
ning.” 

Gayle McCormick has rejoined 
Smith, but the lead guitarist has left 
. . . Linda Tillery has given up her 
life as Sweet Linda Devine to rejoin 
the Loading Zone . . . Now, if only 
Janis would rejoin Big Brother. 

Spirit returned from a European 
tour to find that their current hit, 
“1984,” was pulled off the Drake sta- 
tions because Drake found the disk 
personally objectionable. 

The Grass Roots and Merrilee Rush 
will be the first artists set for “Pre- 
senting ...” a projected series of 
mini-specials . . . The Herb Alpert 
“Brass Are Cornin’ ” special to be re- 
aired by NBC on Apr. 7 . . . Johnnie 
Ray will appear in a concert series 
for the benefit of the HEAR Founda- 
tion this spring . . . Mike Curb’s 


Congregations to make their video 
debut on Thurs., joining Andy 
Williams, Jose Feliciano, Liza 
Minnelli and others on the “Movin’ ” 
special on CBS. 

It’s Atlantic’s week in San Fran- 
cisco. Delaney & Bonnie & Friends 
featuring Eric Clapton (imagine what 
would happen if they started billing all 
the friends), along with the New York 
Rock & Roll Ensemble and Golden 
Earrings, are all at the Fillmore 
West, while Sonny & Cher open a 
stand at the Fairmont Hotel. The Ear- 
rings, when Last we heard, were also 
booked for a Whisky date this week, 
duction rather than just a song show- 
case; more direction than what we’ve 
been getting in musical theatre which 
seems to amount to something like 
“You . . . with the guitar; you stand 
here for your first song and there for 
the second,” etc. 

The situation demands study of 
theatrical form by those who want to 
write for the musical theatre. This is 
no plea for a totally naturalistic 
theatre of music. Formalism is not 
the problem. The door is certainly not 
closed to non-naturalistic musicals. 
But perhaps the door should be closed 
on supposed musical theatre pieces 
that actually belong in a cabaret or on 
a record. 


36 


Cash Box — February'28, 1970 



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fill 
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On Ampex Records 


lAMPEX 

RECORDS 

555 Madison Avenue • New York, N.Y 10022 




ItCA Streamlines Reorganization 

(Con’t. from Page 7) 


maximum utilization of manpower 
and talent. Its inherent characteristics 
are extreme flexibility and expansi- 
bility of personnel responsibilities 
rather than limiting them as most 
traditional organization charts do.” 

Each of the product lines will draw 

Name Abramson 
At Command/Probe 

NEW YORK — Command/Probe Rec- 
ords has named Rick Abramson to 
serve as national promo mgr. for both 
labels. Abramson, previous to his 
Command/Probe appointment, was a 
field promotion man with Heritage 
and Colossus Records. During his 18 
month tenure there he worked on rec- 
ords by Bill Deal & the Rhondells, 
Shannon, Shocking Blue and the Tee 
Set. 

He will be working closely with 
Charlie Trepel, national sales mana- 
ger, Ron Kreitzman, West Coast man- 
ager and Jimmy Shaw, manager of 
singles sales. Abramson is filling the 
post Carl Deane vacated recently to 
accept another opportunity. 


Famous Names Boisom 
As Publicity Director 

NEW YORK — Famous Music Corp. 
has appointed Rick Boisom director of 
publicity, with responsibility for all 
PR activity of the company and its 
Paramount, Dot and Steed labels. 

Before joining Famous, Boisom was 
PR director for Bizarre, Inc., handling 
publicity for the Straight and Bizarre 
labels. Prior to that he handled PR for 
Mercury Records. 


MGM’s Bloomfield Plant 
Gears For More Business 

NEW YORK — The MGM Records’ 
pressing plant in Bloomfield, New 
Jersey, is stepping up its drive for ex- 
tra custom pressing business, accord- 
ing to David J. Jacobson, president of 
the MGM Merchandising Corp., who 
has jurisdiction over the Bloomfield 
plant and all custom sales. 

In line with expansion, Frank Coc- 
chiaraley. General manager of the 
Bloomfield factory, has named Barry 
Ruegg as director of customer ser- 
vice, Ed Budd as director of physical 
distribution and Art Fitzharris as dir- 
ector of manufacturing. 

Cocchiaraley and Barry Ruegg noted 
that the MGM Record factory in 
Bloomfield is equipped to handle every 
type custom job for singles and al- 
bums from start to finish. In the case 
of LP’s, the factory has sources which 
can supply album cover art, printing, 
labels, jacketing and shrink wrappings. 

The Bloomfield Pressing Plant is 
equipped to produce in excess of 
150,000 long play and single records 
per day. 

The factory is strategically located 
in the Metropolitan North Jersey In- 
dustrial area at 120 Arlington Avenue, 
Bloomfield, New Jersey and has im- 
mediate access to all Airlines via 
nearby Newark Airport, as well as 
truck and rail transportation. 

An extra added service which the 
custom record department can supply 
is direct mailings to radio stations 
throughout the country. The custom 
record division is geared to give 24 
hour service. 


Stax Appoints Shaw 

MEMPHIS — Stax Records has named 
Lawrence Shaw, Jr. as advertising 
and creative director. A pioneer in 
the establishment of the first black 
owned and operated national account- 
billing advertising agency, Vince Cul- 
lers Advertising, Inc. Chicago, Illinois, 
Shaw was the agency’s first Art Dir- 
ector. 

His most recent position with Vince 
Cullers was that of Broadcast Dir- 
ector, where he produced such well 
known radio commercials as “The 
Bold Sou! In The Blue Dashike” for 
Newport cigarettes and “Wantu Wa- 
zuri Beautiful People” for Johnson 
Products Company’s Afro Sheen. 


on the resources of RCA Records’ ser- 
vices — advertising, marketing, pub- 
lic affairs, business affairs, etc. 

Laginestra said that through the 
product areas each with an exec re- 
porting directly to him the company 
would have a greater degree of spe- 
cialization in the coordinated creation 
and merchandising of product. “With 
one man in charge of each area from 
conception through creation and on to 
merchandising, we will be able to 
have faster decisions at a time in in- 
dustry history when such decisions 
are mandatory. In addition it will 
make possible more effective com- 
munication with our artists having a 
single point of contact. That man, with 
the responsibility of making his area 
profitable, will be accountable to me 
for an operation that achieves that 
profitability.” 




NARM Confab Sets 
A ‘ Joy’-ous Affair 

NEW YORK — “Joy”, the off-Broad- 
way hit, will be presented in a spec- 
ially-produced concert form at the 
Opening Night Dinner Party of the 12th 
Annual NARM Convention on Friday, 
March 20. RCA Records, which re- 
cently issued the original cast album, 
is host for the evening. This will mark 
the first time such an entertainment 
will be presented for the merchandi- 
sers and manufacturers industry 
group. 

Oscar Brown, “Joy’s” creator, and 
Jean Pace, who also perform in “Joy”, 
are joined by Sivuca. The Browns, 
Sivuca, and an additional nine per- 
formers are being brought to Florida 
for the NARM Convention show. Last 
week, Oscar Brown and RCA A&R 
department representatives were in 
Florida, conferring with Americana 
Hotel officials on special sound, stage, 
and light requirements for the per- 
formance. The label has just issued a 
single from the show,. “What is a Fri- 
end” and “A New Generation.” 

Preceding the dinner party at which 
“Joy” will be presented, Warner 
Brothers Records hosts the Presiden- 
tial Welcoming Cocktail Party. More 
than 1100 record and tape industry 
members and their wives will attend. 


Dennon Exits TIDC 

SEATTLE — Jerry Dennon has re- 
signed his position as general mana- 
ger of Transcontinental Distributing 
Corp's Seattle outlet. Dennon has or- 
ganized the distributorship in May of 
1969. 

Since the inception Dennon has 
worked only on a part-time and con- 
sultant basis inasmuch as he heads a 
diversified company of his own. Jer- 
den Music, Inc. Jerden’s activities in- 
clude four publishing companies, a 
management firm, as well as being an 
active record and commercial produc- 
tion house with artists on A&M, Parrot, 
Forward, Atlantic, etc. 

Dennon will return to full-time sta- 
tus with Jerden Music, Inc. A1 Zan- 
grillo, branch manager of Transcon- 
tinental Music in Seattle assumes the 
managership of TDC-Seattle with Den- 
non exiting. 


Seek Govt. Bootlegging Laws 

(Con’t. from Page 7) 


Downey indicated that Senator Ted 
Kennedy of Massachusetts was inter- 
ested in such legislation and suggested 
that with proper direction from mem- 
bers of the industry, a bill might be 
formulated that could possibly be 
brought before a congressional com- 
mittee before mid-year. He asked that 
members of the industry attend this 
meeting so that he could become more 
familiar with the bootlegging problem 


Crewe Re-Signs Oliver 
To Long-Term Renewal 

NEW YORK — A long-term renewal 
contract with Oliver has been set up 
with Crewe Records. The young sing- 
ing star took down two gold singles 
within six months of 1969: “Good 
Morning Starshine” and “Jean.” Both 
are included in his current LP, “Good 
Morning Starshine.” 

A new single by Oliver is being re- 
leased late this week, and the artist 
has also just completed recording a 
new LP, for release in March. A re- 
cent headlining participant during the 
opening international gala at MIDEM, 
and during a champagne supper and 
gala hosted during MIDEM by Crewe 
as well, Oliver is now set for an ex- 
tended overseas tour of concert-tele- 
vision engagements and promotional 
appearances. 

He arrives in England Mar. 18 for a 
heavy schedule of TV and promotional 
appearances in connection with the 
Pye Records release there of “Jean,” 
under an arrangement just concluded 
by Crewe for exclusive British distri- 
bution of its product through Pye. 
During his tour which also encom- 

asses appearances oh the continent, 

e will re-record “Jean” in Italian, 
French and German. 

On Mar. 23, Oliver flies on to the 
Far East for a series of engagements 
in Australia and Japan before resum- 
ing his busy schedule of college and 
club engagements in the United States. 


O’Brien To Produce On 
Coast For Famous 

LOS ANGELES — Famous Music 
Corporation has appointed Tim 
O’Brien as manager of independent 
production and a producer on the 
West Coast for the Paramount and 
Dot labels. 

O’Brien has spent the last two and 
a half years with the Columbia Rec- 
ords organization as a producer, work- 
ing out of both New York and Los 
Angeles. 

His credits include the Chambers 
Brothers’ two most recent LP’s, as 
well as four sets with John Davidson. 
He also produced Flavor and a soon- 
to-be-released LP by High Mountain. 

Prior to joining Columbia, O’Brien 
majored in music theory and _ corn- 
position at American University in 
his home town of Washington, D. C. 

" In making the announcement, Jack 
Wiedenmann, famous exec V.P. indi- 
cated that the Paramount and Dot 
labels will be greatly expanding their 
interests in rock and pop music and 
expects the West Coast to be a fertile 
ground for the discovery of creative 
talent. Wiedenmann explained that 
O’Brien will be looking for indie pro- 
ducers, new talent, and available 
masters in all areas of contemporary 
music. 


Cooper at Ne'w Location 

HOLLYWOOD — Paul Cooper Enter- 
rises has recently moved into new 
eadquarters located at 8660 Wilshire 
Blvd., Beverly Hills, Calif. Phone: 
213 657-4040. 


and hear suggestions as to what might 
be required to stop the counterfeiting. 

Die System 

Downey suggested that a die might 
be sold m the form of a tax by the 
government as a sort of permit giving 
each legitimate record manufacturer 
a number and seal which could be 
pressed into each piece of vinyl near 
the label on the inner groove. This 
would create a situation whereby boot- 
leggers pressing records would be vio- 
lating a law by counterfeiting a gov- 
ernment seal and evading a govern- 
ment tax. He felt a 10 year jail sen- 
tence would not be difficult to have 
lieved that such a penalty would great- 
ly deter bootlegging. 

Downey was also shown a bootlegged 
cartridge which features selections on 
one cartridge by such artists as Tom 
Jones, the Beatles, Creedence Clear- 
water, Led Zeppelin and eight other 
names, all under exclusive contracts 
to different companies. He was awed 
by an ad which had run in a Hawaiian , 
newspaper advertising such a cartridge | 
featuring an array of a dozen top 20 j 
hits by varied artists, the cartridge j 
being advertised for the price of $2.79. 

It was unanimously agreed by all at { 
the meeting that a Federal bootlegging 
law “with teeth” was necessary and 
that all would cooperate in the formu- 
lation of a committee of aggrieved 
parties who might assist in the devel- 
opment of such legislation. A1 Bell of 
Stax Records was appointed as the com- 
mittee head and was assigned the task 
of building a strong committee of in- 
dustry people who could relate to 
Washington, possibly through Senator 
Kennedy, the facts about the problem 
and some solutions to it. 

In addition to A1 Bell and Florence 
Greenberg, as well as members of the 
three music trade publications, others 
in attendance included Dave Rothfield 
of Korvette, (who said he could not 
compete with other retailers buying 
bootlegged merchandise), A1 Berman 
of the Harry Fox Office which repre- 
sents music publishers, Attorney An- 
drew Feinman, attorney Robert C. 
Osterberg of Abeles & Clark, and Jerry 
Geller, who runs Scepter’s tape oper- 
ation. 


Solomon To WB 

BURBANK — Warner Bros. Records 
has named Alan Solomon as assistant 
controller, reporting to controller 
Murray Gitlin. Solomon previously 
worked for United Recording Corp. 
and Capitol Records. 


Creed Taylor Label 

(Con't. from Page 9) 

CTFs album line will be available, 
under two series: 1000 for general 
pop product at $4.98 list and 6000 for 
jazz packaging (including double- 
fold sleeves at $5.98.) 

Another phase of the new operation 
is music publishing, with three firms 
underway. They are March Hare 
(ASCAP), Three Brothers (ASCAP) 
and Char-Liz (BMI) . 

CTI is located at 36 East 52nd St. 
in New York. Telephone is: (212) 
421-8611. 

Distrib Net 

The label’s present distrib network 
includes: Southland, Atlantic; Music 
Suppliers, Boston; F&F Arnold, Char- 
lotte; Summit, Chicago/Skokie; Main- 
line, Cleveland; M.B. Krupp, El Paso; 
Big State, Dallas; Pan American, 
Denver; Music Merchants, Detroit; 
H.'W. Daily, Houston; Pep, Los An- 
geles; Record Sales, Memphis; Cam- 
pus, Miami, Fla.; Heilicher, Minne- 
apolis; Alpha, New York; Universal, 
Philadelphia; Arc, Phoenix; Ark, 
Pittsburgh: Roberts, St. Louis; Eric- 
Mainland, San Francisco; Huffine, 
Seattle; Schwartz Bros., Washington, 
D.C. 


38 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


Tony Joe White 

"the Swamp Genius"... writer, producer, artist... 
does his own thing with gutsy realism from the Bayou country." 

“High SherifTVGroupg GirP 

^ ^ MN-45-1193 

Published By Combine Music, Inc. 


monument record corp. 

nashville / hollywood 


/i. 

monument 


is artistry 

V y 


TONY JOE WHITE IS ANOTHER REASON WHY MONUMENT IS ARTISTRY 



Chess’ Lewis Month 
Turning Out Sales 

Chess Records’ Ramsey Lewis 
Month is half over and is showing 
strong sales with new Lewis product 
as well as a substantial increase in 
catalogue items that include over 
twenty-five albums which have sold 
over four-and-a-half million copies. 

“The all around success of the pro- 
gram is attributable to the top-flight 
quality of Ramsey’s new releases and 
the vast amount of advertising and 
point of purchase assistance we are 
providing to enhance his already 
strong image,” stated Arnie Orleans, 
Chess sales manager. Another factor 
is the incentive programs which have 
induced local salesmen and promotion 
men to give extra impetus to the full 
Ramsey catalogue. They have provid- 
ed 55 second radio spots (five seconds 
allowed for dealer tag) for all mar- 
kets, a special poster, a Ramsey 
Lewis Month mobile for in-store or 
window use and easels with appropri- 
ate headers. Also, there’s an extensive 
institutional ad campaign that’s de- 
signed to saturate both trade and con- 
sumer areas. 

In conjunction with this program, 
Lewis has been taping interviews with 
key radio stations in Chicago and has 
made himself available to talk with 
anyone in the country on the telephone 
who wants to join the Ramsey Lewis 
Month effort. He has appeared on 
Chicago’s famed Kup’s Show and is 
taping the auto show on WGN-T’V (also 
Chicago) which will feature his prod- 
uct. He is currently preparing a per- 
sonal letter to all the disc jockeys 
across the country about his two new 
albums. Lewis will also conduct inter- 
views with members of key news- 
papers and college press. 


Wed. Children Go Forward 

HOLLYWOOD — Wednesday’s Chil- 
dren, a seven-member rock group, has 
been signed by Forward Records’ A&R 
vice president Danny Kessler. Indie 
producer Richard Delvey has been 
named to produce the first sessions 
with the group. 


Little David Distribs 

NEW YORK — Little David Records 
has just acquired the services of three 
more distributors to handle its records 
and tapes. The distributors are: B & K 
Distributing Company in Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma: Stan’s Record Ser- 
vice in Shreveport, Louisiana: and 
Taylor Electric Company in Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin. 


Della Reese 
Promo Underway 

NEW YORK — Avco Embassy, in con- 
junction with Della Reese, has moved 
their promo into full swing following 
the initial response to her new album, 
“Black Is Beautiful” and her single 
from the LP, “Games People Play.” 

The single which runs 5: 12 in the al- 
bum has been edited to 3: 09 and every 
station has now been reserviced with 
the shortened version on one side and 
the original full length cut from the al- 
bum on the flip side. 

Della Reese has been involved in 
making several in-store promotional 
appearances for the LP. In Los Ange- 
les, she made pre-arranged appear- 
ances in Wallich’s Music City in Holly- 
wood and followed that with an ap- 
pearance at the White Front Store in 
Los Angeles. Last week, she flew to 
Detroit to make two separate in-store 
appearances in the Topps Store chain, 
first in Oak Park, Michigan and then 
in Pontiac. 

The in-store appearances were ar- 
ranged through NMC Corp. who sell 
and service the stores involved in the 
promotions. In every case the promo- 
tion was preceded by radio spots and 
print advertising as well as in-store 
and window display material. Full 
color streamers, large posters, jackets 
and a special, “Black Is Beautiful ” 
button were shipped in advance to all 
the stores involved. She spent some 
two hours during each of her appear- 
ances talking with crowds and sign- 
ing autographs. Based on the store 
managers reports and the NMC Corp. 
all of the store appearances met with 
great success from the standpoint of 
in-store traffic and heavy Della Reese 
album sales. In the White Front store 
alone some 2,000 people passed 
through the record department during 
her appearance there. Interestingly 
enough, both the Oak Park and Ponti- 
ac, Michigan store appearances last 
week were held on Sunday (15) and 
both reported heavy turn out of rec- 
ord buyers and Della Reese fans. 

On her own syndicated television 
program which reaches into some 35 
markets she has on a number of oc- 
casions displayed the album cover 
and performed numbers from the al- 
bum. Her guest shots on other televi- 
sion shows have been marked by 
strong promotional plugs for the al- 
bum. Last week she sang, “Games 
People Play” on a Merv Griffin stint 
and she has since taped a Johnny Car- 
son appearance and is scheduled for 
another Merv Griffin show. 



GREAT SPECKLED BIRD SWOOPS DOWN ON BOSTON — FM radio station 
WBCN will present The Great Speckled Bird, Ian And Sylvia’s new group, in a 
benefit concert for the New England Chapter of the Ecology Action Committee 
on Feb. 24 at Boston Symphony Hall. (L. to r.) A1 Perry (WBCN), John Sdoucas, 
Josh Wallman (New England Ecology Center) and Larry Harris (Ampez Rec- 
ords) meet to plan for the performance. EAC is a group that favors legislation 
to protect this country’s natural resources from further pollution by man. The 
caricature pictured represents the Great Speckled Bird, who record for Ampex 
and who will donate its share of the proceeds to EAC. 



CoshBoK 



Top 50 in 
RScB Locations 


1 

RAINY NIGHT IN GEORGIA 


26 

LOVE BONES 



Brook Benton (Cotillion 44057) 

2 


Johnnie Taylor (Stax 0055) 

15 

2 

THANK YOU 


27 

THE TOUCH OF YOU 



Sly & The Family Stone (Epic 10555) 

1 


Brenda & The Tabulations 
(Top & Bottom 401) 

16 

3 

CALL ME 

Aretha Franklin (Atlantic 2706) 

7 

28 

IFYOU’VEGOT A HEART 

Bobby Bland (Duke 458) 

33 

4 

DO THE FUNKY CHICKEN 

Rufus Thomas (Stax 0059) 

3 

29 

BREAKING UP IS 

HARD TO DO 






Lenny Welch (Commonwealth United 3304) 29 

5 

NEVER HAD A DREAM 

COME TRUE 

Stevie Wonder (Tamla 54191) 

8 

30 

YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE 

20 


Dyke & The Blazers (Original Sound 90) 

6 

THE BELLS 

The Originals (Soul 35069) 

11 

31 

TIGHTEN UP 

Etta James (Cadet 5664) 

32 

7 

PSYCHEDELIC SHACK 

The Temptations (Gordy 7096) 

4 

32 

GOTTA FIND A BRAND 

NEW LOVER 

The Sweet Inspirations (Atlantic 2686) 

24 


8 

DIDN’T 1 (BLOW YOUR MIND) 





The Delfonics (Philly Groove 161) 

5 

33 

BOLD SOUL SIFTER 

Ike & Tina Turner (Blue Thumb 104) 

25 

9 

GIVE ME JUST 

A LITTLE MORE 

Chairman Of The Board (Invictus 9074) 

9 

34 

COME TOGETHER 

34 


Ike & Tina Turner (Minit 32087) 

10 

GOOD GUYS ONLY WIN 

IN THE MOVIES 


35 

KEEP ON DOIN’ 



Mel & Tim (Bamboo 109) 

12 


The Isley Bros. (T-Neck 914) 

39 

11 

THE THRILL IS GONE 


36 

YOU’RE THE ONE Pt. 2 



B. B. King (Bluesway 61032) 

6 


Little Sister (Stone Flower 9000) 

45 

12 

I’M JUST A PRISONER 


37 

CRYIN IN THE STREETS 



Candi Staton (Fame 1460) 

10 


George Perkins (Silver Fox 18) 

41 

13 

IT’S A NEW DAY 


38 

MORE TODAY THAN 


James Brown (King 6292) 

26 


YESTERDAY 

125th St. Candy Store (Uptite 0020) 

38 


14 

OH WHAT A DAY 

The Dells (Cadet 5663) 

14 

39 

HOLD ON 

Soul Children (Stax 0062) 


15 

CATWALK 

The Village Soul Choir 


40 

CONCRETE RESERVATION 



(Abbott 21)10) 

17 


Syl Johnson (Twinight 129) 

48 

16 

HEY THERE LONELY GIRL 


41 

DEEPER (IN LOVE 



Eddie Holman (ABC 11240) 

13 


WITH YOU) 

The O'Jays (Neptune 22) 

49 

17 

TO THE OTHER WOMAN 

Doris Duke (Canyon 28) 

28 

42 

LOVELY WAY SHE LOVES 

The Moments (Stang 5009) 

40 

18 

COUNTRY PREACHER 






Cannon Ball Adderley (Capitol 2698) 

19 

43 

YOU’RE RIGHT RAY CHARLES 





Joe Tex (Dial 4096) 

44 

19 

1 WANT YOU BACK 

Jackson 5 (Motown 1157) 

18 

44 

CALIFORNIA GIRL 

Eddie Floyd (Stax 0060) 

50 

20 

GOTTA HOLD ON TO 

THIS FEELING 


45 

YOU’VE MADE ME 



Jr. Walker & The All Stars (Soul 35070) 

30 


SO VERY HAPPY 

Lou Rawls (Capitol 2734) 

_ 

21 

TAKE IT OFF HIM & 

PUT IT ON ME 


46 

LAUGHIN’ AND CLOWNIN’ 



Clarence Carter (Atlantic 27021) 

27 


Ray Charles (ABC 1259) 

— 

22 

MESSAGE TO A BLACK MAN 


47 

YOU SAY IT 



The Whatnauts (A&L 001) 

21 


Al Greene (Hi 2872) 

47 

23 

MOON WALK Pt. 1 


48 

UP THE LADDER 



Joe Simon (Sound Stage Seven 2651) 

23 


TO THE ROOF 

Supremes (Motown 1162) 

— 

24 

HOW CAN 1 FORGET YOU 

Marvin Gaye (Tamla 54190) 

22 

49 

IF 1 LOSE YOUR LOVE 

Detroit Emeralds (Westbound 156) 

43 

25 

ALWAYS SOMETHING 
THERETO REMIND ME 


50 

SLIP AROUND 



R. B. Greaves (Atco 6726) 

31 


Charlie Hodges (Calla 168) 

42 


40 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 








Taieni On Single 


SLY AND THE FAMILY STONE 
GRAND FUNK RR— FLEETWOOD MAC— 
RICHARD PRYOR 


MADISON SQUARE GARDEN — Syl- 
vester Stewart you old devil you. You 
never let on that you had so much 
power. Sure, a lot of people who had 
seen you guys in concert said that you 
were great, but who ever expected 
what was going to happen at the Gar- 
den last weekend. And in front of 
21,000 people no less. 

Sly and the Family Stone groovin' 
right in front of your face like they 
were doing at the Garden is, at once, 
one of the most exciting and most 
frightening acts— make that phenom- 
enons — in show business. As soon as 
his entourage followed after a well 
timed lag by Sly, hit the stage, every 
one in the place was standing, either 
on his feet or on his chair, dancing, as 
Sly commanded, to the music. 

Looking at the crowd moving in uni- 
son, seeing thousands of outstretched 
arms simultaneously stabbing victory 
signs into the air gave me the feeling 
of what it must have been like in Ber- 
lin in ‘39 at those torchlit rallies at the 
Sportspalast. There were all these 
young people, liberated, intelligent, 
sophisticated youth responding en- 
masse, essentially to one man and his 
statement. Thankfully, the statement 
was a musical one. But it just seemed, 
at the time, that the crowd would have 
done anything Sly had requested of it. 
It was eerie. 

I'd like to think that Sly's songs 
which speak basically of unity, brother- 
hood, peace, self respect and individu- 
ality were the catalyst that brought 
the audience together. The Epic rec- 
ording group ranged through extended, 
charged versions of their hits and they 
were, in a word, “together." 

Capitol Records Grand Funk Rail- 
road preceded Sly with an energized 
set which would have been extremely 
difficult for almost any act to follow. 
It is really to Grand Funk's credit that 
they managed to get such great re- 
sponse from a crowd that had obvious- 


ly come to see Sly and the Family 
Stone. 

Grand Funk is probably one of the 
hardest working units in rock music. 
Lead guitarist, vocalist Mark Farner 
is now well into the derby of bare 
chested, overtly sexual rock perform- 
ers and, if the way he stalked, fell to 
his knees, and sensually sweated at 
the Garden is a normal example of his 
work, he is sure to finish in the money. 
Apart from the purely libidinal side of 
his act, Farner sings well and plays 
excellent guitar and harmonica abetted 
by the fine bass and drum work of Mel 
Schacher and Don Brewer, respective- 
ly. After seeing them laying down their 
extremely heavy sound in concert, it’s 
easy to see why Grand Funk has been 
selling so many records for Capitol. 

Richard Pryor is one of the hippest, 
incisive comics working today. How- 
ever, if there is anyone who can ex- 
plain what a comedian was doing play- 
ing to a packed Garden rock audience, 
I would like to hear it. The Garden is 
not a good “room " for a comedian. 
Pryor was obviously annoyed at the 
vociferous Garden audience and had 
the right to be. However, even in his 
limited turn, Pryor exhibited a beauti- 
ful understanding of the pathos/humor 
or everyday life. 

Fleetwood Mac was called on to open 
the four act show at 8; 30, a most un- 
enviable task. It would not be fair to 
review a group which had to perform 
while people were moving into the 
arena, getting settled for the evening 
and unable to get involved in the group. 
It's about time Fleetwood Mac’s man- 
agers got them a headline gig some- 
where, even in a small room, so that 
an audience could get the opportunity 
to concentrate on what they’re doing 
instead of halfhearing the group as 
you file, a few minutes late, into the 
Garden. 


n. s. 


EARL GRANT 


WESTSIDE ROOM, CENTURY CITY 
— West coasters who have been taking 
Grant for granted since his introduc- 
tion to the national charts more than 
a decade back should rush to sample 
his wares at the Century Plaza. He’ll 
be performing through March 8th, the 
longest engagement for any act since 
the room opened five years ago. It's 
the Decca artist’s second Century ap- 
pearance in 13 months and, if anything, 
he’s sharper than ever. 

Borrowing several chapters from 
Sammy Davis’ versatility shtick. Grant 
sings, dances, plays piano with one 
hand and electric organ with the other 
(his feet literally horn-piping across 
the bass pedals) and dances. He also 
whistles convincingly and does a cho- 
rus of “Save the Last Dance For Me” 
in Japanese. We hear he can, in addi- 
tion, play trumpet and drums. And, we 
wouldn't be a bit surprised to find him 
an expert at the rope dance trick. But, 
the point is that Grant does all these 


things well. He’s not just a pro. But a 
showman of the first rank. 

Highlights are almost too numerous 
to mention. But we do recall being 
particularly taken with his medley of 
Ellington comps (“Caravan," “Soli- 
tude,” “Satin Doll"), “Theme from 
Romeo and Juliet,” “I Can’t Stop Lov- 
ing You," “Ebb Tide” and a four min- 
ute musical dissertation of “soul. ” 

Personal sidemen include brother 
Bill (Grant) on drums, Henry Swan on 
guitar, and Dave Dryson on bass. A1 
Pellegrini’s band backs admirably, 
though some of the members had to 
comb hurriedly for charts as Grant, 
apparently, “winged" the show on. 
Opening night. Grant performed for 
an hour and fifty minutes. A couple of 
eves later (when we caught him) the 
act had been cut to a little more than 
60 minutes. A shame. He never did get 
around to “The End." And he is. 

h. g. 


NEIGHBORS: AN EAST RIVER ANTHOLOGY 


BITTER END. N.Y. — All of us are 
neighbors because we are all bound 
to rest in the common grave. Man’s 
tragic flaw has been a popular state- 
ment in literature throughout the ages 
and “Neighbors” by the group, A 
More Perfect Union, points it up again 
in their own way. 

A slide show of candid and posed 
photography is the backbone of the 
show and rock music serves to high- 
light some of the stills and give life to 
various faces projected on the screen. 
The photography is always very good 
and the fade-out and blur techniques 
provided by Ginny’s Light Box (visual 
part of the show) are tastefully pro- 
fessional. The music is always moving- 


be it heavy rock, pensive, lilting stuff 
or otherwise. All original material, the 
four very talented musicians (organ- 
piano, bass-recorder-trombone, guitar, 
drums) who lay it down know what 
they are doing and, more importantly, 
know what the other members are up 
to. The lyrics range from some clever 
and serious poetry to moments of trite- 
ness. That is probably inevitable when 
the group decides to hit on the same 
subject for an hour and a half. The 
vocals by the two lead singers are 
sometimes inaudible because of the 
simple weakness of their voices. 


f. h. 


BOBBY VINTON 


COPACABANA, N.Y. — Epic Records’ 
star pop singer Bobby "Vinton had a 
highly successful opening at the Copa- 
cabana last Monday (16), judging by 
the audience’s reaction to him. Slick 
and polished to a high professional 
gloss, Vinton executed his fast-paced 
set without a hitch. A ladies’ man, he 
circled the tables at ringside, kissing 
the female occupants, undid his tie on 
schedule, and sang of love, love, love. 
It was what the crowd wanted, and 
loud applause followed his every num- 
ber. 


To our mind, the high points of his 
performance were his rendition of his 
own song, “Mr. Lonely,” which has 
some human feeling, and “Mama 
Don’t Low,” during which he played 
trumpet, organ, saxophone and clar- 
inet with surprising skill. Among his 
other numbers were “Raindrops Keep 
Falling On My Head,” “If My Friends 
Could See Me Now,” “Those Were The 
Days,” and of course, his current hit, 
“My Elusive Dreams.” 

i.k. 


JAMES TAYLOR 


TROUBADOUR, L.A. — In the current 
vernacular, James Taylor has ‘gotten 
it together.’ When last we saw James, 
at the Bitter End quite some time ago, 
he was still living in the folk-tinged 
past, playing obscure songs, only oc- 
casionally moving on to his own com- 
positions, and generally acting more 
as a historian than an entertainer. 

Now, perhaps bouyed by his new 
contract with Warner Brothers, James 
is an entertainer, and a great talent 
as well. Opening with the best-known 
song from his first Apple album, “Car- 
olina On My Mind," he built impact as 
he went along, in true show business 
fashion, though never giving up his 
basic sincerity and authenticity. Other 
songs, drawn from his first album in- 
cluded “Something In The Way She 
Moves,” “Rainy Day Man,” “Circle 


Round The Sun” and “Knocking ‘Round 
The Zoo.” 

Towards the end of his show, Taylor 
was joined onstage by Carole King 
(she of Goffin-King fame) on piano for 
a couple of songs, then a rhythm sec- 
tion materialized for a few more num- 
bers, and finally, a horn section popped 
up out of the blue. Showing Taylor’s 
total range were some tunes from the 
new Warners album, including the lul- 
labye-like title song “Sweet Baby 
James,” “Blossom,” “Sunny Skies” 
and the hard-blues “Suite For 20G.” 

There are many new and talented 
writer/artists around, but James Tay- 
lor is the one with ‘public acclaim’ 
spelled out all over him. 


a. r. 


AMBERGRIS 


BITTER END, N.Y. — Somewhere 
they must keep a list of all the rock 
bands with brass sections. Already on 
that list are Blood, Sweat and Tears, 
Chicago, Cold Blood, Lighthouse and 
many, many more. Some names should 
be set on the list in ink, others in pen- 
cil (to be erased at will). Ambergris 
should be penned on the list in indelible 
ink. 

Under the guidance of ex-B,S&T horn 
man Jerry Weiss (playing bass guitar) , 
the group moves through a set of tight 
material with a four-man brass section 
putting the crispness of the sound right 
up front. Adept especially at hard 
rock, the group also handles Latin type 
material in natural form aided by 
some good conga work by the lead 
singer. Also, this is one of the few eight 
piece bands that attempt and succeed 
at bringing off some vocal harmony, 
although the lyrics are often preten- 
tious or trite. 

Ambergris suffers from poor stage 
presence between numbers, taking 
from four to five minutes of in-chatter 
among the group and some racing off- 
stage for bits of equipment left behind 


in the dressing room. With this they 
use the excitement they have built. 
One of their most interesting bits, 
though, is the way the brass answers 
phrases from the rhythm and lead sec- 
tions— especially the bass, probably be- 
cause of Weiss’ involvement on both 
instruments. Soon to be available on a 
Paramount LP entitled “Ambergris,” 
they are a bright, new addition to the 
ranks of today’s the big rock bands. 

Paul Siebel was also on the bill (re. 
CB review; Feb. 14) and has an inter- 
esting show. A big contribution to that 
interest, though, is David Bromberg, 
Siebel’s lead guitarist for the gig. 
Bromberg is a sideman of high fame, 
having played in clubs and studios with 
most of the biggest folk and country 
type artists of the late 60’s. Backing 
Siebel on electric and accoustical gui- 
tars, he handles the necessary riffs 
with the most fantastic ease and taste. 
But he shines on the dobro, a slide gui- 
tar of Russian and Polish descent. A 
refreshing and enjoyable show in him- 
self, Bromberg is a totally involving 
and involved musician. 

f.h. 


All-Out ‘Hair’ Push 
Scheduled By UA 

NEW YORK — United Artists will in- 
augurate an all-out promotion cam- 
paign on the new music from “Hair.” 
According to executive v.p. and gen- 
eral mgr, Murry Deutch, the company 
and its field men from coast to coast 
will be taking part in the campaign. 
His entire staff will work in conjunc- 
tion with RCA, who just released the 
album “DisinHAIRited— More HAIR 
Music,” which includes 13 songs orig- 
inally written for and featured in ear- 
lier versions of the hit musical. 

Deutch stated “Indications on the 
tremendous potential of these lesser- 
known songs is best illustrated by what 
has become the biggest hit in the Tor- 
onto version of the show, a song called 
‘So Sing the Children’ The song is such 
a hit there the producers are consider- 
ing including it in the New York pro- 
duction.” 

The songs are performed by two of 
the show’s writers, Gerome Ragni and 
James Rado, along with past and pres- 
members of the b^roadway cast. Galt 
MacDermot, the third writer of “Hair,” 
produced the album and is featured on 
piano. 



IN TOWN — Leslie Uggams opened 
recently at the Royal Box in N.Y. and 
on hand to greet her were Ahmet Erte- 
gun, Atlantic Records’ president, and 
his wife. 


42 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 




y»PLE 

1815 




siafe^- 



FROM THE 


BAoflNGER 

SOUNDTRACK i OF THE FILM THE 


MAGIC CHRISTIAN’ 



Nominees To Perform At NARAS Fetes 


NEW YORK — This year’s Grammy 
Awards ceremonies, in addition to the 
usual array of industry presenters, 
will highlight a host of outstanding 
performers, many of them nominees, 
according to reports from the Record 
Academy’s (NARAS) various chap- 
ters. 

Already set to perform at the 
Los Angeles dinner in the Century 
Plaza are Bill Medley singing Song 
of the Year nomination “Games Peo- 
ple Play,” Henry Mancini, Record 
of the Year nominee, conducting the 
“Love Theme from Romeo and Jul- 
iet,” Best New Artist nominee Oliver 
singing “Jean,” Mac Davis singing 
his own nominated song, “In The 
Ghetto” and Sergio Mendez and Bra- 
zil ’66 playing a brace of numbers. 
All this in addition to the previously 
announced Bill Cosby as m.c. and Les 
Brown and his Band of Renown. 

New York, which will be staging 
a theatrical type presentation (the 

NARAS Holds Meet 
Of Press Group 

NEW YORK — A large turn out of 
label representatives met recently 
at the offices of the New York chap- 
ter of NARAS to discuss their assist- 
ance and participation in this year’s 
awards affair, set for March 11. Chair- 
man of the meet was George Simon, 
exec director of the New York chapt- 
er who reported “extraordinary en- 
thusiasm and cooperation from those 
able to attend.” Awards in New York 
will be held at Alice Tully Hall this 
year, preceded by cocktails and buffet 
supper served in the Julliard School 
of Music, which adjoins the hall. Pre- 
senters and entertainers will be an- 
nounced shortly. 

Those in attendance representing 
their respective record labels were: 
Bob Rolontz (Atlantic), Bob Jack- 
son (Buddah) , Stu Ginsberg (Capitol) , 
Bob Altschuler (Columbia), Sue C. 
Clark (Command/Probe), Ellis Nas- 
sour and Jim Slaughter (Decca), 
Sol Handwerger (MGM), Herb Hel- 
man (RCA), Marty Hoffman (United 
Artists), and Richard Gersh and Bar- 
ry Kittleson of Richard Gersh Assoc- 
iates, press for the New York chapter. 


first in the Academy’s history) in Lin- 
coln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, has 
lined up four performers, with more 
to come. Set at press-time were three 
Grammy nominees: Miles Davis 
with his new group, blue star B. B. 
King, folk singer John Denver, plus 
the Voices of East Harlem. Merv 
Griffin will m.c. and Dick Hyman 
will lead a thirty-piece orchestra of 
top New York musicians. Additional 
performers are being set. 

Nashville, which moves its cere- 
monies into spacious Municipal Audi- 
torium this year, will present enter- 
tainment by two nominees, B. J. 
Thomas and Lynn Anderson, plus 
Jack Balance, and the Imperials. 
Don Tweedy will direct the orches- 
tra. 

Chicago, still in the stages of lin- 
ing up its entertainers, for its show 
in the Ambassador West Hotel, has 
set Regis Philbin as m.c. with Kenny 
Soderblom rehired to handle the 
music. Atlanta, newest of the NARAS 
chapters, has set Ray Stevens and 
Steve Alimo as masters of ceremonies 
and Larry Goss as musical director 
for its Grammy Awards ceremonies 
to be held in the American Motor 
Hotel. 

Names of presenters at the five 
ceremonies, to be held on Wednes- 
day, March 11th, will be announced 
next week. 


Aretha In Studios; 

Plans Spring Tour 

NEW YORK — Aretha Franklin, cur- 
rently shooting up the charts with 
her new Atlantic album, “This 
Girl’s In Love With You,” and self 
penned single, “Call Me,” is back 
in the studio recording some new 
material. She is also planning to 
undertake her first concert tour in 
several months. 

Aretha will spend the next week at 
the Criteria Studios in Florida cutting 
a series of new tracks under the dir- 
ection of Atlantic Executive Vice 
President Jerry Wexler. 

Once her sessions are completed, 
Aretha will then schedule a series 
of personal appearances to kick off 
in the Spring. 



MENTION DIMENSION and the word “fifth” usually pops into your head. And 
that Bell recording group popped by a party following their recent concert at 
Philharmonic Hall in N. Y. The 5th Dimension’s (previously with Soul City) first 
Bell single, “The Declaration,” is moving well and a follow-up is soon to be re- 
leased. In the top photo are (1. to r.) Billy Davis Jr. and Marilyn McCoo of the 
5th Dimension, Larry Uttal, president of Bell Records, Florence LaRue, Ron 
Townson and Lamont McLemore of the gsoup and Mrs. Pamela Uttal. In the 
lower photo, the Uttals admire the specially-commissioned painting (in back- 
ground) of the 5th Dimension by artist Leroy Neiman (right). The painting will 
be used as the LP cover for the 5th Dimension’s first Bell album. 


TOP HITS OF THE YEAR 


A COMPILATION OF THE YEAR’S BIGGEST HITS TO DATE 


Because Cash Box is continually asked to supply a list of the year's leading hits to A&R men, record producers 
and radio stations, etc.. Cash Box offers a continuing feature that lists the year’s Top SO titles as of the date the 
feature appears. The feature is published in the last issue of each month and is compiled from the Cash Box Top 
100 Sales Chart. Point system operates as follows: For each week a song is #1 on the Top 100 it receives 135 
points. Each #2 record is awarded 124 points. No. 3 gets 123. No. 4 gets 122. No. 5 gets 121. From No. 6 thru 
No. 10 songs get 115 to 111 points respectively. No. 11 song gets 90 points and so on down the line till the No. 50 
song which gets 51 points. Only the top fifty titles of any given week are included in the survey. Survey begins 
with the first issue in January. 




Position 

Total 



Last Month Points 

1. 

Venus— Shocking Blue— Colossus 

3 

1001 

2. 

Raindrops Keep Failin’ On My Head— 

B.J. Thomas— Scepter 

1 

997 

3. 

1 Want You Back— Jackson 5— Motown 

2 

949 

4. 

Someday We’ll Be Together— Supremes— Motown 

4 

890 

5. 

Whole Lotta Love— Led Zeppelin— Atlantic 

5 

888 

6. 

Without Love— Tom Jones— Parrot 

10 

820 

7. 

Don’t Cry Daddy— Elvis Presley- RCA 

7 

810 

8. 

I’ll Never Fall In Love— Dionne Warwick— Scepter 

11 

805 

9. 

Jingle Jangle— Archies— Kirshner' 

9 

762 

10. 

No Time— Guess Who— RCA 

23 

715 

11. 

Early In The Morning— Vanity Fare— Page One 

13 

685 

12. 

Arizona— Mark Lindsey— Columbia 

22 

685 

13. 

Thank You— Sly & The Family Stone— Epic 

35 

656 

14. 

Walkin’ In The Rain— Jay & The Americans— U.A. 

16 

653 

15. 

Winterworld Of Love— Englebert Humperdinck— Parrot 

14 

646 

16. 

Hey There Lonely Girl— Eddie Holman— ABC 

32 

621 

17. 

Leaving On A Jet Plane— Peter, Paul & Mary— WB 7 

8 

599 

18. 

Monster— Steppenwolf—Dunhill 

24 

592 

19. 

Jam Up Jelly Tight— Tommy Roe— ABC 

8 

587 

20. 

Walk A Mile In My Shoes— Joe South— Capitol 

33 

548 

21. 

Baby Take Me In Your Arms— Jefferson— Janus 

20 

539 

22. 

Wonderful World, Beautiful People— Jimmy Cliff— A&M 

18 

521 

23. 

Blowing Away— Fifth Dimension— Soul City 

21 

520 

24. 

Fancy— Bobby Gentry— Capitol 

31 

505 

25. 

Midnight Cowboy— Ferrante & Teicher— U.A. 

12 

500 

26. 

Psychedelic Shack— The Temptations— Gordy 

43 

485 

27. 

Honey Come Back— Glen Campbell— Capitol 

44 

455 

28. 

Rainy Night In Georgia— Brook Benton— Cotillion 

— 

426 

29. 

La La (If 1 Had You)— Bobby Sherman— Metromedia 

15 

417 

30. 

Holly Holy— Neil Diamond— Uni 

17 

396 

31. 

Let’s Work Together— Wilbert Harrison— Sue 

46 

391 

32. 

She— Tommy James & The Shondells— Roulette 

19 

380 

33. 

Travelin’ Band— Creedence Clearwater Revival- 
Fantasy 



376 

34. 

The Thrill Is Gone— B.B. King— Bluesway 

— 

368 

35. 

Jennifer Tomkins— Street People— Musicor 

48 

359 

36. 

Down On The Corner— Creedence Clearwater 

Revival— Fantasy 

25 

349 

37. 

How Can 1 Forget You— Marvin Gaye— Tamla 

45 

340 

38. 

When Julie Comes Around— Cuff Links— Decca 

26 

335 

39. 

Hold On— The Rascals- Atlantic 

37 

334 

40. 

Na, Na Hey Hey— Steam— Fontana 

27 

327 

41. 

Evil Woman— Crow— Amaret 

28 

326 

42. 

She Belongs To Me— Rick Nelson— Decca 

29 

317 

43. 

Cupid— Johnny Nash— Jad 

30 

316 

44. 

She Came In Through The Bathroom Window- 
Joe Cocker— A&M 

38 

305 

45. 

Who’ll Stop The Rain— Creedence Clearwater Revival- 
Fantasy 



289 

46. 

Everybody Is A Star— Sly & The Family Stone— Epic 

49 

284 

47. 

Eli’s Coming— Three Dog Night— Dunhill 

34 

277 

48. 

Up On Cripple Creek— The Band— Capitol 

36 

273 

49. 

Always Something There To Remind Me— 

R.B. Greaves— Atco 



270 

50. 

If 1 Were A Carpenter— Johnny Cash & June Carter— 
Columbia 



265 


44 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 





M 




personal 

managers; 



(West Coast) 



SEYMOUR HELLER & ASSOCIATES 
9220 SUNSET BOULEVARD • LOS ANGELES 90069 


LLOYD GREENFIELD & ASSOCIATES 
9 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA • NEW YORK CITY 10020 









2 


3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 



18 

19 

20 

21 


22 

23 

24 



26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 


BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER 

SIMON & GARFUNKEL (Columbia KCS 9914) 
(18 10 0750) (14 10 0750) (16 10 0750) 

LED ZEPPELIN II 

(Atlantic SD 8236) 
(8236) 

ABBEY ROAD 

BEATLES (Apple SO 383) 
(8XT 383) (4XT 383) 

WILLY AND THE POORBOYS 

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL (Fantasy 8397) 

TOIVI JONES LIVE IN 
LAS VEGAS 

(Parrot PAS 71031) 
(M 7983) (X 79431) (X 70631) 

ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK 

(Parrot PAS 71030) 
(M 79830) (X 79430) (X 79630) 

SANTANA 

(Columbia CS 9781) 
(18 10 0692) (16 10 0692) 

LET IT BLEED 

ROLLING STONES (London iMPS 4) 
(M 72167) (X 17167) (X 57167) 

JOE COCKER 

(A&M SP4224) 

CAPTURED LIVE AT THE FORUM 

THREE DOG NIGHT (Dunhili DS 50068) 
(850068) (450068) (550068) 

EASY RIDER 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Dunhili DSK 50063) 
(8RM 2026) (CRM 2026) 

RAINDROPS KEEP FAILIN’ 

ON MY HEAD 

B. J. THOMAS (Scepter SPS 580) 

GRAND FUNK 

GRAND FUNK RAILROAD (Capitol SKAO 406) 
(8XT 406) (4XT 406) 

TRY A LITTLE KINDNESS 

GLEN CAMPBELL (Capitol SW 389) 
(8XT 389)(4XT389) 

CHICAGO 

(Columbia KGP 24) 
(18 BO 0858) (16 BO 0858) 

BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS 

(Columbia CS 9720) 
(COL 18 10 0552) (COL 14 10 0552) (16 10 0552) 

HELLO, I’M JOHNNY CASH 

(Columbia KCS 9943) 
(18 10 0826) (14 10 0826) (16 10 0826) 

DIANA ROSS PRESENTS THE 
JACKSON 5 

(Motown MS 700) 

THE BAND 

(Capitol STAG 132) 
(8XT 132) (4XT 132) 

MUSIC FROM “BUTCH CASSIDY 
AND THE SUNDANCE KID” 

BURT BACHARACH (A&M SP 4227) 
(8T 4227) (4T 4227) (CT 4227) 

TO OUR CHILDREN’S 
CHILDREN’S CHILDREN 

MOODY BLUES (Threshold THS 1) 
(M 24801) (M 24601) 

LIVE PEACE IN TORONTO 1969 

PLASTIC ONO BAND (Apple 3362) 
(8XT 3362) (4XT 3362) 

HAIR 

ORIGINAL CAST (RCA Victor LSO 1150) 
(083- 1038) 

CROSBY, STILLS & NASH 

(Atlantic SE 8229) 
(8229) (X4 8229) 

AMERICAN WOMAN 

THE GUESS WHO (RCA LPS 4266) 
(P8S 1518) 

TOMMY ROE'S GREATEST HITS 

(ABC ABCS 700) 

ALBUM 1700 

PETER, PAUL & MARY 

(Warner Bros./7 Arts WS 1700) 

IN-A-GADDA-DA-VIDA 

IRON BUTTERFLY (Atco 2051) 
(2501) (X 52501) 

I AM THE PRESIDENT 

DAVID FRYE (Elektra EKS 75006) 

SHADY GROVE 

QUICKSILVER MESSENGER SERVICE (Capitol SKAO 391) 
(8XT 391) (4XT 391) 

VOLUNTEERS 

JEFFERSON AIRPLANE (RCA LSP 4238) 
(P8S 1507) 

SEE 

RASCALS (Atlantic SD 8246) 

THE AGE OF AQUARIUS 

5TH DIMENSION (Soul City SCS 92005) 
(3951) (4951) (C-951) 


9 


1 


2 


3 


4 


7 


6 

10 

5 

17 

12 

15 

13 

26 

11 

29 

20 

14 

19 

16 

18 

23 

21 

35 

22 

24 

27 

25 
34 

28 

31 

40 


34 

35 

36 

37 



43 


44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 



52 

53 

54 

55 

56 


57 

58 

59 



61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 
67 


THE BEST OF CHARLEY PRIDE 

(RCA LSP 4223) 
(P8S 1505) 

THE BEST OF TOMMY JAMES 
&THESHONDELLS 

(Roulette SR 42040) 

JOHNNY CASH AT SAN QUENTIN 

(Columbia CS 09827) 
(18 10 0674) (14 10 0674) (16 10 0674) 

MONSTER 

STEPPENWOLF (Dunhili DS 50068) 
(850066) (450066) (550066) 

BARBRA STREISANDS’ GREATEST HITS 

(Columbia KCS 9968) 
(18 10 0852) (16 10 0852) 

PUZZLE PEOPLE 

TEMPTATIONS (Gordy 949) 

FRIJID PINK 

(Parrot PAS 71033) 
(79833) (79633) 

COMPLETELY WELL 

B. B. KING (Bluesway BLS 6037) 

THIS GIRL’S IN LOVE WITH YOU 

ARETHA FRANKLIN (Atlantic SD 8248) 
(TP 8248) (CS 8248) 

IN THE COURT OF THE CRIMSON 
KING 

(Atlantic SD 8245) 
(TP 8245) 

ALICE’S RESTAURANT 

ARLO GUTHRIE (Reprise RS 6267) 
(8RM 6267) (CRX 6267) 

BOBBY SHERMAN 

(Metromedia MD 1014) 

TOUCHING YOU . . . TOUCHING ME 

NEIL DIAMOND (Uni 73071) 

BEST OF TRAFFIC 

(United Artists UAS 5500) 

STAND! 

SLY & THE FAMILY STONE (Epic BN 26456) 
(N 18-10186) (N14-10186) (N16-10186) 

SUITABLE FOR FRAMING 

THREE DOG NIGHT (Dunhili DS 50058) 

COLD BLOOD 

(San Francisco 200) 

THE SHOCKING BLUE 

(Colossus CS 1000) 
(M 81000) M5 1000) 

OLIVER 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Colgems COSD 5501) 
(08CB-1003) 

R. B. GREAVES 

(AtcoSD 311) 

GREEN RIVER 

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL (Fantasy 8393) 
(88393) (48393) (58393) 

MIDNIGHT COWBOY 

FERRANTE & TEICHER (United Artists UAS 6725) 

DON’T IT MAKE YOU WANT 
TOGO HOME 

JOE SOUTH (Capitol ST 392) 
(8XT 392) (4XT 392) 

HOT BUTTERED SOUL 

ISAAC HAYES (Enterprise ENS 1001) 

MIDNIGHT COWBOY 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (United Artists UA 5198) 

PAINT YOUR WAGON 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Paramount PMS 1001) 
(89004) (29504) 

ANDY WILLIAMS’ GREATEST HITS 

(Columbia KCS 9979) 
(18 10 0870) (16 10 0870) 

ROMEO & JULIET 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Capital ST 2993) 
(8XT2993) (Y 18 2993) 

SWISS MOVEMENT 

EDDIE HARRIS 8. LES MC CAN 

(Atlantic SD-1537) 

DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES 
GREATEST HITS (VOL 3) 

(Motown MS 702) 

HELLO DOLLY 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (20th Century Fox DTCS 5103) 

LEAVING IT ALL BEHIND 

GRASS ROOTS (Dunhili DS 50067) 

GOLDEN GREATS VOL. 1 

DENNIS YOST & THE CLASSICS (Imperial LP 16000) 

LED ZEPPELIN 

(Atlantic SD 8216) 
(8216) (X 58216) 


33 

36 

32 

30 

68 

42 

51 

46 

58 

37 

43 

38 

44 

47 

54 

57 

60 

64 

56 

50 

39 

63 

41 

66 

45 

52 

74 

65 

69 

62 

48 

55 

59 

49 


68 

69 

70 


71 

72 

73 



77 

78 

79 

80 



89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 


ZEPHYR 


(Probe CPLP 4510) 70 

TRACES/MEMORIES 


LETTERMEN (Capitol ST 390) 
(8XT 390) (4XT 390) 

GET READY 

RARE EARTH (Rare Earth RS 507) 

FROM VEGAS TO MEMPHIS 

ELVIS PRESLEY (RCA LSP 6020) 


75 

77 

53 


CLOSING THE GAP 

MICHAEL PARKS (MGMSE 4646) 72 

A BRAND NEW ME 

DUSTY SPRINGFIELD (Atlantic SD 8249) 79 
(TP 8249) (CS 8249) 

BROOK BENTON TODAY 

(Cotillion SD 9018) — 
(TP 9018) (CS 9018) 


STEAM 

MORRISON HOTEL 


(Mercury SR 61254) 78 
(MC8 61254) (CR4 61254) 


DOORS (Elektra EKS 75007) — 
(M8 5007) 


KOZMIC BLUES 

JANIS JOPLIN (Columbia KCS 9913) 61 
(18 10 0748) (14 10 0748) (16 10 0748) 

THE DEVIL MADE ME 
BUY THIS DRESS 

FLIP WILSON (Little David LD 1000) 88 

WAX MUSEUM 

JAY & THE AMERICANS (United Artists UAS 6719) 81 

BEST OF BEE GEES 

(Atco SD-292) 82 
(292) (X5 292) 


RICK NELSON IN CONCERT 

(Decca DL 75162) — 

LIVE DEAD 

GRATEFUL DEAD (Warner Bros./7 Arts WS 1830) 84 
(8WM 1830) (CWM 1830) 

ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (United Artists UAS 5204) 88 

KOOPER SESSION 

AL KOOPER & SHUGGIE OTIS (Columbia 9951) 85 

STONEHENGE 

RICHIE HAVENS (Stormy Forest SFS 6001) 96 

I LOVE YOU 

EDDIE HOLMAN (ABC ABCS 701) - 

UMMAGUMMA 

PINK FLOYD (Harvest STBB 388) 86 
(8XT 388) (4XT 388) 

FUNNY GIRL 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Columbia BOX 3220) 136 
(COL 18 12 0034) (COL 14 12 0034) (16 12 0034) 

AIN’T IT FUNKY NOW 

JAMES BROWN (King KS 1092) 93 

MAKE YOUR OWN KIND OF MUSIC 

MAMA CASS (Dunhili DS 50071) 92 

2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (MGM STE-13) 87 

BAYOU COUNTRY 

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL (Fantasy 8387) 89 
(88387) (48387) (58387) 


LEAVING ON A JET PLANE 

PERCY FAITH (Columbia CS 9983) 95 
(18 10 0880) (16 10 0880) 


BEST OF CREAM 
NILSSON SINGS NEWMAN 

BLIND FAITH 


(AtcoSD-291) 91 
(291) (X5 291) 


(RCA LSP 4289) — 
(P8S 1539) 


(AtcoSD 304) 97 
(304) 


THE TURNING POINT 

JOHN MAYALL (Polydor 24 4004) 99 
(953002) (PD 9 14652) 


DisinHAIRited 

VARIOUS ARTISTS (RCA LSO 1163) 100 
(OSS 1043) 


Z 

ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (Columbia 053370) - 
(18 12 0046) 

CANNED HEAT COOK BOOK 
(THE BEST OF CANNED HEAT) 

(Liberty LST 11000) 98 




Basic Album inventory 

A check list of best selling pop albums other than those appearing on the CASH BOX Top TOO Album chart. Feature is designed to call wholesalers & retailers 
attention to key catalog, top steady selling IP's, as well as recent chart hits still going strong in sales. Information is supplied by manufacturers. This is a weekly 
revolving list presented in alphabetical order. It is advised that this card be kept until the list returns to this alphabetical section. 


CADET “4000” SERIES CHECKER 


Etta James 

At Last 

4003 

Bo Diddley 

Have Guitar, Will T ravel 

2974 

2974 

Etta James 

The Second Time Around 

4011 

Bo Diddley 

Bo Diddley is a Gunslinger 

2977 

2977 

Etta James 

Etta 

4013 

Bo Diddley 

Bo Diddley is a Lover 

2980 

2980 

Etta James 

Top Ten 

4025 

Bo Diddley 

Road Runner 

2982 

2982 

Etta James 

Rocks The House 

4032 

Bo Diddley 

Bo Diddley & Company 

2985 

2985 

Bob Hope 

On The Road To Vietnam 

4046 

Bo Diddley 

16 All Time Greatest Hits 

2989 

2989 

Etta James 

Call My Name 

4055 

Bo Diddley & 




Johnny Watson 

1 Cried For You 

4056 

Chuck Berry 

Two Great Guitars 

2991 

2991 



Little Milton 

We're Gonna Make It 

2995 

2995 




Fontella Bass 

The New Look 

2997 

2997 




Bobby Moore 

Searching for My Love 

3000 

3000 




Bo Diddley 

The Criginator 

3001 

3001 


CADET/COIMCEPT SERIES 


Little Milton 

Sings Big Blues 

3002 

3002 



Bo Diddley 

Go Bo Diddley 

3006 

3006 




Bo Diddley 

Bo Diddley, Muddy 

Boss Man 

3007 

3007 



312 

Waters & Little Walter 

Super Blues 

3008 

3008 

Rotary Connection 





Electric Mud 

Muddy Waters 

314 





Aladdin 

Rotary Connection 

317 





The Howlin’ 

Wolf Album 


319 


CHESS 







Chuck Berry 

After School Session 

1426 

1426S 


CAPITOL 


Chuck Berry 

One Dozen Berries 

1432 

1432S 




Chuck Berry 

Rockin' At The Hops 

1448 

1448S 




Chuck Berry 

Greatest Hits 

1485 

1485S 




Chuck Berry 

Fresh Berry’s 

1498 

1498S 

The Band 

Music From Big Pink 

ST 2955 

Chuck Berry 

Golden Decade 

1514D 

1514D-S 

The Band 

The Band 

STAC 132 

Moms Mabley 

Funniest Woman In The World 

1447 

1447S 

Beach Boys 

Close-Up 

SWBB 253 

Moms Mabley 

At The Geneva Conference 

1463 

1463S 

The Beatles 

The Beatles 

SWBO 101 

Moms Mabley 

Breaks It Up 

1472 

1472S 

The Beatles 

Abbey Road 

SO 383 

Moms Mabley 

1 Got Somethin’ To Tell You 

1479 

1479S 

Glen Campbell 

Try A Little Kindness 

SW 389 

Moms Mabley 

The Funny Sides Of Moms Mabley 

1482 

1482s 

Glen Campbell 

Glen Campbell “Live” 

STBO 268 

Moms Mabley 

The Best Of Moms And Pigmeat 

1487 

1487S 

Patti Drew 

Wild Is Love 

ST 408 

Pigmeat Markham 

The Trial 

1451 

1451S 

Grand Funk 



Pigmeat Markham 

World’s Greatest Clown 

1475 

1475S 

Railroad 

Grand Funk 

SKAO 406 

Pigmeat Markham 

Open The Door Richard 

1484 

1484S 

Merle Haggard 

Okie From Muskogee 

ST 384 

Pigmeat Markham 

Mr. Vaudeville 

1515 

1515S 

Wanda Jackson 

"In Person” Wanda Jackson 

ST 345 

Pigmeat Markham 

Save Your Soul, Baby 

1517 

1517S 

Sonny James 

Astrodome Presents Sonny James 

ST 320 

Muddy Waters 

The Best Of Muddy Waters 

1427 

1427S 

Peggy Lee 

Is That All There Is 

ST 386 

Muddy Waters 

Muddy Waters At Newport 

1449 

1449S 

Lettermen 

Traces/Memories 

ST 390 

Muddy Waters 

Folk Singer 

1483 

1483S 

Lettermen 

Hurt So Bad 

ST 269 

Muddy Waters 

The Real Folk Blues 

1501 

1501S 

Al Martino 

Jean 

ST 379 

Muddy Waters 

Brass & The Blues 

1507 

1507S 

Mireille Mathieu 

Magnifique! 

ST 417 

Muddy Waters 

More Real Folk Blues 

1511 

1511S 

Steve Miller Band 

Your Saving Grace 

SKAO 331 

Howlin’ Wolf 

Moanin’ In The Moonlight 

1434 

1434S 

Modern Jazz 



Howlin’ Wolf 

Howlin’ Wolf 

1469 

1469S 

Quartet 

Space 

STAO 3360 

Howlin’ Wolf 

The Real Folk Blues 

1502 

1502S 

Plastic Ono Band 

Live Peace 

SW 3362 

Howlin’ Wolf 

More Real Folk Blues 

1512 

1512S 

Buck Owens 

Big In Vegas 

ST 413 

Billy Stewart 

Summertime 

1499 

1499S 

Lou Rawls 

Your Good Thing 

ST 325 

Billy Stewart 

Teaches Old Standards New Tricks 

1513 

1513S 

Linda Ronstadt 

Hand Grown-Hand Sown 

ST 208 

Sonny Boy Williamson 

Down & Out Blues 

1437 

1437S 

Sandler & Young 

Odds & Ends 

ST 335 

Sonny Boy Williamson 

The Real Folk Blues 

1503 

1503S 

Joe South 

Don’t It Make You Want To Go Home 

ST 392 

Sonny Boy Williamson 

More Real Folk Blues 

1509S 

1509S 

Nancy Wilson 

Hurt So Bad 

ST 353 

Pigmeat Markham 

Backstage 


1521 

Various Artists 

Romeo & Juliet (Movie Soundtrack) 

ST 2993 

Pigmeat Markham 

Here Comes The Judge 


1523 

Various Artists 

Salvation (Orig. Off-B’way Cast) 

SO 337 

Moms Mabley 

Breaks Up The Network 


1525 

Various Artists 

Super Oldies, Vol. 6 

STBB401 

Pigmeat Markham 

Tune Me In 


1526 

Various Artists 

Country Special 

STBB 402 

Buddy Guy 

Left My Blues In San Francisco 


1527 


TOP 100 Albums 



10 1 TO 140 


101 THE BRASS ARE COMIN’ 

Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass 
(A&M SP 4228) 

|8T 4228] (4T 4228) (CT 4228) 

102 JINGLE JANGLE 

Archies (Kirshner KES 105) 

(P8K 01004) 

103 YER ALBUM 

The James Gang (Bluesway BLS 6034) 

104 THE VELVET GENTLEMAN 
(THE MUSIC OF ERIK SATIE) 

Camarata Contemp. Chamber Group 
IDetam DES 18036) 

105 SUPER HITS 

Delfonics (Philly Groove 1152) 

106 LOVE THEME FROM ROMEO & JULIET 
Johnny Mathis (Columbia CS 9909) 

(18 10 0744)114 10 0744) (16 10 0744) 

107 DIONNE WARWICK S GOLDEN HITS (Part 2) 
(Scepter SPS 577) 

(577) (5577) 

108 NEVER GOIN' BACK TO GEORGIA 

Blues Magoos (ABC ABCS 697) 

109 THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND 

(Atco SD 308) 

110 WALKING IN SPACE 

Quincy Jones (A&M SP 3023) 

|8T 3023) (4T 3023) (CT 3023) 


111 BACK IN THE USA 

MC 5 (Atlantic SD 8247) 

(TP 8247) (CS 8247) 

112 YE-ME-LE 

Sergio Mendes & Brasil '66 (A&M SP 4236) 
(8T 4236) (4T 4236) (CT 4236) 

113 LORD SUTCH AND HEAVY FRIENDS 
(Cotillion SD 9015) 

(TP 9015) (CS 9015) 

114 ARTHUR 

Kinks (Reprise RS 6366) 

(8RM 6366) (CRX 6366) 

115 THIS IS TOM JONES 
(Parrot PAS 71028) 

(M 79828) (X 79428) (X 79628) 

116 THROUGH THE PAST DARKLY 
(BigHitsVol. 2) 

Rolling Stones (London NPS 3) 

(M 72162) (X 17162) (X 57162) 

117 ALIVE ALIVE-O 

Jose Feliciano (RCS LSP 6021) 

(P8S 1537/8) 

118 COCO 

Original Cast (Paramount PMS 1002) 

(PM 89008) (PM 29508) 

119 STAND UP 

Jethro Tull (Reprise RS 6360) 

(8RM 6360) (CRX 6360) 

120 DIARY OF A BAND 

John Mayall (London PS 570) 

|M 72169) (M 57169) 


121 THE VOGUES’ GREATEST HITS 

(Reprise RS 6371) 

(8RM 6371) (CRX 6371) 

122 THATSTHEWAYLOVEIS 

Marvin Gaye (Tamla TS 299) 

123 BALLAD OF EASY RIDER 

Byrds (Columbia CS 9942) 

(18 10 0810) (16 10 1810) 

124 SGT. PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND 

Beatles (Capitol SMAS 2653) 

(8XT 2653) (4XT 2653) 

125 ISTHAT ALL THERE IS 
Peggy Lee (Capitol ST 386) 

(8XT 386) (4XT 386) 

126 ON TIME 

Grand Funk Railroad (Capitol ST 307) 

(8XT 307) (4XT 307) 

127 CONSTRUCTION#! 

Ten Wheel Drive (Polydor 24-4008) 

128 THE BEATLES 
(Apple SWBO 101) 

Part I (86W160) (4WX 160) Part II (86W 161) 

129 GLEN CAMPBELL “LIVE " 

(Capitol STOB 268) 

130 TOMMY 

The Who (Decca CXSW 7205) 

(6-2550) (73-2500) 


131 NASHVILLE SKYLINE 

Bob Dylan (Columbia KCS 9825) 

(COL 18HO-0670) (COL 14H0-0670) (COL 16HO-0670) 

132 JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM PRISON 
(Columbia CS 96391) 

(18 10 0404) (14 10 0404) (16 10 0404) 

133 MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR 
Beatles (Capitol SMAL 2835) 

(8XT 2835) (4XT 2825) 

134 CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 

(Columbia GP-8) 

(Part I 18 10 0726) (Part II 18 10 0728) (16 BO 0854) 

135 JEAN 

Ray Conniff (Columbia CS 9920) 

(18 10 8771) (14 10 8770) (16 10 8771) 

136 DONOVAN’S GREATEST HITS 
(Epic BXN 26439) 

(N 18-10154) (N 14-10154) (N 16-10154) 

137 THE ASSOCIATION 

Warner Bros./7 Arts WS 1800) 

(8WM 1800) (CWM 1800) 

138 SPIRIT IN THE SKY 

Norman Greenbaum (Reprise RS 6365) 

139 WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS 
Joe Cocker (A&M SP 4182) 

(8T 4182) (4T 4182) (CS 4182) 

140 CREAM OF THE CROP 

Diana Ross & Supremes (Motown MS 694) 



CashBox Radio -TV 



News Report 


Tunin g In On . . . 

KAKC-Tulsa, Okla. 
'We Play So Much Music 


Covering Tulsa, Oklahoma. That’s 
. the mission of KAKC and, judging 
I from listener response and recent 
I rating surveys, that mission is bring 
accomplished quite handily. This 
I Drake station employs what is basi- 
j cally a Top 40 forrnat, with heavy 
emphasis on oldies and attention to 
worthwhile album tracks. 

The KAKC audience is composed 
primarily of 18-35 year olds, accord- 
ing to vice president and program 
director Lee Bayley. “They like the 
fact that we play so much music,” 
says Bayley “and they like the way 
our deejays sound.” Evidently, they 
do, since recent Pulse surveys put 
KAKC up at the top for every time 


KAKC — Tulsa, Oklahoma. 1000 
watts, day; 500 watts, night. S. Carl 
Mark, pres; Lee Bayley, v.p. & prog, 
dir; Bill Allred, gen. mgr; Watson 
Jeoks, news dir; A.C. Higgins, com- 
mercial mgr. Format: Top 40. Play 
' list: 30 records, plus 4-6 hitbounds, 
some album cuts occasionally. 

Deejays: Lee Bayley, 6-9 a.m.; Randy 
Castle, 9 a.m.-noon; Johnny Laine, 
noon-3 p.m.; Tom Gordon, 3-6 p.m.; 
Jim Peters, 6-9 p.m.; Bobby Otis, 
9-midnight; Dan Stone, 12-6 a.m.; 
Steve Hatley, Don Bishop, weekends. 

slot. 

Oldies play an important part in 
the station’s daily programming. Dur- 
ing the midday hours, and all night, 
approximately every third song is 
a hit of the past. “But it has to be a 
monster,” emphasizes Bayley. “We 
don’t play a song, merely because 
if is old: we play it because it was 
a phenomenal seller.” In addition, 
there are solid gold weekends, running 
from 3 p.m. Friday until 10 a.m. 
Monday. 

KAKC has adopted a policy of 
broadcating 13 commercial minutes 
per hour. There are news breaks at 
20 till during the morning drive; these 
are ten minutes in length. Twelve 
minute newcasts are aired at 11:40 
a.m.; 2:40 p.m.; 5:40 p.m.; 8:40 p.m. 
and 11: 40 p.m. 



GUY MEETS THAT GIRL - WLS 
Chicago's Chuck Buell hosted a press 
conference for high school and col- 
lege newspaper editors to preview 
the ABC Pictures’, “Jenny,” starring 
Mario Thomas. After the film was 
shown Buell and Miss Thomas, star 
of ABC Television’s “That Girl”, 
answered questions from the audi- 
ence. 


Major contest promotion are slated 
for broadcast about four times a 
ear. Specific shows, during the night 
ours, have additional contests. Re- 
cently, the station sponsored a Zodiac 
Jackpot, which matched listeners’ 
birthdates with astrological predic- 
tions, with winners receiving prizes, 
including personality profiles accord- 
ing to individual signs of the zodiac. 

A program designed to involve 
listeners directly is aired each Sun- 
day evening. Titled “Contact,” it 
throws open the KAKC phone lines 
to those who care to discuss cur- 
rent topics. “Contact” is hosted by 
two Tulsa area ministers who wel- 
come all relevant comments and 
suggestions on contemporary issues. 
Recent guests on the program have 
included the Tulsa chief of police 
“Everything we do has to be 
legitimate” says Bayley “and this 
is something which our audience 
recognizes. And another thing: we 
have outstanding relationship here 
between management and on-the-air 
personnel. Each does its own thing 
and it seems to work just fine.” 


Honor Jack At Copa 

NEW YORK — WMCA-New York’s 
deejay Jack Spector was honored 
last week with a special “Jack Spec- 
tor Night” hosted by singer Bobby 
Vinton at the Copacabana. It was 
Spector who launched Vinton’s career 
by introducing his first hit record, 
“Roses Are Red My Love,” via 
WMCA several years ago. 


Aldi Scores Exclusive 

LOS ANGELES — KHJ, Los Angeles 
newsman Roger Aldi became the 
first radio reporter in the world to 
tape an interview with Charles Man- 
son, chief suspect in the Sharon Tate 
murders. The thirty minute tape, 
made at the jail library where Man- 
son is preparing his defense, was 
broadcast in four segments over KHJ. 
The station has made it available to 
all other radio stations and news 
services. 


Capital Cities Buys 
9 Triangle Stations 

NEW YORK — Capital Cities Broad- 
casting Corporation has announced 
agreement to acquire nine television 
and radio stations from Triangle Pub- 
lications, Inc. The transaction is sub- 
ject to the approval of the Federal 
Communications Commission. 

Because of Federal limits on own- 
ership, Capital Cities will dispose of 
two of its own tv stations and the six 
Triangle radio stations acquired. They 
will retain the three Triangle tv sta- 
tions, WFIL-Philadelphia, WNHC- 
New Haven, Conn, and KFRE-Fresno, 
Calif. In a related action, Capital 
Cities has terminated their agree- 
ment to purchase WRCP-Philadelphia 
from Rust Craft Broadcasting Co. 


STATION BREAKS: 

Steve Clark, who recently left WOR- 
FM, has taken over evening duties on 
WCBS-FM, New York . . . Dave 
Herman joins deejay staff of WABC- 
FM, New York . . . Tom Cosgrove, Jr. 
has been named station mgr of 
WBBM-FM, Chicago . . . Newly named 
director of community affairs for 
WCBS-FM in New York is Charles 
Bailey . . . Nat Asch promoted to post 
of v.p. and general mgr, KMET-Los 
Angeles, so all six Metromedia FM 
outlets are now under separate man- 
agement . . . Our congrats to Warren 
(The Baron) Palmer, just appointed 
program director at WOKS-Columbus, 
Ga . . . Sam Riddle resigned from 
KHJ-Los Angeles to devote full time 
to other projects which include a 
theatre, as well as a personal man- 
agement and record company. 

Bob Green joined WKNR-Dearborn, 
Mich, as production director and 
noon to three air personality . . . 
Neil Boggs has taken over helm of 
WRC-TV, Washington, D.C.’s Dimen- 
sion Washington’ series, replacing 
John Masterman, reassigned to Wash- 
ington bureau of NBC News . . . Bill 
Manney has been appointed general 
mgr. of WBEE-Chicago, succeeding 
John Wilson . . . Art Eckman, sports 
director of KEX-Portland, Oregon, 
named that state’s Sportscaster of the 
Year . . . The Cleveland Police Ath- 
letic League was made $1,000 richer 
through sales of Apollo 11 commemor- 
ative LP’s produced and sold by 
WKYC-Cleveland . . . Dave Horwitz 
named to newly created position of 
assistant news director for KPIX-TV, 
San Francisco. 

Charles Larsen has become com- 
munity services director for WLWI- 
TV. Indianapolis . . . KNX-Los An- 
geles donated tapes of their recent 
program on drug abuse as gifts to all 
48 high schools in the city . . . Jim 
Stanley, WLW-Cincinnati’s helicopter 
traffic reporter, honored at annual 
luncheon of Greater Cincinnati Safety 
Council . . . Dale Moudy, general 
mgr. of KNBR-San Francisco, named 
chairman of the radio awards com- 
mittee in 20th annual Western Cre- 
ative Awards Competition . . . WRKO- 
Boston gave away more than $1700 in 
recent Zodiac jackpot contest. Also at 
WRKO, John Papas has been appoint- 
ed general sales mgr . . . Henry 
Richardson has become community 
relations administrator at WKYC-TV, 
Cleveland . . . Bob Braun celebrated 
his third anniversary as host of Avco 
Broadcasting’s midday variety show, 
‘50-50 Club.’ 


Musicor Gives Thanks 



Craig Dudley (left) , music director 
of WILS-Lansing, Michigan, receives 
a plaque from Chris Spinosa, vice 
president of Musicor Records, for 
his efforts in kicking off the label’s 
current hit single, “Jennifer Tom- 
kins,” by the Steeet People. Dudley 
is one of several radio personalities 
who are receiving these awards of 
recognition and appreciation of their 
support of this record from Musicor. 


WXIX-TV, Cincinnati, won national 
contest sponsored by CBS Enterprises 
for best promotion of syndicated pro- 
gram, ‘The Game Game’ . . . Con- 
dolences to family and friends of Lou 
Moretti, newswriter and desk editor 
for KNX-Los Angeles, who passed 
away last week . . . Charles Sinclair 
named to new post of director of 
communications to handle public re- 
lations for Radio Advertising Bureau 
. . . Hank O’Neil has moved into the 
morning deejay slot at WDEE-Detroit 
. . . WAYS-Charlotte, N.C. collected 
500 pairs of shoes for Goodwill In- 
dustries by offering listeners copies of 
Joe South’s new album in exchange. 

Bob Robertson, KVI-Seattle’s ‘Voice 
of the Washington Huskies,’ and 
KTNT-TV, Tacoma’s sports director, 
named Washington sportscaster of 
the year . . . The ‘Phil Donahue Show’ 
has added two markets: WLWI-Indi- 
anapolis and WCCO-Minneapolis . . . 
WCMS-Norfolk, Va. agreed to pur- 
chase 2500 snowballs, for a penny 
each, from listeners. Program direc- 
tor Joe Hoppel will store them for a 
summer promotion . . . New show on 
WMAL- Washington is “Auto World 
Digest ” . . . Dick Whittinghill of 
KMPC-Los Angeles will broadcast 
his Feb. 28 morning show from Cali- 
fornia Angels training camp . . . 
Sandy Jones has joined the sales 
promo staff of WASH-Washington, 
D.C. 


Richard Ridge, promotion mgr. of 



HIGH FLYING. .A&M recording artists. The Flying Burrito Bros., were auction- 
ed off to the highest bidder during the 14-hour' marathon staged by KMET-Los 
Angeles Free Clinic. Winner was the U.C.L.A. Mardi Gras Committee which 
“won" the Burritos for a student concert. KMET’s B. Mitchell Reed. Uncle “T” 
and Jack Margolis played host to scores of entertainers who donated time and 
talent to raise more than $20,000 for the clinic. 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


49 




Country Music Report 


MGM Re-Inks Williams, Glasers, Wooley-, 
Tillis, Walker, Morris Join Diskery 


NASHVILLE — MGM Records has re- 
signed three of its country acts — 
Hank Williams, Jr.. Tompall & the 
Glaser Brothers and Sheb Wooley 
(also known as Ben Colder) — and has 
signed three new country acts — Mel 
Tillis, Billy Walker and Lama Morris. 
Williams is one of the top country 
stars. Tompall and the Glasers, Mel 
Tillis and Billy Walker are all heavy 
names in the C&W world. Sheb Wooley 
is known for his comedy. Lamar Mor- 
ris is a newcomer. 

Mike Curb, vice president of MGM, 
Incorporated, and president of MGM 
Records, flew from the West Coast to 
Nashville to announce and sign the 
artists on February 18. The acts, all of 
whom, with the exception of Tompall 
& the Glaser Brothers, are managed 
by Buddy Lee. will be included in a na- 
tional publicity, promotion and 
exploitation campaign in conjunction 
with their latest single and album re- 
leases. 

First on the agenda will include a 
special promotion for the Hank Wil- 
liams, Jr. album of “Sunday Morning” 
which will be tied in with Hank, Jr.'s 
new TV Show “Sun Country” now 
being tested in two markets, KTXL in 
Sacramento and KSAT in San Antonio. 
Additional markets which will be an- 
nounced later will also tie in with the 
artist’s new album. Plans call for 
slides on the TV screen showing a 
background of Hank, Jr.'s “Sunday 
Morning" album with an over-lay of 
lettering announcing playing time and 


date. Special posters for record shops 
are being prepared which will mu- 
tually advertise Hank, Jr.'s TV Show 
and the “Sunday Morning” album. In 
addition, photos of Hank, Jr. taken on 
location in Cypress Gardens, Florida, 
where the series was produced, will be 
sent to TV and record review editors 
on national magazines and news- 
papers as well as wire services 
throughout the country. Plans are also 
being formulated to tie in with national 
advertisers who will sponsor the TV 
Show. Streamers and other point-of- 
purchase display material plugging 
the artist, the TV Show and the album 
will be used. 

New albums and singles by Mel 
Tillis, Billy Walker, Lamar Morris and 
Sheb Wooley will be announced jointly 
by Mike Curb and Buddy Lee. 

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers have 
just completed the soundtrack album 
for the MGM film . . . tick , . . tick . . . 
tick . . .” which will be released March 
1. A single titled "All That Keeps Ya 
Goin ,” from the album, is the theme 
from the picture and it is being rushed 
as a special release to tie in with cur- 
rent play dates of the picture. 

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers are 
currently on a large-scale personal 
appearance tour doing one nighters 
across the country. They will promote 
and publicize both their single and 
album in the various cities that coin- 
cide with their personal apiJcarance 
tour and the opening of “. . . tick . . . 
tick . . . tick . . .” 



WE’RE NOT GOING TO LOSE THIS BOY — MGM Records was anxious to re- 
sign ace country chanter Hank Williams, Jr., and the star was glad to put his 
name on the dotted line. The artist, pen in hand, is shown w'ith (left to right) Mike 
Curb, president of MGM Records, who is presenting the artist with the RIAA gold 
album aw'ard for the soundtrack album of “Your Cheatin Heart,” in which Hank 
starred in the role of his famous father; B. J. McElwee, Nashville promo man for 
Transcontinental Distributing, which distributes MGM in many parts of the 
country: and Buddy Lee, manager of Hank and head of Buddy Lee Attractions. 



Country Roundup 


Jack Stapp, president and founder of 
Tree International, recently delivered 
a lecture on “The Business of Music 
Business " to Nashville junior exec- 
utives at Aquinas College . . . The 
Shelby Singleton Corporation 
presented a midnight blue Cadillac to 
Mike Lawing of Berto’s Record 
Distributors in Charlotte, N.C. on his 
election as “Promotion Man of the 
Year” for his efforts on behalf of the or- 
ganization . . . Hubert Long, president, 
Hubert Long International, reports 
"Country Crossroads,” a 15-minute 
radio show starring Leroy Van Dyke 
and presented by the Southern Baptist 
Radio and Television Commission, is 
receiving fantastic nation-wide audi- 
ence reception. Since January, more 
than 350 stations have taken ad- 
vantage of the show, which is offered 
free upon request by the commis- 
sion. "Country Crossroads” features 
Bill Mack as announcer and Van Dyke 
as host and consists of interviews with 
various artists, on-the-spot reports and 
“Country Scrapbook,” a feature spot- 
lighting a different country great each 
week. The highly successful show is 
one of 40 non-sectarian public service 
radio and television programs 
produced weekly and distributed by 
the Southern Baptist Radio and Televi- 


sion Commission . , . Hickory Records' 
Don Gibson recently taped the syn- 
dicated “Mid-Western Hayride Show " 
in Cincinnati, Gibson's latest release is 
“Don't Take All Your Loving” . . . 

Monument Records' “Billy Walker 
Salutes the Country Music Hall of 
Fame " album has been aw'arded “Best 
Selection of the Decade” according to 
Rafael Alicea Vallejo, president of the 
Nashville Sound of Puerto Rico. Billy 
Walker's just released single is 
“Darlin' Days ” . . , Chart recording 
artist Dianne Leigh has been named 
Canada's #1 Female Country Singer 
for the fifth consecutive year by RPM 
Magazine, a Canadian music trade 
publication. The Canadian lass is a 
regular on the Carl Smith syndicated 
TV Show, which covers most of 
Canada and is now being shown in a 
number of U.S. markets ... Tommy 
Cash will be speaking of cash for the 
Dial Finance Corp., on stations 
throughout the South and West be- 
ginning in March. Tommy cut the 
jingles and commercial plugs for the 
company recently under the direction 
of a Chicago ad firm. Tommy’s recent 
hit on Epic is “Six White Horses” . . . 
An estimated 15,000 were in at- 
tendance when Conway Twitty and his 
Twitty Birds, along with Ernest Tubb 



Setting It Up 

William Golden of the Oak Ridge Boys Gospel 
Group and promoter J.G. Whitfield of Pensacola, 
Florida, have named Nashville as the site for the 
first International Gospel Festival to be held July 
10-11 at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium. 
Named as sponsor for the festival is the Fire- 
men's Benefit Fund, Wade Hampton, Director. 
Top gospel talent from the United States and 
several foreign countries will convene for the 
two day gathering. 


and the Texas Troubadours and Peggy 
Sue perfoi’med Satui'day night, Feb- 
ruary 14th at what is billed as “The 
World's Lai’gest Dance” in Houston's 
Astro Hall. Presented yearly by Radio 
Station KIKK in Houston as a pi’eview 
to the annual Houston Fat Stock Show 
and Rodeo with all pi'oceeds going to 
worthy charities in the Houston area, 
the entii'e four hour Dance was re- 
corded by Decca Records with VP 
Owen Bradley in Houston supervising 
the recording operation . . . 

March 20 is the date set by 
Soundville of Houston, Texas for 
opening of their new studio facilities. 
Execs Johnny Nash and Marilyn 
Von Steiger in Music City recently 
shopping around for personnel to staff 
new facilities . . . Johnny Cash, along 
with his wife, June Carter Cash, has 
been named to serve as State Honor- 
ary Chairman of the United Cerebral 
Palsy of Tennessee Telethon to be 
aired March 7 in Nashville 
Imperial's Penny DeHaven guested 
recently on Jim Ed Brown’s syn- 
dicated “Country Place”. Penny's hot 
from the press “I Feel Fine” is country 
version of the Beatles' tune . . . Future 
appearances by Skeeter Davis and 
George Hamilton IV will be billed as 
“The Skeeter Davis and George Hamil- 
ton IV Show,” according to Joe Taylor 
of the Joe Taylor Artist Agency, who 
further states that negotiations are 
underway for an African tour for the 
RCA artists . . . Chart Records pres- 
ident Slim Williamson reports that 
single sales reached an all time high 
for his company in January, exceeding 
any previous months by nlore than 20 
per cent . . . Jim Nesbitts’ “Runnin” 
Bare” is currently the hottest item in 
the Chart catalog, although some 
country stations are refusing to play it, 
describing it as “a little too risque” . . . 

. . . Joe Moscbeo, pianist and man- 


ager of the Imperials Quartet has an- 
nounced the signing of the Imperials to 
appear with Jimmy Dean on the na- 
tionally syndicated Mike Douglas 
Show, Taping is scheduled for March 
25. 26 and 27. Moscheo further an- 
nounced that after a tremendous 
success in Las Vegas with Elvis Pres- 
ley the Imps have been signed to again 
appear with Presley. The next appear- 
ance is scheduled for Houston, Texas 
and the Astrodome February 25 thru 
March 1 . . . Wendy Bagwell and the 
Sunliters have signed a recording 
contract with Canaan Records of 
Waco, Texas . . . Songstress Georgia 
Gibbs, who recently signed an e.x- 
clusive recording contract with 
Starday-King, will be visiting Nash- 
ville the first week in March to cut a 
country music album . . . The Tokyo 
Happy' Coats, five lovely young 
Japanese girls, were in Cincinnati re- 
cently for a series of recording 
sessions at the Starday-King studios 
with producer Darrell Glenn. The five 
young ladies not only sing but also 
play a total of 19 instruments between 
them. After the waxing is completed, 
the Tokyo Happy Coats head for Las 
Vegas and a six-weeks engagement at 
the New Frontier. 

Following three months of experi- 
mental country and western program- 
ing, KXOA-FM Radio in Sacramento, 
California, in response to listener 
requests, is increasing its broadcast 
schedule from 18 to 24 hours. 

Jimmy Case has established a new 
talent/management agency. Showcase 
Talent, at 1057 W. Broad St., Suite 23, 
Falls Church, Virginia 22046. Red 
Wilcox, former C&W manager and 
deejay, is general manager. Case 
himself will join Showcase’s roster 
after completion of his current 
schedule of appearances at the Amer- 
ican Military Clubs in Vietnam. 


50 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


/w n wy ///f nv /77/n^\ 

Country LP Reviews 

WW //// WW //// \\Au//^ 

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IT’S JUST A MATTER OF TIME — Sonny 
James — Capitol ST 432 
Titled after his current hit single, the South- 
ern Gentleman’s new album is bound to please 
his legion of fans and should be soaring up the 
Top Country Albums chart in short order. Tee- 
ing off with “It’s Just A Matter Of Time,’’ the 
ace chanter goes on to deliver nine other 
tunes, most of which he is co-writer of. Be 
sure and stock lots of this one. 



UPTOWN COUNTRY GIRL — Lynn Anderson 
— Chart CH 1028 

Lynn Anderson recently signed with Colum- 
bia, but she left behind some strong material 
at Chart, including this album, which contains 
her current hit, “I’ve Been Everywhere.” 
Lynn’s fans, of whom there are an increasing 
number, should want to latch on to this one 
right away. Chart action should be beginning 
in the very near future. 



LITTLE BOY SAD — Bill Phillips — Decea 
DL 75182 

Bill Phillips should have a substantial seller 
in his possession with his new LP. Set is titled 
after and contains the singer’s recent hit and 
should do good things for his reputation. Se- 
lections, in addition to “Little Boy Sad,” in- 
clude “Tall Oak Tree,” “Big Rock Candy 
Mountain” and “Spanish Eyes.” Should be a 
chart spot waiting for this one. 









1 Kra 







INTRODUCING . . . Singer-songwriter Tom Paxton, who recently signed as a 
writer with United Artists Music Group, was introduced to the music industry 
and press people in Nashville last week at a party given at RCA’s recording 
studios by UA. In the top photo, Paxton (center) and his wife. Midge, are shown 
with (left to right) Jack Lee, national professional manager of the UA Music 
Group; Danny Davis leader of the RCA band, the Nashville Brass; and Murray 
Deutch, head of the UA Music Group. Shown in the bottom photo are (left to 
right) Eddie Reeves, professional manager of the UA Music Group on the West 
Coast; Jack Lee; Jim Vienneau, A&R head of MGM in Nashville; and Billy Edd 
Wheeler, professional manager of the UA Music Group in Nashville. 



Top Country Albums 


1 THE GOLDEN CREAM 

OF THE COUNTRY 1 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Sun 108) 

2 THE BEST OF CHARLEY 

PRIDE 2 

(RCA LSP 4223) 

3 STORY SONGS OF THE 

TRAINS AND RIVERS 3 

Johnny Cash (Sun 104) 

4 OKIE FROM MUSKOGEE 7 

Merle Haggard (Capitol ST 384) 

5 MEL TILLIS’ GREATEST 

HITS 4 

Kapp (KS 3589) 


6 HELLO, I’M JOHNNY CASH 10 

(Columbia KCS 9943) 

7 HERE’S LORETTA SINGING^ 
WINGS UPON YOUR HORNS 8 

Loretta Lynn (Decca DL 75163) 

8 COUNTRY MOOG/SWITCHED 


ON NASHVILLE 9 

Gil Trythall (Athena 6003) 

9 MOVIN’ ON 5 

Danny Davis & Nashville Brass 
(RCA LSP 4232) 

10 TRY A LITTLE KINDNESS 12 

Glen Campbell (Capitol SW 389) 

11 TAMMY’S GREATEST HITS 6 

Tammy Wynette (Epic BN 26486) 

12 JUST PLAIN CHARLEY 15 

Charley Pride (RCA LSP 4290) 

13 THE ASTRODOME 

PRESENTS IN PERSON 11 

Sonny James (Capitol ST 320) 

14 SHE EVEN WOKE ME UP 

TO SAY GOODBYE 16 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash SRS 67128) 

15 THE WAYS TO LOVE 

A MAN 17 

Tammy Wynette (Epic BN 26519) 


16 

JOHNNY CASH AT 



SAN QUENTIN 

(Columbia CS 9827) 

13 

17 

TO SEE MY ANGEL CRY 

Conway Twitty (Decca DL 75172) 

18 

18 

FROM VEGAS TO MEMPHIS 

Elvis Presley (RCA LSP 6020) 

14 

19 

EVERLOVIN’SOULOF 



ROY CLARK 

(Dot DLT 25972) 

21 

20 

SONGS THAT MADE 



COUNTRY GIRLS FAMOUS 

Lynn Anderson (Chart CHS 1022) 

20 

21 

JACK GREENE & 



JEANNIE SEELY 

(Decc,a DL 75171) 

23 

22 

WHERE GRASS WON’T GROW24 

George Jones (Musicor MS 3181) 

23 

WAYLON 

Waylon Jennings (RCA LSP 4260) 

26 

24 

BIG IN VEGAS 

The Buck Owens Show (Capitol ST 413) 

25 

25 

THE FAIREST OF THEM ALL 

Dolly Parton (RCA LSP 4288) 

29 

26 

I’LL STILL BE MISSING YOU 

Warner Mack (Decca DL 75165) 

27 

27 

HERE’S A TOAST 



TO MAMA 

Charlie Louvin (Capitol ST 416) 

28 

28 

HAUNTED HOUSE 



CHARLIE BROWN 

Compton Brothers (Dot 25974) 

30 

29 

IT’S JUST A MATTER OF TIME- 

Sonny James (Capitol ST 432) 

30 

COOKIN’ 

Jerry Reed (RCA LSP 4293) 

— 


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Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


51 



mammmmmm 

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tW'; 


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M THE BEST OF victor 

JIM REEVES 


The Best of Jim Reeves, Voi. I 
LSP-2890; P8S-1 775 Stereo 8. 
PK-1 1 75 Cassette 

The Best of Jim' Re%v6s, Vol. It 
PBS- 1521 Stereo 8; 

LS'P-3482 (e). 

The Best of Jim Reeves Vol, It ! 
lSP-4187 


JIMREEVES 


Records 
and Tapes 





Bill 












Country Top 60 



Published by: Contention Music 
1513 Hawkins St. 
Ndshville/lenn. 


16 BROWN-EYED 
HANDSOME MAN 

(Arc — BMI) 15 

Waylon Jennings (RCA 0281) 

17 ONE MINUTE PAST ETERNITY 

(Hilo/Gold Dust- BMI) 17 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Sun 1 107) 

18 FANCY 

(Larry Shayne — ASCAP) 9 

Bobbie Gentry (Capitol 2675) 

19 THEN HE TOUCHED ME 

(AIGallico-BMI) 27 

Jean Shepard (Capitol 2694) 

20 THERE’S A STORY 
(COIN’ ROUND) 

(Acuff-Rose — BMI) 18 

Dottie West & Don (jibson (RCA 0291) 

21 NOBODY’S FOOL 

(Tuckahoe — BMI) 21 

Jim Reeves (RCA 0286) 

22 CHARLIE BROWN 

(Tiger— BMI) 24 

Compton Brothers (Dot 17336) 

23 TENNESSEE BIRD WALK 

(Black Bay — BMI) 35 

Jack Blanchard & Misty Morgan (Wayside 010) 

24 WABASH CANNONBALL 

(Peer Int’l — BMI) 26 

Nashville Brass (RCA 9785) 

25 SHE CHEATS ON ME 

(Acuff-Rose — BMI) 25 

Glenn Barber (Hickory 1157) 

26 TOMORROW IS FOREVER 

(Owepar— BMI) 37 

Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton (RCA 9799) 

27 I’VE BEEN EVERYWHERE 

(Hill & Range — BMI) 34 

Lynn Anderson (Chart 5053) 

28 SITTIN’ IN ATLANTA STATION 

(Atlantic - ASCAP) 30 

Nat Stuckey (RCA 9786) 

29 ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM 

(House of Bryant — BMI) 41 

Glen Campbell & Bobbie Gentry (Capitol 2745) 

30 DADDY COME AND GET ME 

(Owepar— BMI) 31 

Dolly Parton (RCA 9784) 


31 

TAKE A LETTER MARIA 



(Four Star — BMI) 

Anthony Armstrong Jones (Chart 5045) 

32 

32 

WE’RE GONNA GET TOGETHER 


(Blue Book — BMI) 

Buck Owens & Susan Raye (Capitol 2731) 

42 

33 

MY WOMAN, MY WOMAN, 

MY WIFE 



(Mariposa — BMI) 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 45091) 

48 

34 

KENTUCKY RAIN 



Elvis Presley S-P-R 

Elvis Presley (RCA 9791) 

46 

35 

COUNTRY GIRL 



(Shelby Singleton — BMI) 

Jeannie C. Riley (Plantation 44) 

44 

36 

ROCK ISLAND LINE 



(Hi-Lo- BMI) 

Johnny Cash (Sun 1111) 

38 

37 

I’LL MAKE AMENDS 



(Lowery — BMI) 

Roy Drusky (Mercury 73007) 

40 

38 

WHERE GRASS WON’T GROW 


(Glad - BMI) 

George Jones (Musicor 1392) 

52 

39 

HERE’S A TOAST TO MAMA 



(Blue Book — BMI) 

Charlie Louvin (Capitol 2703) 

43 

40 

LITTLE JOHNNY FROM 

DOWN THE STREET 



(Sure-Fire — BMI) 

The Wilburn Brothers (Decca 32608) 

49 

41 

MAMA, 1 WON’T BE 

WEARING A RING 



(Hill & Range/Blue Crest — BMI) 

Peggy Little (Dot 17338) 

50 

42 

YOUR HUSBAND, MY WIFE 

(Pocket Full of Tunes/Jillbern — BMI) 
Bobby Bare & Skeeter Davis (RCA 9789) 

47 

43 

LORD IS THAT ME 



(Blue Crest — BMI) 

Jack Greene (Decca 32631) 

51 

44 

OCCASIONAL WIFE 



(Hartack — BMI) 

Faron Young (Mercury 73018) 

54 

45 

WISH 1 DIDN’T HAVE TO 
MISS YOU SO 



(Tree — BMI) 

36 


Jack Greene & Jeannie Seely (Decca 32580) 


46 TWO SEPARATE BAR STOOLS 

(Party Time — BMI) 45 

Wanda Jackson (Capitol 2693) 

47 IS ANYBODY COIN’ TO 
SAN ANTONE 

(Tree, BMI) — 

Charley Pride (RCA 9806) 

48 I KNOW HOW 

(Sure-Fire, BWiI) — 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32637) 

49 BABY, BABY (I KNOW 
YOU’RE A LADY) 

(AlGallico-BMI) 22 

David Houston (Epic 10539) 

50 I WALKED OUT ON HEAVEN 

(Minstrel, BMI) — 

Hank Williams, Jr. (MGM 14107) 

51 THEN SHE’S A LOVER 

(Russell Carson — ASCAP) 55 

Roy Clark (Dot 17335) 

52 THE ARMS OF MY WEAKNESS 

(Barmour — BMI) 53 

Darrell McCall (Wayside 008) 

53 THE GOLDEN ROCKET 

(Hill & Range -BMI) 56 

Jim & Jesse (Epic 10563) 

54 YOU GOTTA HAVE A LICENSE 

(Central Songs, BMI) 

Porter Wagoner (RCA 9802) 

55 ANGEL OF THE MORNING 

(Blackwood — FMI) 57 

Connie Eaton iChart 5048) 

56 PUT A LITTLE LOVE IN 
YOUR HEART 

(Unart -BMI) 58 

Susan Raye (Capitol 2701) 

57 NORTHEAST ARKANSAS 
MISSISSIPPI COUNTRY 
BOOTLEGGER 

(Tree, BMI) — 

Kenny Price (RCA 9792) 

58 PULL MY STRING AND 
WIND ME UP 

(Milene - ASCAP) 60 

Carl Smith (Columbia 45086) 

59 THE CHICAGO STORY 

(New Keys, BMI) — 

Jimmy Snyder (Wayside 009) 

60 A LOVER’S QUESTION 

(Progressive/Eden, BMI) — 

Del Reeves & The (joodtime Charlies 
(U.A. 50622) 


1 IT’S JUST A MATTER OF TIME 


(Eden -BMI) 10 

Sonny James (Capitol 2700) 

2 WELFARE CADILAC 

(Bull Fighter — BMI) 1 

Guy Drake (Royal American 1) 

3 HONEY COME BACK 

(Jobete-BMI) 7 

Glen Campbell (Capitol 2718) 

4 IF I WERE A CARPENTER 

(Faithful Virtue — BMI) 3 

Johnny Cash & June Carter (Columbia 45064) 

5 THAT’S WHEN SHE STARTED 
TO STOP LOVING YOU 

(Tree — BMI) 4 

Conway Twitty (Decca 32599) 

6 WALK A MILE IN MY SHOES 

(Lowery — BMI) 5 

Joe South (Capitol 2704) 

7 THEFIGHTIN’SIDEOFME 

(Blue Book- BMI) 12 

Merle Haggard & The Strangers 
(Capitol 2719) 

8 I’LL SEE HIM THROUGH 

(AIGallico-BMI) 13 

Tammy Wynette (Epic 10571) 

9 SHE’LL BE HANGING 
ROUND SOMEWHERE 

(Sawgrass — BMI) 8 

Mel Tillis(Kapp 2072) 

10 A WEEK IN A COUNTRY 
JAIL 

(Newkeys — BMI) 11 

Tom T. Hall (Mercury 72998) 

11 WINGS UPON YOUR HORNS 

(Sure-Fire — BMI) 2 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 32586) 

12 SIX WHITE HORSES 

(Peer Int'l - BMI) 6 

Tommy Cash (Epic 10540) 

13 I’M A LOVER (NOT A 
FIGHTER) 

(Crestmoor — BMI) 19 

Skeeter Davis (RCA 0292) 

14 ONCE MORE WITH FEELING 

(Combine — BMI) 20 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash 2257) 

15 HELLO I’M A JUKEBOX 

(Newkeys — BMI) 14 

George Kent (Mercury 72985) 







Country Reviews 


( Picks ot the Weak 




Picks oiihe Week 

BILL ANDERSON (Decca 32643) 

Love Is A Sometimes Thing (3:01) (Stallion, BMI — Howard) 

Bill Anderson should have a smash hit in his possession with this Jan 
Howard-penned love ode. "Love Is A Sometimes Thing" has a winning sound 
and should be on the charts in the very near future. Flip: "And I'm Still Missing 
You” (2:23) (Glaser, BMI — Glaser, Payne) 


LYNN ANDERSON (Columbia 45101) 

Stay There, Till I Get There (2:17) (Al Gallico, BMI — Sutton) 

Lynn Anderson's first Columbia release is a real powerhouse that should de- 
light her many fans. Her last single for her old label. Chart, is currently climbing 
up the charts, and this one should follow it in the near future. Flip: "I’d Run A 
Mile To You” (2:06) (Al Gallico, BMI — Sutton, Curtis) 


PEGGY SUE (Decca 32640) 

After The Preacher’s Gone (2:32) (Sure-Fire, BMI — Walls, Lyon) 

Peggy Sue had a hit a little while back with "I'm Gettin’ Tired Of Babyin’ 
You,” and she should repeat her success with “After The Preacher's Gone.” 
Strong outing. Flip: "You Can’t Pull The Wool Over My Eyes" (2:02) (Coal- 
miner’s, BMI — Wells) 


BILLY WALKER (Monument 1189) 

Darling Days (2:58) (Blue Crest, BMI — Frazier, Shafer) 

Here's a real good tune that should do real good things for Billy Walker. 
The chanter’s in really fine form on this one, and he’s bound to captivate a 
host of listeners. Flip: "Pretend You Don’t See Me” (2:18) (Matamoros, BMI — 
Walker) 




The Hottest Records 
In The Nation 

"TENN. BIRD WALK” 


J ack Blanchard & Misty Morgan 

WRITTEN BY: JACK BLANCHARD 
PRODUCED BY: LITTLE RICHIE JOHNSON 


CHICAGO STORY 


Jimmy 

Snyder 


WRITTEN BY: TOM T. HALL 
PRODUCED BY: LITTLE RICHIE JOHNSON 


WAYSIDE RECORDS 

DISTRIBUTED BY MERCURY/SMASH 
NATIONAL PROMOTION: 

LITTLE RICHIE JOHNSON 

BELEN, NEW MEXICO 
( 505 ) 864 7185 


WEBB PIERCE (Decca 32641) 

Merry-Go-Round World (2:15) (Wandering Acres, SESAC — Pierce, Fisher) 

Should be a nice amount of spins and sales on tap for Webb Pierce with his 
new single. “Merry-Go-Round World” is a contagious song, and Webb puts it 
across in style. Flip: "Fool’s Night Out” (2:26) (Wandering Acres, SESAC — 
Pierce, Forshee, Fisher) 


RED SOVINE (Starday 889) 

I Know You’re Married But I Love You Still (2:24) (Lois, BMI — Reno, Maaaha) 
Red Sovine offers a love ode that’s full of pathos and should tug the heart 
strings of numerous C&W listeners. Look for this one on the charts. "Money, 
Marbles And Chalk” (2:18) (Lois, BMI - Eckler) 


Best Bets 



NORMA JEAN (RCA 9809) 

Somebody’s Gonna Plow Your Field 

(2:07) (C'hu-Fin/Shelby Singleton, BMI 
-Bluefield, Duncan) Could be good 
sales in store for Norma Jean with 
this infectious bouncer. Watch it. 
Flip; "Two Good Reasons" (3:09) 
(Pamper. BMI-Cochran, Williams) 


SUE THOMPSON (Hickory 1560) 

I Just Keep Hangin’ On (2: 50) (Milene, 
ASCAP-Shondell) Sue 'Thompson 
could grab attention with this romance 
ode. Scan it. Flip: “Lost Highway” 
(2:08) (Fred Rose, BMI-Payne) 


JIMMY NALL (Chart 5057) 

Spell Of The Freight 'Train (1:48) 
(Jack, BMI-Clement) Brisk-paced ode 
about the lure of riding the rails. Could 
go somewhere for Jimmy Nall. Flip; 
“Such A Short Time” (2:34) (Tree 
Int'l. BMLMcKinnon) 


PAUL RICHEY (Columbia 45102) 

Billy Love-Beads, College Joe And Old 
Tennessee (3: 10) (Green Grass, BMI 
-Putman) Song about three soldiers 
from different backgrounds who fight 
together for America. Could draw at- 
tention. Flip: “White Collars” (Algee, 
BMI-Richey) 


NICK NIXON (Kapp 2077) 

Loser’s Cocktail (2: 12) (Champion, 
BMI-Earl, Nixon, Crutchfield) In this 
song, a bartender mixes his specialty 
for all the strayed souls who come into 
the “loser’s lounge.” Could do some- 
thing. Flip: “My Darlin' Sarah” (4:05) 
(Champion, BMI-Crutchfield) 


BOB YARBROUGH (Chart 5058) 
Tonight I’ll Put It To Her (2: 18) 

(Yonah, BMI-Yarbrough) Might be 
some nice sales action in the cards 
for Bob Yarbrough with this love 
ditty. Give it a try. Flip: “In The Palm 
Of My Hand” (2:36) (Yonah, BMI- 
Yarbrough) 


LINDA GAIL LEWIS (Smash 2261) 

My Heart Was The Last One To Know 
(2:44) (Combine, BMI-Kristofferson, 
Silverstein) Feelingful love ballad 
could go places for Linda Gail Lewis. 
Give it a spin. No information avail- 
able on the flip side at this time. 


NORRO WILSON (Smash 2262) 

In The Loneliness Of The City (2:08) 
(Al Gallico. BMI-Wilson, Bruce, Har- 
vey) Give a listen to Norro Wilson's 
performance on this energetic outing. 
Deck could go somewhere. No infor- 
mation available on the flip side at 
this time. 


CARL PHILLIPS (Spar 30035) 

Big Vine Covered House (2:48) (Tree 
Int’l, BMI-Kirby, Bynum) Carl Phillips 
could make noise with this song about 
a man who seeks wealth. Side has a 
surprise ending. Flip: “Such A Short 
Time” (2:34) (Tree Int'l, BMI-Mc- 
Kinnon) 


JIMMIE LEE MORRIS (LHI 23) 

Talk About Lonesome (2: 16) (Attache, 
BMI-Morris, Hendrix) Jimmie Lee 
Morris may stir up interest with this 
toe-tapper. Eye it. Flip: “Fill It Up” 
(Attache, BMI-Morris) 


MARVIN RAINWATER (Warner Bros. 
7373) 

Let Me Live Again (2: 28) (Jack, BMI- 
Zanetis) Could be nice things in store 
for Marvin Rainwater as a result of 
this feelingful love ballad. Try it. Flip: 
“I Love My Country” (3: 16) (Brave, 
Three, BMI-Rainwater) 


MATTFRIEMON (Klondike 2230) 
Mental Revenge (2:27) (Cedarwood, 
BMI-Tillis) Matt Friemon could gar- 
ner airplay and sales with this Mel 
Tillis-penned song. Merits a spin. Flip: 
“The Cheater” (Holiday Inn, BMI- 
Friemon) 


54 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 



February 28, 1970 



The annual “Grand Gala Du Disque,” organized by Holland’s record industry, takes place this Friday (27) 
at the Amsterdam RAI Building. Participating artists are (top row, left to right): Jose Feliciano, Four Tops, 
Sergio Mendes ’66; (second row): the Flock, Anita Kerr Singers (with Liesbeth List shown under the 
group), Heintje, James Last; (third row): Edwin Hawkins Singers, Nana Mouskouri, Bobbie Gentry, Serge 
Reggiani; (fourth row): Frida Boccara, J. Vincent Edwards, the Cats, Rita Reys and Adele Bloemendaal. 
Also appearing in the show is British rock group Procol Harum, while Maurice Chevalier will be guest of 
honor. The show will be telecast in color. 



Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


55 


f .— Great Britain 


Great Britain's Best Seilers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 

11 4 *Love Grows, Edison Lighthouse, Bell, Mustard/Schroeder 

Mason 

2 3 4 Leavin’ On A Jet Plane, Peter Paul & Mary, Warner Bros. 

Harmony 

3 7 3 *Witches’ Promise/Teacher, Jethro Tull, Chrysalis, Chrysalis 

4 2 6 *Reflections Of My Life, Marmalade, Decca, Walrus 

5 11 2 *Temma Harbour, Mary Hopkin, Apple, Major Oak/Rak 

6 4 5 *Come And Get It, Badfinger, Apple, Northern 

7 9 4 *rm A Man, Chicago, CBS, Island 

8 17 2 Let’s Work Together, Canned Heat, Liberty, United Artists 

9 5 5 *Friends, Arrival, Decca, Carlin/Enquiry 

10 6 11 Two Little Boys, Rolf Harris, Columbia, Darewski 

11 — 1 Venus, Shocking Blue, Penny Farthing, Page Full of Hits 

12 — II Want You Back, Jackson 5, Tamla Motown, Jobete/Carlin 

13 8 13 Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town, Kenny Rogers & The 

First Edition, Reprise, Southern 

14 15 3 1 Can’t Get Next To You, Temptations, Tamla Motown, 

Jobete/Carlin 

15 10 10 All I Have To Do Is Dream, Bobbie Gentry, Glen Campbell, 

Capitol, Acuff-Rose 

16 12 6 Someday We’ll Be Together, Diana Ross/Supremes, Tamla 

Motown, Jobete/Carlin 

17 20 2 Both Sides Now, Judy Collins, Elektra, Essex 

18 — 1 *Hitchin’ A Ride, Vanity Fare, Page One, Intune 

19 18 2 Wedding Bell Blues, 5th Dimension, Liberty, 20th Century 

20 13 10 Suspicious Minds, Elvis Presley, RCA, London Tree 

*Local copyrights 


Great Britain's Top Ten LP's 


1. Led Zeppelin 2, Atlantic 

2. Motown Chartbusters Vol. 3, Tamla Motown 

3. Abbey Road, The Beatles, Apple 

4. Easy Rider, Various Artists, Stateside 

5. Let It Bleed, Rolling Stones, Decca 

6. Tom Jones Live In Las Vegas, Decca 

7. Tighten Up Vol. 2, Various Artists, Trojan 

8. Johnny Cash At San Quentin, CBS 

9. Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Simon & Garfunkel, CBS 

10. Basket Of Light, Pentangle, Transatlantic 


Pitney Starts Tour Of UK 


The long-established music pub- 
lishing house of Novello and Co., 
which is the largest educational pub- 
lishing entity in Britain, is the latest 
target for takeover bidders. Music 
Sales (UK), the British arm of Music 
Sales of New York, offered £25. for 
each £10 ordinary share in Novello. 
This bid followed rumors of a previ- 
ous offer at £22 10 shillings per share. 
MSC, which incorporates Amsco Mu- 
sic, Consolidated Music Publishers, 
Oak Publications, and Embassy-Dor- 
sey Brothers Music, made its offer 
through Bankers Trust International, 
declaring it had no intention of alter- 
ing the basic concept and character 
of the Novelio business if its bid 
proved successful. Its aim would be 
to enlarge and diversify the com- 
pany’s activities to achieve extra busi- 
ness, specifically by entering the 
zone of pop music. The Novello board 
through the firm’s merchant bankers 
S. G. Warburg nixed the bid, saying 
£25 per share was inadequate in rela- 
tion to the net tangible asset value 
of the shares, the value of Novello 
copyrights, and the climbing figures 
over the last five years in respect of 
performing fee and music hire re- 
ceipts. The Novello board and others 
control over 50% of the company 
capital, thereby thwarting the MSC 
bid by this rejection. However, No- 
vello is believed to have received an 
approach from another interested 
party which may lead to a higher 
offer. 

More clouds are gathering over the 
British record retailing scene. Pye 
Records has announced the closure 
of its Birmingham sales depot ef- 
fective February 28th, and the dele- 
tion of over 1,700 dealers from its van 
call lists because they are not provid- 
ing the company with enough business. 
From April 1st the minimum order 
level acceptable to Pye will be raised 
from £5 to £10, with the service charge 
remaining at five shillings. Pye mar- 
keting manager Tom Grantham stat- 
ed the Birmingham depot was closing 
on account of the expiring of the 
lease on the premises and no suitable 
alternative location could be found 
in the area. The van call list was be- 
ing pruned in order to give more ac- 
tive dealers more time and better 
service. Low-register dealers doing 
less than £30. a month were being 
“phased out” in every area. This 
move, coupled with strengthening 
rumors that the major disk companies 
are contemplating abolition of the 
five per cent returns allowance to 
dealers, heralds an almost inevitable 
contraction in record retailing through- 
out the country, with only the chains 
like Harlequin, Disci and W.H. Smith 
and the enterprising and specialist 
individual dealers in positions of re- 
lative economic health. 

Liberty-United Artists is readying 
a major entry into the European tape 
market this spring. Liberty-UA vp 
Lee Mendell anticipates a 75% com- 
mon denominator release in Britain, 
Germany and France laced with some 
local product, but marketing deci- 
sions would rest with the individual 
Liberty-UA offices in the countries 
concerned. Mendell reckons a mas- 
sive European tape launch utilising 
indentical packaging, display mate- 
rial and merchandising aids will give 
the company the advantage of estab- 
lishing an image. Liberty-UA stereo 
tape general manager Earl Horwitz 
is visiting Europe to confer with all 
branches in preparation for the launch, 
which will total forty titles. Mendell 
stated the company had no preference 
in the matter of eight-track or cas- 
sette system, but hinted he believed 
eight-track would eventually triumph 
in European markets. Liberty-UA is 
also considering reactivating its bud- 
get price Sunset label with product 
being priced at one penny less than 
£1. per album. 

The Birch Group has acquired Vox 
Sound Equipment Ltd. at a price 
understood to exceed £100,000. The 
new company will be called Vox 
Sound Ltd., and new directors are 


Michael Birch and John Payne, re- 
spectively chairman and financial 
director of the Birch Group, which 
trades in ophthalmic products, elec- 
tronic equipment and micro-film sys- 
tems. Former Vox managing director 
R. A. Hill will now act as a market- 
ing consultant to the company. Vox 
is continuing production of amplifica- 
tion equipment, guitars, and elec- 
tronic organs at its Erith plant with 
no staff redundancies. 

Mews Music, the publishing outfit 
run by songwriting duo Bill Martin 
and Phil Coulter, has landed its first 
movie soundtrack score following a 
deal initiated at MIDEM. The film is 
“The Battle of Neretva”, based on 
an episode during the wartime strug- 
gle between Yugoslav resistance 
fighters and the German Army, and 
the soundtrack charter is Nikica Ka- 
lodera. The movie, being handled 
through Paramount, stars Orson 
Welles, Yul Brynner, Curt Juergens, 
Terence Stamp, Sylvia Koscina, Hardy 
Kruger, Horst Buchholz, and is ex- 
pected to get its first British screen- 
ing during March or April. Franck 
Pourcel has already recorded one of 
its march themes, and the Dubliners 
are also in line for disk coverage on 
another part of the music. Coulter 
and Martin are writing English lyrics 
for the main theme of the movie, 
which has received active encourage- 
ment and support from Yugoslavia’s 
President Tito. 

Bernard Ness, Managing Director 
of RCA Ltd., has strengthened the 
record division in an internal realign- 
ment of responsibilities among its top 
management. Walter Sparksman be- 
comes concerned with export admin- 
istration, recorded tape operation, ad- 
vertising and release administration, 
sales, distribution, classical and pop 
programming. Ian Gillespie will be 
responsible for the programming and 
release schedule of the Victor label 
and promotion. Jeremy Watson in 
collaboration with Gillespie and 
Sparksman will be responsible for 
the operation of the record division 
to Bernard Ness. Ness said “The 
record division has achieved consider- 
able impact in its first 6 months of 
fully independent operation and the 
new moves are designed to ensure 
the continued controlled growth of 
expansion in Britain with particular 
emphasis on the development of UK 
product.” Bob Angles will co-ordin- 
ate release of LP and single product 
in the Northern European region. 

Peter Barnes of Lupus Music de- 
lighted with the success of Sid Bar- 
rett albums “Madcap Laughs” and 
Ummagumma” on EMI’s Harvest 
label. Already contracted with Euro- 
pean publishers. Lupus started nego- 
tiations at the recent MIDEM for 
Japan, Australasia, Israel and Spain. 
Other groups with Lupus include 
Aynsley Dunbar, The Pretty Things 
and Tyrasaurus Rex. 

Harlequin disk retail chain boss 
Laurie Krieger has notched a notable 
first by being the only record dealer 
to date to advertise his shops in lights 
on the Swiss Center newscaster in 
London’s Leicester Square. He has 
signed a one-year pact worth £6,375 
for 40,000 spots which he will share 
with other companies including Apple, 
RCA and Pickwick International. Tom 
Jones is embarking on his first Brit- 
ish tour since the fall of 1968 next 
month. He will play two nights each 
in London, Manchester, Liverpool, 
Birmingham and Cardiff backed by 
an orchestra under the baton of his 
musical director Johnnie Spence. 
Comedian Jimmy Tarbuck is the only 
other artist named for the bill. Jones 
is currently completing work on two 
new albums and a single, and after 
his British dates is due in Puerto Rico 
for concerts before beginning another 
long American stint with two weeks 
at the Copacabana in New York. 

CBS Records held “half-term” sales 
conferences in London and York Feb- 
ruary 14th and 15th prior to launching 
the next stage of its Rock Machine 
campaign. Special projects manager 


NEW YORK — Gerry Bron of Bron 
Artistes Management Limited of Eng- 
land arrived in New York to discuss 
the forthcoming tour of the United 
Kingdom by Musicor recording star. 
Gene Pitney, as well as to finalize the 
singer’s recording session that took 
place on Sunday, Feb. 15 at EMI’s re- 
cording studios in London. Bron is a 
long-term associate of Pitney’s and has 
handled Gene’s U.K. bookings through- 
out his years of success in England. 
His new single is called “Street of 
Hope,” and initially will be available 
only in the U.K. 

Bron has also arranged for Pitney to 


Glyn Evans and A & R executives 
Derek Everett and David Howells 
showed the CBS sales force advertis- 
ing posters and point of sale aids de- 
vised under the banner of “Fill Your 
Head with Rock — The Sound of the 
Seventies” which are all part of the 
company’s large investment in the 
progressive music scene. 

Andy Wood, together with Peter 
Hurley have formed Hurleywood 
Productions and Hurleywood Music. A 
London office is to be set up within 
the next few weeks and first disk cut 
is “California” by The Reflections 
issued on Philips. Hurley has just 
returned from a New York visit and 
Andy Wood is currently visiting New 
York, Los Angeles, placing masters 
and seeking new talent. 

Quickies: Big Pimlico party to 
celebrate Edison Lighthouse’s chart 
topper “Love Grows” hosted by song- 
writers Barry Mason and Tony 
Macaulay and Bell prexy Larry Uttal 
and attended by EMI chairman Sir 
Joseph Lockwood, Dave Dee, Mike 
d’Abo, Samantha Jones, Bill Justis, 
publishers Freddy Bienstock, Paul 
Rich, Stuart Reid and Mrs. Aaron 
Schroeder, and BBC radio men Teddy 
Warrick, Ron Belchier, Ed Stewart 
and Tommy Vance . . . Wessex record- 
ing studios in which songwriter Les 


appear on a number of key TV shows 
during his tour of England, such as 
“The David Frost Show,” “The Joe 
Brown Show,” “Top of the Pops” and 
“The Simon Dee Show.” Pitney will 
perform the new single on each of these 
shows. The U.K. tour will include both 
night clubs and concerts and begins 
this week Feb. 22, continuing through 
mid-April. 

As a follow-up to his chart climber, 
“She Lets Her Hair Down (Early In 
The Morning),” Pitney’s new single 
for Musicor has just been released 
titled “All the Young Women,” written 
and produced by Paul Vance and Lee 
Pockriss. 


Reed has an interest planning major 
expansion and reorganization in May 
. . . Cufflinks, chart parading with 
“Tracy,” here for itinerary including 
Irish dates . . . Former managing 
director of Jewel Music, Maurice 
Clark rejoins Harry Goodman’s Blue 
Ribbon and Tridton Music com- 
panies . . . Caterina Valente current- 
ly playing season at London’s Talk of 
the Town night spot . . . New APK 
artiste-management company formed 
and Mark Murphy among artists 
signed . . . Bobby Hannah among 
team of British artists to go to the 
Knokke Festival in Belgium in July 
. . . Philips issue second release of 
Vertigo albums featuring Rod Stewart, 
Black Sabbath and Cressida. 

Songwriters Bill Martin and Phil 
Coulter, who penned the successful 
Eurovision winners, “Puppet on a 
String” and “Congratulations”, are 
delighted with their success of their 
own music publishing company Mews 
Music which was set up just a year 
ago. They are currently celebrating 
the success of “Thanks” which has 
proved a smash all over the continent 
for J. Vincent Edwards (CBS) and 
indications are that the number is 
moving well in the States where it is 
issued on the Date label. Alas the disk 
is not showing any signs of being 
chartbound in the U.K. “Thanks” also 
marked the writers’ entry into produc- 
tion through their M & C Enterprises. 


56 


Cash Box 8 February 28, 1970 


International News Report 


EM! increases LP, Tape Prices 


LONDON — EMI Records reports im- 
portant changes in its price structure 
and trading conditions, following the 
abolition of Resale Price Maintenance. 
Single prices remain the same but pop 
Albums rise by 2/6d to £1. 19. 11; Har- 
vest (Underground) label from £1. 19. 
6d. to £2. 5. 0; Classical albums from 
£2. 3. 9. to £2 . 5. 0. Tape Records (S^A 
ips mono-twin track and ips stereo- 
four track) go up from £2. 1.0. to £2. 
3. 6d. The 5% Return Allowance to 
dealers will disappear but a compen- 
sating extra discount will be given. 

E.M.I.’s Managing Director, Ken 
East, points out that the price in- 
creases are the first to take place 
since July 1963 and that even now they 


Draine/Leacock Set 
Spoken Word Hit 

TORONTO — George Taylor, presi- 
dent of Rodeo Records, reports solid 
national and international reaction to 
the release of Melbourne’s first spoken 
word album, “John Drainie Reads 
Stephen Leacock”. Nationally, pro- 
grammers, retailers, libraries and 
schools have ordered heavily on the 
set and international interest has corne 
from as far away as Russia. Leacock’s 
books have been good sellers in many 
countries of the world including 
Russia, the U.S., UK and Canada. 

John Drainie, now deceased, had 
become synonymous with the Leacock 
figure having portrayed the Canadian 
humorist on stage, radio and tele- 
vision. 

The recording is just part of the Lea- 
cock Centennial but has added much 
more attention to the project since the 
bowing of the album. Executive direc- 
tor of the Leacock Centennial Commit- 
tee is Stephen Franklin, who received 
much assistance from Drainie’ s wife, 
Claire, now Mrs. Nat Taylor, and her 
six children. Perhaps the biggest assist 
came from Canada’s top record retail- 
er, Sam Sniderman, who became fa- 
miliar with the project and suggested 
that Franklin contact Rodeo’s Taylor. 
It was only nine weeks after meeting 
Taylor and discussing the possible re- 
lease that the Drainie/Leacock record- 
ing became a reality. Taylor commis- 
sioned the firm of Groovyart (Toronto) 
for the album cover which recruited 
all their fordes to rush through the 
creative art to meet the very tight 
scheduling for release. 


European Trek For 
Foster & Bryant 

NASHVILLE — Monument Records 
president Fred Foster left Nashville 
Friday Feb. 13 for England and Ger- 
many, where he will visit with foreign 
representatives for the Monument rec- 
ord and publishing companies. 

He is being accompanied by song- 
writer Boudleaux Bryant, whose “All 
I Have To Do Is Dream” is currently 
a smash in England. The song, re- 
corded by Glen Campbell and Bobby 
Gentry, has now been released in the 
United States. Foster’s international 
music publishing companies represent 
the Bryant catalog throughout the 
world, exclusive of the United States. 

While in England 13-22, Foster will 
visit with Sr. Edward Lewis and W. W. 
Townsley of British Decca, Monu- 
ment’s United Kingdom representative 
He said he will also be in the market 
for locally produced masters and/or 
artists while in Europe. 

Foster will also meet with Peter 
Phillips of Combine Music Ltd. and 
the Keith Prowse Organization. 

Foster and Bryant will go to Ger- 
many on Feb. 23 through Feb. 28. 
While in Germany, Foster will visit 
with Rolff Budde of the Rolff Budde 
Organization, representatives for Mon- 
ument Musik Vertreib. Foster and 
Bryant will return to the United States 
on March 1. 


represent only a portion of the total 
increases which have taken place in 
manufacturing and distribution over 
the past six years. 


Disney's 'Jungle Book' 
Gets Sweden Diamond 

HOLLYWOOD — The Record Indus- 
try Association of Swedejn has awarded 
a diamond disk, signifying sales in 
excess of 100,000 copies, to Disneyland 
Records’ “The Jungle Book.” Disk is 
the first album to meet the diamond 
disk standard. 

Jimmy Johnson, president of the 
Disney Music and Record Companies, 
credits the phenomenal sales of the 
album in Sweden, as well as world- 
wide, to the popularity of “The Jungle 
Book” movie, the second largest gross- 
ing film ever produced by the Disney 
studio. Domestic sales of the album 
qualified it for an RIAA award in 1969. 



Jim Rado and Jerry Ragni were the 
guests of Inelco (representatives of 
RCA in Holland) and “Cinemanifest- 
atie Utrecht”. Rado and Ragni were 
present at the first showing of “Lions 
Love”, in which they do the leading 
parts. Before the film they received 
the Piet Beishuizen, director of the 
Dutch record business organization 
CCGC, the Edison 1969 (a very impor- 
tant Dutch award) for their progres- 
sive work in music, especially for 
their LP “Hair” (the original Broad- 
way Cast) . The day after, Rado and 
Ragni were given the opportunity to 
be present at the Dutch production of 
“Hair” and they were very enthu- 
siastic! After the show, Inelco’s Pierre 
Dam offered them the Gold Disk for 
25,000 LP’s sold of “Hair” (the Broad- 
way Cast) in Holland. They offered the 
Gold Disk to the Dutch production of 
“Hair” in appreciation of their per- 
formance. 


Cuff Links Abroad 

NEW YORK — Decca Record’s Cuff 
Links left last week (20) on a three 
week jaunt overseas to England, 
where their hit “Tracy” went top five 
on the MCA label, Italy and Germany. 
The group will be making personal 
and promo appearances. 

The Cuff Links have made the charts 
with back to back hits, “Tracy” and 
“When Julie Comes Around,” as well 
as their “Tracy” LP. Their latest sin- 
gle is “Run Sally Run.” 


The World Of Music 
Comes Together 
In Cash Box 


Canada Radio's 30% Content Ruling Is 
Greeted As A 'Day Of Much Rejoicing' 


TORONTO — Thursday Feb 12 at 
10:30 AM was a day for much rejoic- 
ing by those Canadians who have been 
fighting for more recognition of Can- 
adian talent on Canadian radio. Pierre 
Juneau, chairman of the Canadian 
Radio Television Commission (CRTC) 
dropped a bomb that could be felt 
from Victoria British Columbia 
through to St. John’s Newfoundland. 
Canadian AM radio will, by Nov. of 
1971, be programming 30% Canadian 
content, and this means in all fields 
of endeavor. Although the door has 
been slightly opened for objectors to 
file their reasons why this shouldn’t 
be law at the April 15 session of the 
CRTC. Broadcasters however, should 
be prepared to be operational with 15% 
Canadian content by Nov. of this year. 
This leaves very little doubt that the 
CRTC expects any dissenters among 
its broadcasters. 

The Canadian Talent Library, a non- 
profit making organization, which has 
been underwriting recording sessions 
for many years, was very pleased 
with the pending regulation. Its presi- 
dent Lyman Potts has been a leader in 
the fight for more recognition of Can- 
adian middle of the road programming 
for years. CTL’s anchor station CFRB 
already programs 17% Canadian con- 
tent and still holds down the No. 1 

IMC To Cut Acts 
ForDist. By EMI 


LOS ANGELES - 
has concluded an 


IMC Productions 
agreement with 


EMI for record distribution in Europe 
for its artists, many of whom will be 
released on IMC’s own Hobbit Records. 

The first product EMI will probably 
release on the Continent will introduce 
Rockin Foo, reports IMC executive 
Lenny Poncher, who concluded the 
negotiations in London over the New 
Years period. 

Under terms of the six figure, three- 
year deal, IMC will provide EMI with 
eight albums and 12 singles per year, 
with EMI able to place the material 
on its parent EMI line or on the new 
Harvest operation, according to Pon- 
cher. 

Other Acts 

In addition to Rockin Foo, led by 
drummer Les Brown Jr. — who is also 
an IMC producer— the local production 
company owned by Poncher and Bill 
Loeb, will also offer product from 
Plain Jane a new pop quartet, Randy 
Holden, formerly with Blue Cheer, 
Sapphire Thinkers, a new pop quintet, 
the Smith Brothers, Eddie Cano, An- 
thony Newley, Ann Howard, Jerry 
Cook, Frankie Randall and Neely 
Plumb’s Funky Fiddles. 

John Miller, who heads IMC’s Lon- 
don office, will work with Ron White 
at EMI in coordinating releases and 
arranging promotions. IMC Produc- 
tions, in business less than one year, 
has placed product domestically on 
its Hobbit line and on GRT Records, 
which handles its distribution. 

Poncher is presently seeking li- 
censees in other parts of the world. 
EMI has the right of first refusal on 
anything the company develops here, 
Poncher said, and can only offer an 
artist to another company after EMI 
has turned down the second product 
by that artist. 

Of this core of artists destined for 
EMI release, several have not yet 
found American labels homes, like 
the Smith Brothers, a six-piece rock- 
jazz flavored band, Ann Howard, Jerry 
Cook and Frankie Randall. Plain Jane 
and the Sapphire Thinkers have both 
just been released on Hobbit. 

IMC’s London office has just signed 
up four British producer-artists, the 
first of which is working on a project 
to record 15th century renaissance 
music with a rock rhythm section. 
Miller, in turn, has just produced a 
new act. Saffron, which Hobbit will 
introduce in the States. 


position by a big margin and has for 
many years. The occasion was so mo- 
mentous that Gordon Sinclair, con- 
troversial newscaster and showbiz 
reporter, for the first time in the his- 
tory of his “Showbiz With Sinclair”, 
interviewed “live” a broadcast figure, 
W.C.T. Crann, president of CFRB- 
CKFM, who expressed much delight 
with the 30% suggestion of Canadian 
content. 

On the other hand, the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation, the govern- 
ment owned radio network, exercised 
somewhat of a snobbish approach to 
the content ruling on its AM radio net- 
work show “Radio Free Friday” (8 to 
10 PM). Hosts Maggie Morris and 
Peter Gzowski, the latter being editor 
of Maclean’s, which is or was Canada’s 
only National magazine, allowed 
CKLG Vancouver radio personality 
Roy Hennessy, who is also chairman 
of the Maple Leaf System, and Stan 
Kless, noted Canadian record produc- 
er, to have a go at each other. Many 
points were scored by both Hennessy 
and Klees but because of unnecessary 
moderator interference from Gzowski, 
follow-ups were not allowed which 
made their remarks valid only to those 
in the industry. The “Friday” crew, 
showing excellent form in innuendo 
patter, followed this rather expensive 
hook-up of Klees and Hennessy, by 
airing, with much amusement “Bud 
The Spud” by Stompin’ Tom Connors. 
What Gzowski and Morris failed to 
research was the actual popularity of 
Connors and in particular his Domin- 
ion disking of “Bud The Spud”. This 
single has been chalking up good sales 
and chart action for several weeks and 
has shown top appeal for country buy- 
ers, particularly those from the At- 
lantic Provinces. Country however, is 
not an area of listening where the CBC 
have shown any interest, which is 
somewhat disappointing in that 73% of 
Canadian radio stations program a 
good percentage of country, much of 
it Canadian country. 

With respect to Canadian classical 
recordings, many broadcasters have 
sounded the death knell for their pro- 
grams that rely only on classical 
works. Columbia, Capitol, RCA and 
London have a sizeable catalog (when 
put all together) of Canadian classical 
works, but not nearly enough to allow 
radio stations to meet the 30% Canad- 
ian content demand. London, who in 
conjunction with the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corporation have shown fore- 
sight in releasing a medium priced 
session classical album by Maureen 
Forrester, contralto with John Newark 
at the piano. Miss Forrester sings the 
“Four Serious Songs” of Brahms and 
the “Five Wesendonck-Leider” by 
Wagner — which, according to Juneau, 
constitutes Canadian content. This 
also presents another picture and a 
possible storehouse of Canadian clas- 
sical recordings. The CBC radio net- 
work has, for several years, been 
broadcasting the Tuesday evening 
concerts of the Toronto Symphony 
Orchestra. The last six years has been 
of exceptional sound quality. A record 
company could conceivably approach 
the CB(^ with an eye to sharing the 
cost of payment to the A F of M (Mu- 
sicians Union) and these many hours 
of excellent tapings could be made 
available, in disc form, to radio sta- 
tions and to the public. By the same 
token, CFTO-TV, each year, video’s 
a Massey Hall performance by the 
Toronto Symphony Orchestra, which 
receives excellent reviews, but has 
never been released on disc — another 
avenue to explore. 

Therefore there is very little room 
for valid argument at the April 14 
hearing of the CRTC. It is for the rec- 
ord industry and privately owned 
CFTO-TV and publicly owned CBC to 
merely make available the great 
amount of Canadian content they al- 
ready recorded or have ready to re- 
cord. 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


57 



CMhlo* France 


Georges Meyerstein, head of Philips, 
gave a party last Thursday for the 
Aphrodite’s Child the “wonder group” 
of France . . . Three French girl singers 
are recording cover versions of the hit- 
tune “I’ll Never Fall In Love Again”: 
they are Isabelle de Funes. Virginia 
Vee and Liliane Saint Pierre. 

Sacha Distel has covered, in French, 
“Raindrops Keep Falling On My 
Head . . Annie Cordy has joined the 
CBS Label as well as Zizi Jeanmaire 
who is enjoying big success with her 
new show at the Casino de Paris . . . 
CBS has also signed the Italian CGD 
catalogue previously with Festival . . . 
A national committee for a Berlioz 
monument has been formed. Its ob- 
jective: to build a monument worthy 
of Berlioz’ greatness. The French 
government has given full support to 
this committee. 

Polydor has signed with Steve Row- 
land’s Production (Rowland was the 
producer of Dave Dee Dozy . . . and 
Family Dogg) . . . Polydor France has 
recorded top Italian names in French: 
Bobby Solo, a Ricordi artist, Berti, a 
Polydor artist. Polydor is also releas- 
ing a single by Dik-Dik: “Primavera. 
Primavera” now topping the charts in 
Italy. They also have recorded Karina 
(No. 1 Spanish singer) in French . . . 

Michel Legrand will soon have his 
show on French TV, starring Barbra 
Streisand, Gene Kelly, Petula Clark, 
and Yves Montand . . . Eddie Adams’ 
album “The Best of France,” an in- 
strumental album of 13 songs composed 
by top French writers and composers, 
will be backed up by the French Broad- 
casting Organization ORTF . . . Europe 
No. 1 (independent radio station) 
scored a very big success with a con- 
test they launched to promote their 
radio-station. Nearly 2,000,000 people 
answered to this contest . . . Latest 
US releases in France include: singles 
by Lou Christie and Joe Simon and 
LPs by Ronnie Hawkins, The Doors, 
Diana Ross and Supremes . . . 

Jean-Louis Ginibre, editor of “Lui” 
magazine has informed us of the death 
of Jack Lewerke’s wife. Jack Lewerke 
is President of Vault. Back from the 
last MIDEM Jack Lewerke and his wife 
stayed at the Hilton Hotel, where his 
wife died suddenly . . . 


A new manager has been named to 
head the Tutti publishing company: 
Jean Jacques Tilche. Tilche entered 
the Philips organization 10 years ago 
and discovered such top French stars 
as Claude Francois. Since September 
1966, he has been production manager 
at Philips and concentrated, more par- 
ticularly, on Paul Mauriat. He signed 
Rika Zarai to Philips helping thus to 
sell over a million copies of “Casat- 
chok.” He is still A&R man for Esther 
Ofarim in France, he has now formed 
his own team at Tutti’s: Suzie Hally- 
day, Pierre Hebrard (Editions Conti- 
nental) , Harry d’Arc Auermaan (in- 
ternational) , Michele Leger (promo- 
tion) and Daniel Vergnes (administra- 
tion.) 

Continental Editions have secured 
the Belgian entry for the Eurovision 
song contest. Cecile Valerie is now 
singing in French “Sundance Kid” 
from the soundtrack of “Butch Cas- 
sidy ”. David Alexandre Winter is re- 
leasing a French version of an Italian 
song, “Una Spina, Una Rosa,” also 
with Tutti: “Rain” Jose Feliciano’s 
hit song was given to a new singer 
Cesar (Philips) . Brigitte Bardot is also 
singing Tutti’s material with “Mon 
leopard et moi.” Francoise Hardy has 
recorded “Magic Horse,” “Stranger 
Shadow” and “Song of Winter.” As 
producer, Jean Jacques Tilche is 
launching two new girls: Rejane and 
Vincenza both released through Phil- 
ips. Also a New Orleans group: les 
Lutetiens. 

magazine has recently published the 
results of a popularity poll compiled 
through letters of their readers. The 
results were as follows: Best Singer: 
Robert Plant (from Led Zeppelin) 
followed by Mick dagger, Paul Mc- 
Cartney and Bob Dylan. Best Singer 
(female) : Janis Joplin, Grace Slick 
and Aretba Franklin. Best Group: The 
Beatles, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin. 
Best Song Writers: Lennon/McCartney, 
Jagger/Richards, John Mayall. Best 
Single: “Oh Well” by Fleetwood Mac, 
“Honky Tonk” by The Rolling Stones, 
“Living In The Past” by Jethro Tull. 
“Best Album: “Ummagumma” by 
Pink Floyd, “Abbey Road” by The 
Beatles. Best Film: “Monterey Pop,” 
“More,” “Easy Rider.” 


Garner Product To Polydor 

Assignment of Enroll Garner prod- 
uct, by Octave Records, has been 
made in France to Polydor Records. 
The French diskery acquires exclu- 
sive rights to Garner’s UP IN ER- 
ROLL’S ROOM album. They also will 
continue to sell the Garner product 
they formerly acquired through MGM. 

The French rights also will include 
French speaking affiliates of Polydor 
in North Africa. 

Garner is preparing for a concert 
tour of Europe in April and May of 
this year. 


LEONARD G. REID 

LYRIC WRITER, A.S.C.A.P 
SONGS BY LEONARD G. REID 
ANDTHECASSETTS 

TRAIN TO GLORY 

AND 

GET DOWN UPON 
YOUR KNEES 

NOW RELEASED ON THE CASSETT 
LABEL RECORD NO. 691104 


AND COMING SOON 

MY LITTLE 
BOOM-A-RANG 

BY LEONARDO. REID 
PUBLISHER-WOOMERA MUSIC 
OF AUSTRALIA 


; NEW UNPUBLISHED SONGS 

AVAILABLE AT P.O. BOX 1448 N. 
HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA 


Ember's Kruger Talks 
Deals In U.S. Journey 

NEW YORK — Jeff Kruger, president 
of Ember Records, an international 
combine of music publishing compan- 
ies, and Hillbrow Productions Limited, 
a motion picture company, is in the 
United States for a trip that will cover 
negotiations on all phases of his 
operation. 

The tour will include trips to Tor- 
onto to take part in the launching of 
Ember Records in Canada through 
Transworld and to Jamaica where he 
will huddle with Leslie Kong, produc- 
er of Ember artist Desmond Dekker, 

While in the United States, Kruger 
will go to Hollywood for talks on “Head 
of State,” a big budget film planned 
as Hillbrow’s first major release in 
1970. Kruger has set Peter Hunt, who 
directed the new James Bond film, 
“On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” as 
director. 

Kruger heads one of the largest 
independent music publishing con- 
glomerates in the world. His music 
pubberies include Sparta Florida 
Limited, Editions Musicales Catalogue 
(jointly with Eddie Barclay) , Inter- 
nation Music of Italy (IMI), Kenwood 
Music Inc. (BMI) and Hillbrow Music 
Inc. (ASCAP) — the latter two U.S. 
based. Kruger publishes works by 
The Moody Blues, Foundations, rep- 
resents Glen Campbell’s publishing 
outside the United States and Can- 
ada, Norman Newell, John Barry 
and Hal Shaper. 

In the United States, Ember is dis- 
tributed by Buddah Records. 



SUMMIT TALKS IN PARIS were fully successful when the CBS Internationa] 
Publishers met. Gathered around the conference table are: (bottom, 1. to r.) 
Gunnar Bergstrom (Sweden), Sol Rabinowitz (USA), Deke Arlon (UK), Phillipe 
Boutet (France) and Ettore Carrera .(Italy) . (Top, 1. to r.) Martin Clark (UK), 
Harvey Schein (USA), Neil Anderson (USA), Peter de Rougemont (France). 
Bernd Simon (Germany), Vittorio Somalvico (Italy), Dag Haeggqvist (Sweden) 
and Nick Demey (France) . 


CmriMtiwi I tal y 


This week the industry is looking to- 
wards Sanreme contest, which re- 
mains the most important display for 
the Italian music business. This year 
the Festival will be held nearly one 
month later than the previous edition 
and that is to allow the full exploitation 
of “Canzonissima" songs and to avoid 
the coincidence with MIDEM. 

We already knew the 26 songs that, 
divided into two nights, will run for 
the victory, but a list of singers has 
not yet been released. Adriano Celen- 
tano will present a song referred to 
Italian “hot” autumn: “Chi Non 
Lavora Non Fa L’Amore” (something 
like: “If You Don’t Work, You’ll Not 
Be Allowed To Make Love”). Adri- 
ano’s partner will be his wife Clau- 
dia Mori. If Morandi takes part, which 
is still pending, it will be the first time 
that Di Bari’s “La Prima Cosa Bella” 
(“The First Beautiful Thing”). At this 
moment the situation appears as fol- 
lows: a) First night (25th February) 

La Spada Nel Cuore — Number One 


— Patty Pravo & Little Tony 

Ahi Ahi Ragazzo — RCA-Italian — 
Rita Pavone & Valeria Mongardini 
Romantico Blues — Suvini Zerboni 

— Gigliola Cinquetti & Bobby Solo 
L’Eternita’ — April Music — Cama- 

leonti & Ornella Vanoni 
Chi Non Lavora Non Fa L’Amore 

— Clan — Adriano Celentano & Clau- 
dia Mori 

L’Addio — RI.FI Music — Michele 
& Lucia Rizzi 

Occhi A Mandorla — filer — Rossano 
& Dori Ghezzi 

Canzone Blue — Universale — Tony 
Renis & Sergio Leonardi 
Serenata — Pegaso — Tony Del 
Monaco & Claudio Villa 
Tipitipiti — Arion-Esedra — Orietta 
Berti & Mario Tessuto 
Nevicava A Roma — Kansas — 
Renato Rascel & Pio 
Taxi — Ariston — Anna Identici & 
Antoine 

Che Effetto Mi Fa — Curci — Pino 
Donaggio & Sandy Shaw 


Italy's Best Sellers 


This Last 
Week Week 
1 1 

2 2 

3 5 

4 3 

5 4 

6 6 

7 7 

8 — 


Ma Chi Se Ne Importa (RCA) /Gianni Morandi (RCA) 

Se Bruciasse La Citta’ (Sugarmusc) /Massimo Ranieri (CGD) 
Venus/The Shocking Blue (Jeker) 

Come Hai Fatto (RCA) / Domenico Modugno (RCA) 

Questo Folle Sentimento (Number One) /Formula Tre (Num- 
ber One) 

Mi Ritorni In Mente (Number One) / Lucio Battisti (Ricordi) 
Mezzanotte D’Amore/ A1 Bano (EMI Italiana) 

Going Out Of My Head/ Frank Sinatra (Reprise) 


France's Best Setters 


1 It’s Five O’clock Aphrodites Child — Philips (Jason music) 

2 Billy Le Bordelais Joe Dassin — CBS (Bagatelle) 

3 Venus Shocking Blue — Disc’ AZ (Tremplin) 

4 Ceux Que L’ Amour A Blesse Johnny Hallyday — Philips (Suzelle) 

5 Seme Symphonic Ekseption — Philips (N C) 

6 Wight Is Wight Michel Delpech — Barclay (Tilt Music) 

7 Dans La Maison Vide Michel Polnareff — Disc’ AZ (Meridian) 

8 II Etait Une Fois Dans L’ouest E. Morricone — RCA (Chappell) 

9 Adieu Jolie Candy Jean Francois Michael — Vogue (Baboo) 

10 Une Petite Larme M’a Trahie Claude Francois — Philips (Ed. Barclay) 

11 I Am A Man Chicago — CBS 

12 Et Apres Adamo — Pathe (Pathe Marconi) 

13 Concerto Pour Une Voix Saint Preux — Disc’ AZ (Fantasia) 

14 Fortunate Son C. Clearwater Revival — Musidisc (Criterion) 

15 L’Hotesse De L’air Jacques Dutronc — Vogue (Alpha) 

16 Tu Veux Tu Veux Pas Zanini — Riviera (Pathe Marconi) 

17 Come Together The Beatles — Apple (Tournier) 

18 Oncle Jo Sheila — Philips (Carrere Plante) 

19 Je T’aime Moi Non Plus Jane Birkin — Disc’ AZ (Transcontinentals) 

20 Laisse Moi T’aimer Mike Brant — CBS (Tournier) 


58 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


Germany 


GoshBox Belgium 


From the 28th till 30th of March 
(Easter) a big pop and blues festival 
will be arranged in Hamburg. For 
these three days, more than 15,000 vis- 
itors for the shows are expected, be- 
cause the following groups were en- 
gaged: Free, Alexis Korner. Ashton, 
Gardner and Dyke Greatest Show On 
^ The Earth, Steamhammer, Hardin & 
York, Killing Floor, The Nice, Chick- 
1 : 1 , en Shack and Brian Auger Trinity. 

On Feb. 22, Vicki, most interesting 

- young talent singer of Phonogram Ton, 

- will fly to Japan for a 20-day-tour. 

- Edition Montana, Munich, will start 
a big promotion action in Germany for 
J. Vincent Edwards. After his hit 
"Thank” it is sure that he will be 

ul internationally promoted quickly. 

■ ) Reggae is a new teenager-sound 
pe from England, which will be released 
;) in the near future on Hansa by the 
i|' original Trinidad band Bamboos Of 
nj Jamaica with the titles: "Reggae 
Man” and “Jet Set.” Producer is 
Joachim Heider. The first German 
Reggae hit will be brought out on 
Ariola, sung by Rex Gildo with the 
title: "Love A Little Bit.” Producer 
is Thomas Meisel. Peter Meisels 
firms Intro and Hansa makes big 
promotion for this new rhythm. 

Peer music publishers communicated 
that good deals were made with the 
American success titles “Tracy” by 
The Cuff Links and "Ruby, Don’t Take 
Your Love To Town” by Kenny 
Rogers & The First Edition. Actually 
new publications, which also have great 
li hit chances, are “Cowboy Convention” 

0 by Ohio Express and "Sign On The 

1 Dotted Line” by Graham Bonny. 

Sugar, Sugar” by the Archies is, 
e with 5 million sold, one of the most 
1 - bought world-hits of the year 1969. 

In Germany this record reached until 
e now a number of more than 500,000 
copies. Furthermore, Teldec an- 

0 nounced that the bestsellers on the 
single sector are: Elvis Presley 

y “Don't Cry, Daddy,” Archies “Jingle, 
Jangle,” Manuela “Wenn Du liebst,” 
j Elvis Presley “Suspicious Minds” and 
Marmalade “Reflections Of My Life." 
j And the bestsellers by the LP’s are 
“Hair,” Ten Years After “Ssssh,” 
Elvis Presley “From Memphis To 
Las Vegas,” Rolling Stones “Let It 

1 Bleed,” “Anatevka,” Fleetwood Mac 
with “Then Play On” and Tom Jones 

) “Live In Las Vegas.” 

On August 29, Robert Stolz will cele- 
brate his 90th birthday in an open 
arrangement of the Sender Freies 


Berlin in the “Berliner Philharmonie.” 

On April 13, Gilbert Becaud starts 
to his tournee through Germany, 
which he had to cancel in the last 
year because of illness. The organi- 
zer registered with surprise that most 
of the tickets for the concerts are still 
in hands of the buyers. 

Udo Juergens will hand over to the 
President of the Federal Republic 
Heinemann, a check for 2 million DM 
($540,000) for the “Altershilfe” (old 
age relief) and the “Muttergenesung- 
swerk” (maternity home). This is 
the net profit of one million sold LP’s 
of “Stunde der Stars” (Hour of the 
Stars) . In September, Udo Juergens 
will start a 14 day tour through Argen- 
tina and Brasil. With TV appearances 
he will do pre-promo for his South 
America tour in 1971. In December, 
1970 Udo will go for five weeks to 
South Africa, where two concerts are 
planned daily. 

Shirley Bassey had in the first mid- 
night show on the "Bal Pare” in Mu- 
nich a fantastic success and much 
publicity. Show regisseur Dieter 
Finnern made a personality show 
with her, which will be telecast on 
German TV on Feb. 25. At the same 
time, her new LP on Liberty/UA will 
be released. The Swedish hit singer 
Siw Malmquist is still the most re- 
quested Metronome star in Germany. 
She was engaged for five popular TV 
shows and her new LP “Today” 
reached in only one week more than 
10,000 copies. 

In March Fleetwood Mac. only 
bluesband with recent single success, 
will come to Germany in the follow- 
ing towns: Hannover, Berlin, Ham- 
burg, Dusseldorf, Munich, Frankfurt, 
Nurnberg and Stuttgart. 

Anna Moffo, one of the most famous 
and requested opera, film and TV 
stars of the world, negotiate with 
Ariola boss Monti Lueftner. Until 
now she was under contract by Tel- 
dec/Decca. The discussions included 
besides record projects the mediums 
film and TV. 

The winners of the “Lowe (lion)- 
award” of the hit parade of radio 
Luxemburg for the first half year 
1969 are now known. Ricky Shayne 
will get for his record “Es wird ein 
Bettler zum Koenig” a golden award 
Andy Kim for "Baby I Love You” and 
Michael Holm for “Mendocino” a sil- 
ver and the Equals for “Viva Bobby 
Joe” a bronze lion. 



140 LOOKED INTO THE 70’s at the third annual Phillips Phonographic Indus- 
tries International Convention at the Rai Congress Centre in Amsterdam. 140 
delegates from 22 countries attended the two-week conference that took a long 
look at the aspects of the music business, including direct marketing, rack mer- 
chandising, music publishing, musicassettes, and of course popular and class- 
ical repertoire. Pictured are: (top, 1 . to r.) Joop Buinick, Pirn Zalsman and 
Jan van Houten — all directors on the PPI board of management in Baarn, 
Holland. Immediately behind them are Jack Haslinghuis (Phonogram, Nether- 
lands), Jorge Krupnik (Phonogram de Panama), Werner Hamburger (Nor- 
disk Polyphon, Denmark) and Dr. Werner Vogelsang (Phonogram, W. Ger- 
many). Bottom photo: (1. to r.) Frenchman Georges Meuerstein-Maigret 
(heaa of the publishing division of the PPI/Deutsche Grammophon group), 
Joop va)i der "Velden (managing director) and Coen Solleveld (president of the 
gr^np from the Netherlands) . 


Polygram’s Jean Vallee is the Bel- 
gian representative at this year’s Euro- 
vision Songfestival which will be taking 
place in Amsterdam on March 21. The 
Walloon singer will perform his own 
composition “Viens I’Oublier.” Bar- 
clay’s Michel Delpech appeared in the 
TV-shows Feu Vert and Tienerklanken. 
From February 20th to 24th Mireille 
Mathieu performed in the Brussels 
Ancien Belgique. On February 28th 
Michel Polnareff will sing in the “La 
Grande Nuit” gala. Hans Kusters, 
promotion-manager of the Primavera 
publishing-company, recorded a sin- 
gle under the name of Januske D’Rop 
en de Leutgadommes. This Red-Bullet 
production is entitled “Bart Jansen/ 
Nonneke”. Inelco Belgium is still tops 
in the single market, for, on the RCA 
label, two Archies’ records are among 
the best sellers: “Sugar, Sugar” still 
going strong and the newcomer “Jin- 
gle Jangle” which is about to take the 
place of its predecessor. Also King 
Elvis hits the charts with the fast 
climbing “Don’t Cry Daddy/Rubber- 
neckin’”. 

Owing to the running of the “Mid- 
night Cowboy”-picture, the Nilsson 
treatment of “Everybody’s Talkin’” 
receives the best of response. Very 
important for the local market was 
the release of the first single of a 
popgroup well-known in the Antwerp 
area: Paul’s Collection with the hard- 
beat treatment of “Man/Music Is My 
Life”, having all hit potential ingre- 
dients for the international market. 
On the MCA-label, Inelco has reached 
its peak of success by making Murray 
Head’s "Superstar” a number 1 in a 
very short time. Indeed, after being 
on the number I spot in the BRT 2 
Hitgolf national top 10 — getting tremen- 
dous airspinning — it also climbed fast 
in the sales-charts and Belgium is 
proud to be the first country where 
“Superstar” reached the highest po- 
sition. The airing on television of a 
film-strip with the same title must 
have launched it now to one of the 
highest sales figures. 

Much is expected from the first re- 
lease of a more than interesting 
Brussels popgroup Kleptomania with 
“Kept Woman/Out Of A Nightmare”. 
Kleptomania are also booked to appear 


on the next Pop-Eye TV-show of 
March 4th. In the LP-field, Elvis is 
still “the king” because most of his 
LP’s are reaching peak-sales and 
especially the double album “Live at 
Las Vegas”. Since the “Elvis N.B.C.- 
TV Special” was seen on television 
(Sunday-night February 15) it is to be 
expected that— if possible— Elvis’ sales 
still will increase, keeping up the rep- 
utation of Belgium being the most 
Elvis-buying country in Europe. CBS 
re-released “Bread and Butter” by 
The Newbeats (on Hickory) . The 
Johnny Cash-June Carter recording of 
“If I Were a Carpenter” was released 
too. Gramophone reports that “Sere- 
nade” by the Wallace Collection is 
selling strongly and probably will be- 
come a number 1. 

Australian-born Maggie Britton, 
who lives in England now, performed 
in the Hey TV-show on February 19th. 
She sang “Ruben James” (on Liberty) . 
Gramophone is extremely active in 
the Tamla Motown-field. Re-released 
was the LP “Soul Session” by Junior 
Walker and The All Stars, the most 
popular discotheque-group in Belgium. 
Further Tamla Motown releases in- 
clude “Best of Gladys Knight and The 
Pips”, “On Broadway” (Diana Ross 
and The Supremes and The Tempta- 
tions) and the single “How Can I For- 
get (Marvin Gaye). With a big pro- 
motion were released: “There’s a 
better day a cornin’” (Crazy Elephant) , 
“Mornin’ Mornin’” (Bobby Golds- 
boro), “Books and Films” (Tbe For- 
tunes), “Temma Harbour” (Mary 
Hopkin), “How the Web was Woven” 
(Jackie Lomax) and “Je t’aimerai 
jusqu’a la fin du monde” (Gilbert 
Becaud). The company also released 
all Creedence Clearwater Revival 
LP’s. “Who’ll Stop the Rain” will 
certainly become the group's first 
number 1 single-hit in Belgium. This 
is due to the hard-working Gramo- 
phone-team. With “Raindrops Keep 
Falling On My Head” by B. J. Thomas 
the Scepter label had a good start and 
a first hit. The Atlantic show with 
Arthur Conley, Joe Tex and Sam & 
Dave turned out to be a big success. 
Record-sales were much influenced. 
We, in Europe, are waiting for a big 
Tamla Motown tour. 


Belgium's Best Sellers 


This Last 
Week Week 
1 1 

2 9 

3 8 

4 13 

5 — 

6 2 

7 16 

8 11 

9 3 

10 — 


Thanks (J. Vincent Edwards — CBS) . 

Don’t Cry Daddy (Elvis Presley — RCA) . 
Mighty Joe (Shocking Blue — Pink Elephant) . 
Jingo-lo-ba (Santana — CBS) . 

Superstar (Murray Head — MCA) . 
Liefdeverdriet (Will Tura — Palette) . 
Mackintosh (The Pebbles — Barclay) . 

Marian (The Cats — Imperial) . 

Without Love (Tom Jones — Decca) . 

Jingle Jangle (The Archies — RCA) . 


Germany's Best Sellers 


This Two 
Week Weeks 
1 1 

2 2 

3 10 

4 — 

5 8 

6 5 

7 3 

8 — 

9 — 

10 — 


Ago 

*Dein schoenstes Geschenk — Roy Black — Polydor — Gerig 
Down On The Corner — Creedence Clearwater Revival — 
Bellaphon-Arends 

*Mendocino — Michael Holm — Ariola — Altus/Global 
Gruezi wohl, Frau Stirnimaa — Minstrels — Columbia — Ed. 
Montana 

Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye — The Stream — Fontana — 
Altus/Global 

Sugar, Sugar — The Archies — RCA Victor — Intro 
(Call Me) Number One — The Tremeloes — CBS — MdW 
Mademoiselle Ninette — The Soulfull Dynamicy — Philips — 
Sikorski 

Rub A Dub Dub — Equals — President — Kassner 
Jingle, Jangle — The Archies — RCA Victor — Intro 


*Original German Copyright 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


59 


CmihBoac MCXECO 


Argentina 


George Albert, our CASH BOX presi- 
dent and publisher arrived in Mexico 
City last Sunday for a three day stay. 
It was a real pleasure to have the boss 
down here. 

The French delegation to take part 
in the 11 Festival de la Cancion Lati- 
na en el Mundo includes CBS’s Pilar 
Thomas and Michel Fugain with Cara- 
velli as conductor. Another CBS per- 
sonality to be in the Festival Sergio 
Dennis from Argentina. 

Sir Joseph Flawith Lockwood. EMI's 
Chairman of the Board, will arrive in 
Mexico City on March 20th to start a 
Latin America tour. While in Mexico 
City he will be Discos Capitol de Mex- 
ico’s guest. 

RCA released a package of LPs this 
week from its brand new side line Audio 
Fidelity. The package includes; “Mu- 
sic To Moog By" with Gerhon-Kings- 
ley: “Thoroughly Modern" with Lester 
Lanin; “Dream" and “Music by Ces- 
sana" with Otto Cessana; “More Today 
Than Yesterday” with Barbara 
McNair: “Impala Syndrom" and “A 
Brand New Bag ” with Ron Richardello 
and “The Other Side" with Lalo Scha- 
frin. 

Charming songstress Magda Franco, 
just back from The Festival de la Can- 


cion Latinoamericana in Miami, is do- 
ing a big promotional campaign. She 
has already been booked for the year. 
Magda will do TV, night club and the- 
atre. 

“Venus” with The Shocking Blue, 
on Polydor, is one of the hits of the 
moment. 

Quite a success was Luis Eca and 
La Familia Sagrada’s night club debut 
at El Dorado, Hotel Camino Real; the 
same goes for their TV Show. Luis 
Eca former Tamba 4 pianist, is head- 
ing a 12 piece ensemble, all of them 
talented. Discos RVV released, simul- 
taneously, Luis Eca and La Familia 
Sagrada’s debut LPs with such out- 
standing tracks as “Paris Tropical,” 
“Ye-Mele," “Sequestro" and “Se 
Voce Pensa’’. 

These are the 10 CBS best sellers of 
the week:-l.- “Yo Te Amo, Yo Tamp- 
oco" with Ray Conniff; 2. -“Mi Viejo" 
with Piero: 3.-“Tu Camino y Nel Mio" 
with Vicente Fernandez: 4. -“Bom- 
boro" with Sonora Santanera; 
5.-“Frente a Una Copa de Vino” with 
Luisito Rey; 6. -“El Silencio es Oro" 
with The Tremoloes; 7. -“Amor de 
Pobre" with Hnas. Huerta: 8.-“Libro 
Abierto" with Gerardo Reyes; 9. -“El 
Bandolero" with Las Jilguerillas and 
"Ebrio de Amor" with Juan Luis. 


Italian chanter Bobby Solo has been 
the visitor of the week in Buenos 
Aires. Contracted for appearances at 
Carnival dance parties, he also took 
part in TV programs, like Channel 
13’s highly rated “Sotano Beat," on 
Friday evening. CBS, who releases 
Bobby’s records, reported an immedi- 
ate increase in his sales as a result 
of the visit. 

Phonogram is out with the first LP 
by Bill Deal and the Rhondels, who 
smashed the charts last December 
and reached top positions. The diskery 
expects this album to sell strongly, 
mainly in the teen market. On the 
soft music side there is a new LP by 
Argentine musician and composer 
Lalo Schifrin, currently living in the 
States, with US and Latin American 
standards. 

Jorge Cesar Esperon of Prodisa 
infos about the simultaneous launch- 
ing of the 20th Century Fox sound- 
track of “Hello Dolly," as album, 
cassette and eight track cartridge. 
The diskery has been experimenting 
in these fields and has found the cas- 
sette and cartridge markets very 
attractive for the type of music in 
its catalog. Prodisa is also releasing 
three Command LP’s with electronic 
music recorded with the already world 
famous Moog synthetyser. 

Music Hall’s Calvo infos about the 
arrival of local instrumental & vocal 
combo Sound and Co., that have re- 
turned from a several months — long 
tour of Latin American countries and 
have a strong recording schedule for 
the near future. The group is cur- 
rently appearing on TV, through 
Channel 7, and will start another 
trek next April, including this time 
Miami, New York and Puerto Rico, 
with an eventual extension to Madrid 
and Paris. Although primarily de- 
voted to beat music. The Sound and 
Co., have been trying evergreens very 


successfully, and are a strong export- 
able item in the Music Hall catalog, 
according to Calvo. 

Trova’s Radoszkynski infos about 
the launching of an LP tagged “Soul 
& Beat 70’’ which will feature the 
latest singles released by Scepter in 
the States. There is also a new LP by 
Dionne Warwick, whose sales are in- 
creasing strongly in this market. On 
the local side, there is an album, the 
fourth one, by the Portena Jazz Band, 
a local group playing hot jazz. New 
Orleans style. 

Mauricio Brenner of Fermata infos 
about the shooting of the film “Un 
Elefante Color Illusion,” by eight- 
year-old triplets Las Triliizas de Oro, 
whose records have been selling very 
well all through 1969. The girls are 
preparing another single and the LP 
with the songs from this film will 
also be released soon. 

RCA has had many strong Euro- 
pean hits in the past and it seems that 
time has arrived once more for the 
smashes from Italy: two recordings, 
Gianni Morandi’s “Belinda” and 
Jimmy Fontana’s “Cuanto the Amo” 
are now riding high in the charts and 
mark the return of Morandi and Fon- 
tana to the high selling rank. The 
Fontana waxing is coupled with a local 
tune, penned by Vico Berti and Coco 
Avila, and both are published by 
Relay. 

Odeon has released a Compact 33 
with four tangos sung by TV actress 
Julia Sandoval, who, last year, be- 
came notable through TV’er “El 
Boton,” where the cast usually sings 
and dances the local top hits, usually 
changing the rhythm . . . and some- 
times the notes. Sandoval recorded 
standards like “Nada” and “Anoche” 
and the recording is intended also for 
other markets where tango music has 
strong sales. 


Mexico's Best Sellers 


This Last 
Week Week 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


Sugar, Sugar — The Archies — RCA 
*La Nave Del Olvido — Jose Jose — RCA 
Green River — Creedence Clearwater — Liberty 
*Tiritando — Cesar Costa — Capitol 
*Tu Que Me Das — Carlos Lico — Capitol 
Venus — Shocking Blue — Polydor 
*Paloma Negra — Cesar Costa — Capitol 
Come Together — Beatles — Apple 
I’ve Been Hurt — Bill Deal & The Rhondells — Polydor 
Mi Viejo — Piero — CBS 


*Local 


Argentina's Best Seilers 



CAPITOL IN CENTRAL AMERICA - 

Brown Meggs, left, vice president of 
Capitol Records, and Augusto Diaz- 
Duran, general manager. Discos de 
Centroamerica, Guatemala City, 
Guatemala, shake hands on a licensee 
agreement between Capitol and the 
Guatemala-based record manufac- 
turer. Discos de Centroamerica will 
manufacture and distribute Capitol 
product in the Central America com- 
mon market, which is comprised of 
Costa Rica, Honduras, El Salvador, 
Nicaragua and Guatemala. Capitol 
recently named other licensees in 
both the Carribbean and South Ameri- 
ca. 


In another development, Charles 



NEW TO THE FAMILY — Tomas 
Munoz (right) , manager of CBS 
International’s newly-formed Spanish 
subsidiary. Discos CBS, located in 
Madrid, discusses new release plans 
with Peter de Rougemont (left), vice- 
president European operations at CBS 
International. 


Phipps, Capitol Records international 
marketing manager, was in Panama, 
South America, recently to finalize a 
licensing agreement with Discos 
Istmenos, and Rodrigo de Diego, gen- 
eral manager, sign the long term con- 
tract between Capitol and the South 
American-based record manufacturer. 
Capitol in recent months has entered 
into several licensing agreements with 
companies throughout South and Cen- 
tral America as well as the Caribbean. 


This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 

2 2 

3 6 

4 11 

5 3 

6 9 

7 7 

8 8 

9 4 

10 5 

11 — 

12 15 

13 10 

14 12 

15 — 

16 19 

17 18 

18 14 

19 16 


Es Preferible (Melograf) Peret, Romeo (Disc Jockey) ; Bobby 
Capone (RCA Safari) (CBS) 

*Zapatos Rotos (Melograf) Naufragos (CBS) 

Belinda (Relay) Gianni Morandi (RCA) 

Fiesta Joan Manuel Serrat (Odeon) 

*Trigal (Ansa) Sandro (CBS) 

Cuanto Te Amo (Relay) Jimmy Fontana (RCA) ; Johnny Hally- 
day (Philips) 

*La Nave Del Olvido (Ramos) Mirtha Perez (Music Hall); Luis 
Grille, Hugo Marcel (RCA); Greco (EMI) 

*Siempre Fuimos Companeros (Melograf) Donald (RCA) 

I’ve Been Hurt (Melograf) Bill Deal & Rhondels (Polydor) ; Trio 
Galleta (Odeon) : Klan (RCA) 

*Balada Para Un Loco (Melograf) Amelita Baltar (CBS) ; Roberto 
Goyeneche (RCA); Walkers (Music Hall) 

*Te Llamo Para Despedirme (Melograf) Sergio Denis (CBS) 
Compasion (Relay) Dyango (RCA) 

Tu Nombre Me Sabe A Hierba (Clanort) Joan Manuel Serrat 
(Odeon); Elio Roca (Polydor) 

*Cebando Mate (Relay) Tormenta (RCA) 

Looky Looky Pintura Fresca (Disc Jockey) 

*Chiquillada (Odeon) Leonardo Favio (CBS); Jose Carbajal 
(Odeon) ; Cesar Isella (Philips) 

Toda Mia La Ciudad Sabu (Music Hall) 

*Bailando En Una Pata (Clanort) Juan y Juan (RCA) 

*Chiquilina (Relay) Los Iracundos (RCA) 

* Local 


Argentina's Top Ten LP's 


1 1 Sotano Beat Selection (RCA) 

2 2 Joan Manuel Serrat Joan Manuel Serrat (Odeon) 

3 3 Abbey Road Beatles (Odeon) 

4 4 Sandro Sandro (CBS) 

5 6 Muddy River Johnny Rivers (Liberty — EMI) 

6 5 Muchacho De Oro Palito Ortega (RCA) 

7 7 Almendra Almendra (RCA) 

8 9 Es Preferible Peret (Disc Jockey) 

9 10 Pa Que Dentre Jose Larralde (RCA) 

10 — Saxo Enamorado Fausto Papetti (Music Hall) 


60 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 






GashBox 


t Hf- V\U i i i ^ i 

'■^ 1 ^ 


COIN MACHINE NEWS 


EDITORIAL 


The Other Fella’s Shoes 


You can never appreciate heat until you’ve experi- 
enced cold. In the same vein, no coin machine fac- 
tory, or any of its dealers, can do a 100% job unless it 
assumes the attitudes of the operator in every sales 
situation. Simply, the people on the selling end should 
never forget that the operator must not only pay for 
the machine, but live with it, try to make a buck with 
it, take care of it when it breaks down and hope to get 
a fair exchange for it at trade-in time. 

The integrity of the jukebox and games factories 
and distributors can be summed up in one thought: 
“sell unto others as I would have sold unto me, if I 
were an operator.” We’re not intimating that operators 
are being pushed to buy shoddy goods by any repu- 
table dealer, just reminding everyone that there is a 
logical limit to the number of new machines an oper- 
ator can use every year. The good dealer should al- 
ways know his regular customers’ needs and fill, never 
overload, them. 

There’s no secret that the prophets of gloom are 
roaming about the coin machine industry today. Re- 
ports of soft export sales, bad domestic sales and even 
poor collections in key metropolitan areas are coming 
in at an alarming rate. Trouble is, these complaints 
have a strange way of mushrooming way out of pro- 
portion, slowing down the industry’s prosperity 
even more. And at the heart of all this dour talk is 
probably the most abused cliche of all time — “tight 
money.” 

Hey, let’s be honest. Most operators make a good 
buck. Even what we like to call your smaller route 
owners — guys with 60 machines out there — are 
prospering pretty well. And lest anyone forget, this 
has always been a “depression business”, meaning 
that when money really gets tight and the man on 
the street has less to spend having fun, he usually 
ends up playing the jukebox and the amusement 
machine because it’s cheap. No, we can’t quite believe 
that “tight money” is adversely affecting collections. 
Might be TV, going back to the movies, or something 
else, but it’s certainly not because Americans are too 
poor to play the machines. Just might be another 
reason which, reluctantly, we might refer to as “tight 
operator.” 

Think about it, operators. Put yourselves in the dis- 
tributor’s shoes, the factory’s shoes. It’s not too hard 
to figure what they have to do to make a living and 
it certainly won’t help to draw back the purse strings 
on new equipment purchases in the mistaken belief 
that money not spent on a needed machine is money 
earned. Ever consider that old, dirty and mal-func- 
tioning games, pool tables, music boxes turn a lot 
of customers away? People just don’t like dropping 
money into junky looking equipment, so when an 
operator cuts the number of new games he normally 
buys in half he’s cutting the merchandising abilities 
of the stuff on location in half at the same time. 


III. Ops Fight Revision 

CHICAGO — At the recent Board of 
Directors meeting (5) in the Holiday 
Inn East (Springfield, 111.) ICMOA 
adopted the resolution to combat 
pending legislation before the Senate 
which would, among other things, 
increase the current $8.00 juke box 
royalty fee. A letter writing campaign 
is currently in progress and members 
are being strongly urged to voice 
their disapproval of any such legisla- 
tion, via letters, wires, calls, etc, to 
their Senators, 

Also discussed at length was the 
personnel problem facing many oper- 
ators in the Illinois area. ICMOA’s 
executive director Fred Gain will 
personally look into this problem and 
try to develop a program to stimulate 
interest in seeking employment in the 
industry. 

At the close of the meeting the 
Board paid tribute to the late Bob 
Lindeloff, who passed away recently, 
for his many services to the coin ma- 
chine industry and to the association. 

The annual meeting is tentatively 
slated for sometime in September at 
Stauffers in St. Louis. 


Meetin’ At The Mark 



Scene of MOA board of directors 
meeting. The directors of Music Oper- 
ators of America will gather in San 
Francisco’s famed Hotel Mark Hopkins 
for their mid year meeting on Thurs- 
day, Friday and Saturday, March 12, 13 
and 14. President Lou Ptacek will call 
the three-day meeting to order with 
a luncheon for board members and 
guests on Thursday. This will be fol- 
lowed by a status report on copyright 
legislation by MOA legal counsel 
Nicholas E. Allen. There will be a 
reception that evening for members 
and non-members in the San Francisco 
area. A heavy agenda of association 
business faces the MOA board, in- 
cluding further bylaws revisions, re- 
view of membership categories, elec- 
tion of 1970 committees, planning the 
1970 Exposition. 


Enrollment Now Open 
For New MOA Policy; 
No Physical Required 



LES MONTOOTH 


CHICAGO — MOA Insurance com- 
mittee chairman Les Montooth has 
announced an open enrollment period 
from February 15 to April 1. During 
this 45-day period members may sign 
up for the new group insurance plan 
without a medical examination. 

The new plan, underwritten by the 
Valley Forge Life Insurance Company, 
provides coverage, depending on age, 
up to $45,000.00. 

Executive vice president Fred 
Granger noted that the “recently an- 
nounced group insurance program, 
currently available to all MOA mem- 
bers and their employees, is simply 
an extension of overall MOA policy, 
which is to provide more and better 
services to the membership," 

He said that while in some instances 
MOA members may already have 
such insurance, it is possible to super- 
impose this coverage on their present 
insurance, or to adopt the MOA plan 
as their primary group insurance, 
without fear of unfavorable tax con- 
sequences. 

MOA president A. L. Ptacek, Jr., 
has complimented the insurance com- 
mittee on this new group insurance 
plan as a big step forward in MOA 
services. He also pointed out that “an 
individual on his own cannot buy in- 
surance. Most of our members are 
too small to buy group insurance but 
more significantly, even if they could, 
such insurance would still not be as 
economical as the group life insur- 
ance which may now be purchased 
through the MOA.” 

Detailed information on MOA's new 
group life insurance was mailed to 
all members in the past few days. 


The operator gets mad when machine prices go up, 
that’s only natural. But when he decides to cut back 
drastically on his purchases, it’s not helping anyone, 
especially the earning power of his route. Best reac- 
tion to a price increase is the obvious one — boost 
the play-pricing on the machines on location. Pass 
the grief onto the public who can afford it, not back 
to the dealer and the factory who need every sale they 
can get. 

You know, this is a small industry. Everyone should 
try to climb into the other fellow’s shoes once in 
awhile and he just might understand his situation 
a little better. 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


61 



SEGA In “Record Biz” with Juke Tune 


Bartholomew Picked Wurlitzer L A. Chief 


TOKYO — A unique specialty record 
designed to "open and close” locations 
has been produced on the SEGA label 
for distribution to the company's 
thousands of locations throughout 
Japan. 

One side of the record is designed 
to politely announce closing time and 
features an instrumental version of 
"Auld Lang Syne.” The accompanying 
narration by "MISS SEGA" thanks 
patrons for coming, suggests they 
return soon for more good fellowship 
and good music on the Rock-Ola" and 
ends by wishing everyone a pleasant 
"sayonara.” 

On the reverse side is the "Navy 
March, " a rousing song frequently 
used in Japan to signal the start of 
business. Plans call for periodically 
releasing different renditions of the 
record. 

The impetus for the new location aid 
came from SEGA Service Department 
chief Shinichiro (Slim) Ogasawara. 
Slim had noted that many Japanese 
cafe owners faced a problem when it 
came to ushering patrons out the door 
at closing time. Because some “fare- 
well-type” records were not effec- 
tive by themselves with what Slim 


calls the "hard-core lingerers,” he 
drafted the tactfully worded narra- 
tion. 

Slim's juke box version of “reveille 
and taps” has been very well received 
by location owners. 



Slim and his jukebox novelty single. 


NORTH TONAWANDA — Anthony J. 
Bartholomew will assume new duties 
and responsibilities as manager of 
the Wurlitzer Los Angeles factory 
branch according to Roy F. Waite- 
made, vice president and manager of 
the Wurlitzer North Tonawanda Divi- 
sion. Bartholomew had previously 
served as manager of the company's 
factory branch operation in San Fran- 
cisco since 1965. 

The position Bartholomew will as- 
sume was recently vacated by Clay- 
ton Ballard who was transferred to 
the North Tonawanda Division. Bal- 
lard now occupies the newly-created 
position of manager-market research 
and sales training. 

In his new post, Bartholomew will 
head a staff responsible for the sales, 
service and financing arrangements 
for Wurlitzer coin-phonographs and 
remote equipment in Southern Cali- 
fornia. His headquarters will be at 
the Wurlitzer Los Angeles factory 
branch located at 2920 West Pico 
Boulevard. This is an area of business 
places associated with the various 
phases of the coin-operated industry. 
The Wurlitzer factory branch is con- 
venient for those music route operators 




ANTHONY BARTHOLOMEW 


who are in the habit of replenishing 
their record stock during the course of 
a business day. 

When announcing the appointment, 
Waltemade commented: “I am de- 
lighted to make this appointment. Mr. 
Bartholomew has spent most of his 
adult business career as a music op- 
erator in the San Diego area. He is 
completely familiar and conversant 
with the phonograph business and 
can, therefore, better serve the Wur- 
litzer customers of the Southern Cali- 
fornia market.” 

Bartholomew, a native of David 
City, Nebraska, joined the Wurlitzer 
Company in 1963 as a salesman in the 
Los Angeles factory branch. Sub- 
sequently, in 1965, he was promoted 
to the post of manager of the San 
Francisco factory branch operation, 
located at 154 South Van Ness Street. 

Bartholomew and his wife, Barbara, 
will relocate their home in the Los 
Angeles area where he will assume 
his new duties April 1st. 


Abe Lipsky Dies 

FORT LEE, N. J. — Abe Lipsky, a 
veteran of over 20 years in the coin 
machine distributing and jobbing busi- 
ness, died suddenly and unexpectedly 
in his home here Sunday morning, 
Feb. 15th, from a heart attack. He 
was 57. 

Lipsky first entered the jukebox and 
games business in early 1948 when he 
joined the Young Distributing Co., 
Wurlitzer’s Ohio dealer. Abe worked 
Young’s New York City routes and 
jobbed equipment. In 1958, he formed 
the All-Type Vending Corporation in 
Philadelphia, distributing such lines 
as Wurlitzer, Valley and Keeney. He 
returned to New York in 1960, formed 
the Libra Distributing Co., changing 
the name to Lipsky Distributors a 
year later. The firm, with offices at 
44th and Tenth Ave., became one of 
New York’s most popular centers for 
reconditioned music, games and vend- 
ing equipment and since 1968 had 
served as distributor for Mutoscope, 
NSM (thru A.C.A. Sales and Service) 
and a number of other lines. 

Abe had never owned his own oper- 
ating company, as have most of his 
dealer colleagues. He often said he 
didn't care to be in competition with 
his customers. 

A most affable and knowledgable 
man, Abe literally started many of 
today’s New York area operators in 
business with their first machines 
and financing help. His popularity 
was demonstrated in the United Jewish 
Appeal’s selection of him for its 1966 
Guest of Honor, Coin Machine Division. 
He was deeply respected by everyone 
in the local trade. 

Abe is survived by his wife Bernice, 
son Burton and daughter Madelynn. 
Services were conducted at the River- 
side Chapel in Manhattan Tuesday 
Feb. 17th, followed by interment at a 
New Jersey cemetery. An extremely 
large number of local tradesmen at- 
tended the services (see Eastern 
Flashes) . 


Galahad 


tXTWlBMi,. 


SUSPENSE 

ACTION 


PLAY APPEAL 

act\on 





^04tCi4. 

MO TO 500 

Bonus-^2(M!^3^'®4^°''^^00 or highest lit 
each time any of 4 Ton Rnii advances 

Is hit when fiti ^ ‘’''3 Targets 


FREE BALL GATE 

Post drops to F®ee Ball^Gatnocated 

Button Is hit opening Free Ban u 

fco“e?30o"n'way back to shooter tip. 


4 Top Rollovers score lO or 100 when lityY 
3 Targets score 10 or 100 when lit^ 

2 Side Out Lanes score 100 
★“Mystery” lightingthrough 0-9 unit 

GALAHAD is turning in record collections in 
the 2-p!ayer class. Get your share. 


See.yVufl^triburor or write BAllY MANUFACTURING CORPORATION • 2640 BELA^ONT AVENUE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60618, U.S.A. 


62 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


Scheer Names Berke 
Midway Sales Mgr. 

CHICAGO — Ross Scheer, director of 
marketing, with Bally Manufacturing 
Corporation, has announced the ap- 
pointment of Larry Berke as sales 
manager for Midway Manufacturing. 
“Berke’s twenty three years experi- 
ence in the coin machine field has 
given him unusual insight in solving 
any problems confronting operators 
and distributors,” Scheer said. “He 
will be responsible for the sales of 
Midway products and will continue 
to contact Midway’s distributors from 
his office at the Schiller Park, Illinois, 
factory,” he added. 


Allied Picks G. Lipkin 
For National Sales Chief 

MIAMI — Robert Braun, president of 
Allied Leisure Industries, has announc- 
ed the appointment of Gene Lipkin to 
the post of national sales manager for 
his amusement machine manufactur- 
ing concern. Lipkin assumed the re- 
sponsibility for the position Feb. 16th. 

Pleased with his selection, Braun ad- 
vised that both he and Lipkin will be- 
gin a road tour of the firm’s domestic 
distributors to introduce the new sales 
manager and to reveal information on 
several pending machine releases. 
What has been described as “a total 
revolution in the arcade machine,” 
will hit the market within sixty days, 
Braun disclosed. 

Lipkin had been a member of the 
Myron Sugerman International sales 
force prior to his appointment to Al- 
lied. Working under Sugerman sales 
veterans Barry Feinblatt and Hans 
VanDendop proved a most valuable 
education into the business of selling 
coin equipment, Lipkin said. 

“I look forward to our road trip and 
meeting Allied’s network of fine dis- 
tributors,” the new sales manager 
added. 


Appointments In Canada 



A. BOUCHARD 


MONTREAL — Alouette Amusement 
Que. Ltee. has announced the appoint- 
ment of A. Bouchard as assistant man- 
ager, in charge of complete recondi- 
tioning facilities at the company’s new 
premises, 8505 Delmeade Road Town 
of Mount Royal. Bouchard has 20 years 
of technical and electronic experience 
in the coin operated amusement in- 
dustry. Well known in the trade, he 
is a veteran of 10 years within com- 
pany and prior to this appointment 
has been service representative. 

Gerry O’Reilly, president of Alouette 
Amusement also announced the ap- 
pointment of Hector Levert as sales 
representative. Levert has 30 years 
experience in all aspects of the coin 
operated phonograph, and amusement 
industry. Levert looks forward to visit- 
ing his many friends and acquaint- 
ances throughout the county in the 
near future, O’Reilly stated. 


Broad Agenda Sparks Lively COIN Meet 


OMAHA — Approximately 40 opera- 
tors and wives were on hand for the 
February 8 general membership meet- 
ing of COIN, held at the Prom Town 
House in Omaha, Nebraska. 

Keynote speaker was MOA president 
Lou Ptacek, who spoke at length on 
public relations and its application to 
the coin machine industry, elaborating 
on MOA’s current running Phase H 
p. r. program. 

Ed Zorinsky of H. Z. Vending and 
Sales in Omaha, spoke on the recently 
passed Bill 1360, which taxes all coin 
operated amusement machines in the 
state of Nebraska, exclusive of phono- 
graphs, cigarette and candy machines, 
etc. Under this bill operators must pay 
$100.00 per year, plus $10.00 for each 
machine on location. 

Former MOA prexy Howard Ellis 
discussed the pending copyright legis- 
lation which threatens to impose ad- 
ditional royalty fees upon juke box 
operators. Many associations, includ- 
ing COIN, have instituted letter-writing 
campaigns urging operators to voice 
their disapproval of said legislation 
in letters to their senators. 

COIN prexy Ed Kort talked about 
“foosball”, which he described as a 


rather “controversial subject”. He 
has a few on location right now and 
feels that they could prove profitable 
with the proper promotion. Being a 
very promotion minded individual 
he intends to plug “foosball ” to the 
hilt, keep a close watch on collections 
and make periodic reports on his 
progress. 

During the general membership 
meeting which followed the speeches, 
various committee reports were given 
and several pertinent subjects were 
discussed. Among them the personnel 
problem facing many operators in the 
state of Nebraska and the shortage of 
qualified, trained mechanics. As a par- 
tial solution Ed Kort suggested the 
employment of female help which he 
has done in his own business. Only 
drawback, as was pointed out, is the 
lack of mechanical knowledge on the 
part of most women. 

Bill Findlay, Rock-Ola Mfg. Corp. 
field engineer, was on hand for the 
meeting and conducted a service ses- 
sion on the “442” and “443” model 
phonographs, which attracted the en- 
tire assemblage. 

At the close of the business sessions 
a cocktail party and banquet was held 
for operators, wives and guests. 


IMPORTANT 

NOTICE 

For the very best values in 
flippers, bingos, guns, base- 
ball games and arcade 
equipment, always check 
our weekly ad in the classi- 
fied advertising section. 

NEW ORLEANS 
NOVELTY CO. 

(Famous for Used Games) 

1055 Dryades Street 
New Orleans. Louisiana 
529-7321 Cable: NONOVCO 




Empress 


105F Series 59" x 105" 
92F Series 52" x 92" 


Regent 


101F Series 56" x 101" 
91 F Series 52" x 92" 
86F Series 48" x 84" 


Service problems are what puts the 
grief in your life. All the time your table 
is out of service you’re losing money. 
That's why Fischer tables have been 
engineered to be as fool proof and trouble 
free as any table in service today. New 
condensed steel reinforced mechanism 
drawer, non resettable coin counter, 
security controlled cash box with metal 
housing, all help put cash in 
your side pocket. 

When it comes to building better billiard 
tables, Fischer doesn't fool around. 


Marquee or 

100F Series 56" x 101" 
90F Series 52" x 92" 



scher 



Fischer Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

Subsidiary of A. G. Spalding & Bros. Inc. 

Tipton, Missouri 65081 


rJESTOR 



Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


63 



on higher 


PROFITS 



S6GI)^nt6»pRises Lt6. 

P.O. BOX 63 TOKYO AIRPORT 


TOKYO 149 JAPAN Cable: Segaslar 


FOR SALE - FOR EXPORT 

Bally Slots $295 & up 

Mills Open Front, 

Like New $285 

Mills HiTop 125 

Jennings Galaxy 285 

UPRIGHTS 

Clover Belle 300 

Keeney Super Bonus 300 

Draw Belles 75 

Large Stock of Bally Bingos. 
Bally Parts for Export. 

Bally Distributing Company 

390 E. 6th St. P.O. Box 7457 
Reno, Nevada 89502 
(702) 323-6157 
1524 South Western Avenue 
Las Vegas, Nev. (702) 385-3632 



PRICEiMUNGE 



8ei 


HELICOPTER 

TRAINER 


$ 395 . 


$ 495 . 


Midway WHITE 
LIGHTNING GUN 
★ 

RECONDITIONED - LIKE NEW 
READY TO GO - READY TO USE 
Send For Complete Machine List 


Exclusive Rowe AMI Distributor 
Ea.Pa -S. Jersey-Del.-Md.-D.C. 

llflvm KHSen im: 


855 N. BROAD ST . PHIIA.. PA. 19123 
Phone • 215 CEnler 2-2900 


„ . .r. 

CadiBm LocatMon Programming Cuido 

WEEK'S TOP RECORD RELEASES FOR COIN PHONOGRAPHS 



Aduti Locations ^ 

Toon Locations ^ 



COME ON DOWN (2:47) 

WHO’S YOUR BABY? (2:49) 

DEAN MARTIN 

THE ARCHIES 

Down Home (2:51) Reprise 0893 

Senorita Rita (2:30) Kirshner 5003 



SOMETHING (3:18) 

UP THE LADDER TO THE ROOF (2:58) 

TONY BENNETT 

THESUPREMES 

Eleanor Rigby (3:40) Columbia 45109 

Bill, When Are You Coming Home (3:20) Motown 1162 



ODDS & ENDS (3:04) 

MIGHTY JOE (3:04) 

JOHNNY MATHIS 

THE SHOCKING BLUE 

For All We Know (2:58) Columbia 45104 

No Flip Info. Colossus 111 



SOMEDAY WE’LL BE TOGETHER (3:06) 

ME WITHOUT YOU 

BERT KAEMPFERT 

BILLY JOE ROYAL 

We Can Make It Girl (3:16) Decca 732647 

Mama’s Song (2:50) Columbia 4-45085 



APPLAUSE (1:44) 

ADD SOME MUSIC TO YOUR DAY (3:39) 

PEARL BAILEY 

THE BEACH BOYS 

When The World Was Young (2:51) Project Three 1376 

Susie Cincinnati (3:04) Reprise 0894 



ANGELINA (2:38) 

LOVE OR LET ME BE LONELY (3:14) 

JIMMY ROSELLI 

THE FRIENDS OF DISTINCTION 

I’m Coming Home, Los Angeles (3:14) United Artists 50624 

This Generation (3:23) RCA 0319 



( C&W ) 

C ) 



LOVE IS A SOMETIMES THING (3:01) 

MY BABY LOVES LOVIN’ (2:56) 

BILL ANDERSON 

JOE JEFFREY 

And I’m Still Missing You (2:23) Decca 32643 

The Chance Of Loving You (2:50) 



STAY THERE, TILL 1 GET THERE (2:17) 

CAN’T STOP (2:51) 

LYNN ANDERSON 

KOOL& THE GANG 

I’d Run A Mile To You (2:06) Columbia 4-45101 

Kool It (2:50) De-lite 525 



DARLING DAYS (2:58) 

TURN BACK THE HANDS OF TIME (2:35) 

BILLY WALKER 

TYRONE DAVIS 

Pretend You Don’t See Me (2:18) Monument 1189 

No Flip Info. Dakar 616 



AFTER THE PREACHER’S GONE (2:32) 

BABY-BABY DON’T STOP NOW (2:28) 

PEGGY SUE 

SAM & DAVE 

You Can’t Pull The Wool Over My Eyes (2:02) Decca 32640 

I’m Not An Indian Giver (2:32) Atlantic 2714 


check your local One Stop for availability of the listed recordings 


64 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 




New Zealand Ops Seek MOA Ties 


CHICAGO — Among the many items 
that will be discussed at the March 
MOA board of directors meeting in 
San Francisco’s famed Mark Hopkins 
Hotel is an inquiry Fred Granger re- 
ceived last week from the New Zea- 
land Music Operators Association. 
N.A. Assn, secretary H. P. Van Eeden 
was interested in the possibility of en- 
rolling his group in M.O.A. either on 
a group or individual basis, as mem- 
bers, after reading of MOA’s numer- 
ous services. Van Eeden expressed 
especial interest in the Public Rela- 
tions Campaign. 


“Our Organization has a member- 
ship of nineteen juke box, pooltable 
and other coin operated amusement 
machine operators and covers the 
whole of New Zealand. Although our 
members individually have been well 
established for some time, the Asso- 
ciation itself was not formed until the 
latter part of 1967 and is therefore 
still in its infancy stage. We feel there- 
fore that an exchange of ideas with a 
powerful and more experienced Asso- 
ciation like yours would be of great 
benefit to ourselves,” he wrote. 


Along NSM’s Service School Trail 



Recent service of service classes con- 
ducted in the Eastern U.S. by Cliff 
Stauffer of A.C.A. Sales and Service 
brought out operators and mechanics 
to learn workings of this music line. 
Above, Stauffer (left) holds forth at 
S&S Music in Toms River, N.J. 


Down to Falkland, N.C. and South- 
eastern Distributors classes. Cliff 
chats with operator S.P. Stancile on 
technical points of the Prestige 160 
juke. Southeastern handles NSM line 
in wide area of the South. 



Leonard Amusement Co., NSM’s 
Michigan area distributor with head- 
quarters in Adrian, Mich., was also 
scene of an NSM class. Shown above 
is Leonard service manager Hank 
Grey. 


At the Leonard Amusement session, 
left to right, are Hank Grey, Jerry 
Baker, firm principle Bud Leonard 
and Stauffer. 



Southeastern Distributors principles 
at their Norfolk, Va. office are Suge 
and Bernie Inge. 


Bud Leonard at his desk. Leonard 
Amusement is one of Michigan’s 
largest music and games operating 
companies. 



Randy Butler (right). Southeastern Again at Southeastern are (left to 
service manager, with Stauffer. right) Bill Hensley of the Norfolk 

office and Modern Music operator 
Merv Lonigan. 


CLEVELAND COIN INTERNATIONAL 
WELCOMES THE DAZZLING 70’s 

The best location in the nation for quality reconditioned 
equipment— parts and workmanship warranted— expert crating. 


Ohio's exclusive SEGA 
Distributor. Accepting or- 
ders for the fabulous SEGA 
‘Grand Prix’ 


Fantastic earner. 25it play. 
Five slightly used SEGA 
Periscopes. Write . Write 


Arcade Novelty 

Midway 1 million BC $450 

Midway Flying Saucer 395 

Midway Space Gun 350 

Midway Captain Kidd 325 

Midway Monster Gun 250 

Midway Dog Fight 475 

Midway White Lightning 495 

Midway Golden Arm 245 

Williams Spooks Gun 525 

Williams Phantom Gun 625 

SEGA Duck Hunt 

(fully converted) 450 

ChiCoin Safari 525 

ChiCoin Super Scope 345 


Pingames 

bally Safari 2-pl 350 

Bally Wiggler 4-pl 350 

Bally Rock Maker 4-pl 445 

Gottlieb Royal Guard 325 

Gottlieb Fun Land 325 

Gottlieb Paul Bunyan 2-pl ....395 

Gottlieb Domino 1-pl 375 

Williams Student Prince 

4-pl 445 

Williams Pit Stop 2-pl 450 

Williams Lady Luck 2-pl 375 

Williams Derby Day 2-pl 350 

Williams Hay Burner 2-pl 425 


Mr. Top Gun, outstanding 
arcade specialty $650.00 


Phonographs 

Rock-Ola 425 $475 

Rock-Ola 426 545 

Rock-Ola 429 Starlit 495 

Rock-Ola 433 Imperial 695 

Rock-Ola 437 Ultra 795 


Kiddie Rides 

All-Tech Indian Scout 345 

All-Tech Cross Country 

Racer 395 

All-Tech WhirlyBird 395 

Fisher Flipper 350 

Fisher Bat Mobile 495 


CLEVELAND COIN INTERNATIONAL 


2029 PROSPECT AVE. 


PHONE: (216) 861-6715 CABLE: CLECOIN 


CLEVELAND, OHIO 44115 


Ets. RENE PIERRE Automatic Coin Games Mfr. 

39 Ranchot, Jura, Erance 

FOOT-BALL 
DERBY 

Competition • Lux • Export 

NON-COIN MODELS ARE 
AVAILABLE FOR HOME SALE 



Exclusive representative 
for USA and Canada 

Call: (212) MU 9-0547 


CHARLES RAYMOND & CO., 
381 Park Ave. South 
New York, N. Y. 10016 


INC. 


SALESMAN 


A top flight Salesman is required in Great 
Britain to represent the unique Cameron Sol- 
id-State Stereophonic Phonograph in Britain. 

Applicants must be fully experienced in all 
aspects of the coin-operated music field. The 
position is a senior one, and will carry a good 
salary. Company car, and all the usual bene- 
fits associated with a large company. 


PLEASE APPLY IN WRIT- 
ING TO MR. J.L LANE, DIREC- 
TOR. AUTOMATIC COIN EQUIP- 
MENT (CARDIFF) LTD., ACE 
HOUSE, FERRY ROAD, CARD- 
IFF, WALES, GT. BRITAIN. 



SALESMAN 

WANTED 

To work territory for prominent 
East Coast distributing organiza- 
tion. Must be experienced with 
phonographs and amusement 
machines. Salary commensurate 
upon ability. Generous fringe 
benefits. Write 

Box 867 

c/o Cash Box 
1780 B’way, N.Y.C. 10019 


WORLD WIDE . YOUR ONE-STOP 

SUPERMARKET for MUSIC— VENDING — GAMES 


ARCADE 

HELICOPTER TRAINER $295 

Chicago Coin DRIVE MASTER 565 

Chicago Coin HOCKEY CHAMP 375 

All-Tech GOLDEN ARM 215 

Midway MONSTER GUN 150 

Williams FAST BALL BASEBALL 450 

SPECIAL! Allied UNSCRAMBLE (Like New) $295"! 


DISTRIBUTORS FOR; SEEBURG • UNITED • WILLIAMS 

TERMS: 1/3 Dep., Bal. Sight Draft or C.O.D. 

We carry the most complete line of Phonographs, Games, Arcade 
and Vending Equipment, Write for Complete List! 


WORLD WIDE distributors, 


2730 W. FULLERTON AVE,, CHICAGO, ILL. 60647 
(312) 384-2300 CABLE: GAM ES— CH ICAGO 



Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


65 






DAVIS REBUILT & RECONDITIONED 
PHONOGRAPHS- 


NEW LOW PRICES FOR SPRING LOCATIONS 


Seeburg 

Phonographs 

DS160 $395. 

LPC480 495. 

Electra 595. 

Fleetwood 695. 

SS160 795. 

Wurlitzer 

Phonographs 

2800 $395. 

3000 575. 

Wurlitzer 

Wallboxes 

5250 - 200 SEL $35. 



WORLD EXPORT 



738 ERIE BOULEVARD EAST 
SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 13210 
PHONE 475-1631 
AREA CODE 315 


^^ToTThe finest in Shuffles 
and Bowlers, insist on 


“United” 

Now Delivering 

EPSILON 



BANNER SPECIALTY CO. 

1213 N. 5th St. Phila., Pa. 215-236-5000 
1508 Fifth Ave. Pgh., Pa. 412-471-1373 
Exclusive Factory Authorized Distributor 
for Penna., New Jersey, Delaware 


A Full Line of 
Coin Operated 
Recreational 


mfrican 

SHUFFLEBOARO COMPANY 

210 PATERSON PLANK ROAD 
UNION city. A NEW JERSEY 


“The House That 
Quality Built” 


Proven Profit Maker! 



CHICAGO COIN’S 
Sensational 

SUPER 

CIRCUS 

RIFLE GALLERY 

• New, Unique Sound System 

• Double Depth Illusion 

• 10$ or 25$ Play 

ALSO IN PRODUCTION: 
SPEEDWAY 

MOON SHOT • ASTRONAUT 


CwiiRour Round The Route 


EASTERN FLASHES 



Abe Lipsky 


Seems everybody in the business 
was there to say goodbye. The weather 
was unseasonably warm on the way 
to Riverside Chappel last Tuesday 
but the atmosphere was a mixture of 
sadness and bewilderment. It was 
only the previous Saturday that Abe 
Lipsky was down at his shop on Tenth 
and 44th. Now he was dead. And the 
hundreds who turned out for the 
services, to nod their sympathies to 
Bernice Lipsky as she walked silently, 
and with quiet dignity out of the chap- 
pel to the waiting limousine, were 
visibly grieved in loosing a true 
friend. The trade had lost one of its 
best. “I didn't know he had a heart 
attack once before, " one said. “Can’t 
believe it,” answered another. “I 
heard she wants to keep the business 
going,” said a third. Many were to 
show up at their Fort Lee, N.J. home 
during the ensuing week of mourning 
to offer their personal help to the 
family. Johnny Bilotta came down 
from upstate to see Bernice. Needless 
to say, every dealership on the street 
was represented by its principles and 
all the big and small operators were 
there. Sam Morrison was there; Abe 
practically started him and his 
partner Steve in the business, after 
the war. A1 Miniaci, Billy Kohler, 
Gil Sonin, A1 Denver, George Holtz- 
man, Ben Chicofsky ... too many to 
mention. People came over from Jer- 
sey, from the Island, from Upstate. 
On the street after the service, groups 
of tradesmen chatted, recalling bits 
and pieces of Abe's life, remembering 
how he used to commute from Cherry 
Hill, N.J. to coinrow, remember 
when he worked out of Philly, remem- 
ber when he was guest of honor at 
the UJA and Newark, N.'V. Mayor 
EIzufon talked about rose bushes 
and the American economy for what 
must have been four hours, remem- 
ber? “Remember how fat he used 
to be?” one fellow said nostalgically. 
“He looked so well, especially after 
he lost all that weight. You never 
know, do you." Abe died in his sleep, 
that’s one good thing. Now it'll be 
tough to go down the street, at least 
for awhile, and pass by 44th and not 
see him leaning on the glass, arms 
folded, then waving at you as you 
come close. “What’s doin, Abe,” 
you’d ask. “Moving good, music boxes 
are going well, cigarettes okay, 
things are good. What do you hear?” 
Rest in peace, Abe. 


AROUND TOWN — Ward Johnson, 

Nutting Industries’ sales chief, into 
New York last Wed. on sales trip 
. . . Len Schneller of U. S. Billiards 
off on swing of the South, reports one 
of best month’s table sales for Febru- 
ary, and month’s got another week to 
go . . . A1 Simon back from Europe 
. . . Lou Wolberg of Runyon looking 
great after week’s Florida sunshine 
. . . Mickie Greenman down with 
the Flu few days last week. 


FROM PHILLY — It will be a special 
breakfast party at David Rosen, Inc., 
Philadelphia distributors, on the 
morning of Tuesday, March 17th. For 
that’s the day that Louis Grubow 


will be marking his half-century 
mark. And with the birthday greetings 
will come anniversary greetings be- 
cause at the same time, popular Louie 
— happy member of the Rosen ser- 
vice staff — will also be celebrating 
a quarter-of-a-century association 
with the Rosen company. When asked 
how he likes spending half of his life 
with the company, he said that he 
planned to spend his whole life with 
the Rosen firm. 


FAR EASTERN FLASH — The SEGA 
Rifle Team, represented by finalists 
Eiichi Yukawa of the Plant Depart- 
ment and Toshiaki Sato of the Parts 
& Warehouse Department, has won 
an award from the Tokyo Rifle As- 
sociation for their high-scoring point 
total in league competition. Admin- 
istration Department chief T. Taka- 
hata ascribes their “real-life” win to 
frequent practice on gun games made 
by Williams, Chicago Coin, Midway 
and SEGA. 


CALIFORNIA CLIPPINGS 

“MINI CYCLE” BRINGS MAXI PRO- 
FITS . . . Bob Portale of Portale Auto- 
matic Sales reports that just recently 
received Gottliebs new two player 
pin game “Mini Cycle’’, and he 
couldn’t be more pleased with the 
results that he has been getting with 
this new pinball. Bob also reports 
that everything is auto racing over 
there with “Speedway” continuing 
to burn up the tracks and breaking 
all records. More Rock-Ola's are still 
going strong with shipments of the 
442 and 443 just arriving . . . 

FROM ANCHORAGE — Leonard 
Hicks, field service representative 
for the Wurlitzer Company has been 
battling his way around the frozen, 
snow-bound country of the state to 
conduct two 2-day service schools 
in this northern city. Scene was the 
Captain Cook Hotel where classes 
were held from 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 
Nineteen service technicians and 
sales personnel were in attendance, 
having come all the way from such 
remote places as Fairbanks in the 
north to the remote southern island 
of Kodiak in the Gulf of Alaska. In- 
structor Hicks maintains the large 
turnout is ample proof of the en- 
thusiasm and interest shown in the 
Wurlitzer STATESMAN Phonograph. 
At the same time, smaller towns 
in Alaska, though being a bit remote, 
do not lack for communication none- 
theless. This is due largely to two 
principals of the Northwest Sales 
Company . . . Ron Pepple and Harold 
A. “Buzz” Heyer. Base of operation 
for the Northwest Sales Company is 
located at 3150 Elliott Avenue in 
Seattle, Washington. Ron is its presi- 
dent and manager; “Buzz” is backup 
man for this busy Wurlitzer phono- 
graph distributor of the northwest. 
At the two-day Wurlitzer-sponsored 
service school in Anchorage was the 
well-known Anchorage Amusement 
who had Vernon McMillan and John 
Know attend for them while Billiard 
Vending had Manuel Prentice; Ben- 
son Amusements sent Albert A. Car- 
ley and Action Vending sent Keith 
Copeland and Jim Trow. The town 
of fairbanks had a number of music 
route operators represented: Aurora 
Music sent Eugene Brazeau; Fair- 
banks Music sent Leonard McKinney 
and F. H. Christensen. From Kenai, 
Alaska came Jim Burnett, Vic Tyler 
and L. W. Peteet representing the 
Tyler Novelty Company. David A. 
Leavy of Clear, Alaska attended for 
Dale Services, Dick Benson of Ben- 
son Amusements was there from Pal- 
mer, Alaska and the National Vending 
Company sent R. B. Craig. “Buzz” 
Heyer from Northwest Sales in Seattle 
also attended the Wurlitzer-sponsored 
two-day service seminar in Anchor- 
age. 


66 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 



CgghBoac Round The Route 


CHICAGO CHATTER 


One of MOA’s most ambitious 
projects to date is the life insurance 
program currently being offered to the 
entire membership. The plan was ex- 
plained quite thoroughly in last week’s 
Cash Box. “We strongly feel,” said 
MOA’s Fred Granger, “that this insur- 
ance plan is one of the most important 
services yet developed by MOA and I 
urge members to take advantage of 
the open enrollment period from Feb. 
15 to April 1st.” Fred went on to 
explain the many additional benefits 
the plan offers, not the least of which 
is the coverage of up to $45,000 (or 
three times as much as the former 
MOA plan) and to stress the im- 
portance of enrolling as soon as 
possible. Members who take ad- 
vantage of the open enrollment period 
are not required to take a physical 
examination. Interested parties take 
heed . . . Chicago Dynamic Industries 
has a phenomenal item in its ‘Speed- 
way’ — and that’s no exaggeration. To 
quote Mort Secore, “we’re dropping 
behind on orders despite shipments of 
50 per day and there’s no let-up in 
sight.” Mort added that collection 
reports from all over the country have 
been fantastic. 

Among board members in 
attendance at the recent ICMOA meet- 
ing in Springfield (5) were prexy 
George Wooldridge, Les Montooth. 
Harry Shaffner, Orma Johnson Mohr. 
Gene Fiedler, Dwayne Kramzar. Bud 
Hashman, Chiek Henske, and exec- 
utive director Fred Gain. Association’s 
annual meeting will be held in Sep- 
tember . . . Lots of activity at the Wil- 
liams Electronics, Inc. factory — cen- 
tered of course on current biggies ‘Gay 
90’s’ and ‘Epsilon’. . . . Martin H. Cher- 
neff was appointed vice president of 
food services of the Business and 
Industry Group of Interstate United 
Corp., according to Lorron G. Caryl, 
president of the B&I Group. In a 
further announcement, by lUC’s Ralph 
Nolan, Allan Roessler was named 
personnel services manager of the 
Chicago-based firm . . . “Galahad” con- 
tinues to be a very big item out at 
Bally Mfg. Corp. Sales Dept, has been 
chalking up a very healthy score on 
this one . . . Two new members have 
joined the ranks of C.O.I.N. They are 
Clide Meredity of Ray’s Music in Neb- 
raska City and Anderson Music of 
North Platte. Both signed up at the 
association’s Feb. 8th meeting. 
C.O.I.N.’s prexy Ed Kort happily 
boasts a 100% membership gain since 
1968 . . . Nate Feinstein and Harold 
Schwartz of World Wide Distribs are 
pleased that the Seeburg factory is 
now delivering the ‘Apollo’ in greater 
quantity, enabling the distrib to begin 
filling the backlog of orders for the 
new model . . . Art Wood was at the 
world wide Chicago headquarters for a 
few days last week, attending sales 
meetings, following which he headed 
right back to the Springfield premises 
where some new office equipment was 
being installed . . . D. Gottlieb & Co. is 
enjoying much success with its current 
item ‘Mini Cycle’ . . . For a look-see at 
what local operators are favoring in 
the choice of new singles we called 
Gus Tartol of Singers One Stop. His list 
included the following: ‘Until It’s Time 
for You to Go’ by Neil Diamond on 
UNI, ‘Oh Me, Oh My’ by Lulu on Atco, 
‘All I Have to Do Is Dream’ by Bobbie 
Gentry and Glen Campbell on Capitol, 
‘Can’t Help Falling In Love’ by Al 
Martino on Capitol and ‘You Made Me 
So Very Happy' by Lou Rawls on 
Capitol. 

Learned from Fred Granger that the 
MOA “letter to your senator” cam- 
paign (re copyright legislation) is 
enjoying participation by anywhere 
from 25% to 30% of the membership, 
which is “good but by no means 
enough” says Fred. Some ops have 
already received replies from their 
senators, he advised. Those associa- 
tions known to be actively pushing 
their members to make their thoughts 


known to senators include: FAMA, 
ICMOA, KAMA, COIN, MONY, 
OREGON, M&V of S. Dak., MOV and 
West Virginia. 

MILWAUKEE MENTIONS 

Dick Mellon is extremely proud of 
the new building, constructed a few 
months back, which houses his Mellon 
Sales operation in Green Bay, Wis- 
consin. A real eye-catcher is the huge 
sign, occupying one complete side of 
the building, which pictures a 
phonograph, an amusement game and 
a pinball machine — all done by a 
professional artist! That’s taking real 
pride in your work! Hope to have a 
photo of the new premises for all to see 
. . . The Rock-Ola “443” compact model 
is proving a winner out at Empire in 
Menominee. Bob Rondeau says 
they’ve had to re-order twice already! 
The demand is that great! . . . Much 
activity at Pioneer Sales & Services. 
ChiCoin’s “Speedway" is selling up a 
storm, according to Joel Kleiman. and 
the distrib’s enjoying plenty of action 
on the Rowe MM4 phonograph and 
vending equipment . . . Kaye Stevens is 
headlining the current bill in the Lake 
Geneva Playboy Club . . . Russ Town- 
send of United Inc., reports a big run 
on used equipment of all types this 
past week. Operators have been 
buying everything in stock! United is 
also enjoying success with the recently 
acquired Vendo line of cigarette, 
candy and cold drink machines. The 
Wurlitzer “Statesman”, of course, con- 
tinues to create all sorts of excitement 
in the phono department! . . . John Jan- 
kowski of Radio Doctors points out 
once again the popularity of country & 
western records with operators. Two 
such items, “Husband Hunting” by Liz 
Anderson (RCA) and “Welfare 
Cadillac” by Guy Drake (Royal Amer- 
ican) are exceptionally big here. Also 
snaring operator attention are Top 40 
item “Love Grows Where My Rose- 
marie Goes” by Edison Lighthouse 
(Bell) and a pair of standards, 
“Ramona” b/w “Amapola” by Shay 
Torrent on the Sunny label. 

UPPER MID-WEST 

Walter Witt out of the hospital after 
having a hernia operation and taking 
it easy . . . Harry Adkins, United Ma- 
chine Co. also had a hernia operation 
the same week and is getting along 
just fine . . . Steve Lieberman and 
Harold Okinow and their wives spent 
a nice week at Aspen skiing . . . Jim 
Stolp in town over the week end and 
making the rounds Monday morning 
and buying equipment . . . Red Ken- 
nedy and Stan Baeder in town for a 
few days buying records and parts . . . 
Joe Durham in the cities for the day 
as was Lloyd Currie of the L. & 1. 
Co. Duluth . . . Dean Schroeder. Aber- 
deen, in the cities over the weekend 
and returning home Tuesday . . . 
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Sanford in town 
for the day buying records and parts 
. . . Ted Salveson Jr. and Jim Taylor. 
Huron, drove to the cities for the day 
and returned the same day . . . Mr. 
& Mrs. Fritz Eichinger, St. Paul are 
vacationing in Florida on their yacht 
. . . Ernie Erkilla in the cities for the 
day buying equipment . . . Herb Peter- 
son and his serviceman Cal. in town 
for the day buying records and parts 
. . . John McMahon, Eau Claire re- 
turned home last week after visiting 
his brother in Washington who is 
seriously ill . . . Earl Porter and his 
service man Kenny Mitchell, in the 
cities for a few days as Kenny was 
getting his eyes checked at the U. of 
M. hospital . . . Mr. & Mrs. Norton 
Lieberman returned Friday 13th. from 
a seven week vacation in California, 
Las Vegas and Mexico . . . Bud and 
Clair Nitteberg, Castlewood in town 
on one of their very rare visits, buying 
equipment . . . Mr. & Mrs. Sam Sigel. 
left this week for a vacation in San 
Francisco. Sam heads the credit dep't. 
at Lieberman Music Co. . . The Ice 
Capades open at the St. Paul Auditori- 
um. 


SCORE SOME POINTS WITH 
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*C0IN- 

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AND SOUND 
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^EASILY 

INSTALLED 

^RECORDS 

BASKETS, 

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BASKETBALL 

MACHINE 


WRITE OR CALL COLLECT FOR FREE DETAILS 


ALADDIN AMUSEMENT PRODUCTS 


P.O. Box 40800 Fort Worth, Texas 

(817) 293-2660 76140 


New 

FOOSBALLS 

Now 

Available 


DISTRIBUTOR 

1 

INQUIRIES INVITED 

1 1 n EMPIRE INTERNATIONAL 

1 ISO SOUTH SAMGAMON STREET / CHICAGO. ILL 60607 

Eg PHONE (3 

*^'*4reo MAC*'"''’ 

12) A21-920a • CABLE ADDRESS "EMCOMACH'* 



Playev- 

e.p.averSbu«.eA^ 

5 Hits /5 Location ' ^,^3, p,ash, 

" 'ReTolation. Bonus & Triple Strike 100. 

2/25C play recommended. 


2/2bc piay 

electronic manufacturing CO 


electronic manufacturing corp. 
3401 N. Cahlornia Ave. 
-'rwIcC^IN'cHICAGO 


Alii 


also delivering Gay 90's 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 


67 





CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

Count every word including all words in firm name. Num- 
bers in address count as one word. Minimum ad accepted 
$5.00. CASH OR CHECK MUST ACCOMPANY ALL ORDERS 
FOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. If cash or check is NOT en- 
closed with order your classified ad will be held for following 
issue pending receipt of your check or cash. 

NOTICE — $83 Classified Advertisers (Outside USA add $52 
to your present subscription price). You are entitled to a 
classified ad of 40 words in each week’s issue for a period of 
One Full Year, 52 consecutive weeks. You are allowed to 
change your Classified Ad each week if you so desire. All 
words over 40 will be billed at the rate of 204 per word. 
Please count words carefully. Be sure your Classified Ad is 
sent to reach New York publication office by Wednesday, 12 
noon, of preceding week to appear in the following week’s 
issue. 

Classified Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

Send all copy to: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, N.Y., N.Y. 10019 


COIN MACHINES 
WANTED 


WANTED TO BUY OUT SELLING STOCKS ONE OR 
two years old Jennings slot machines. Wurlitzer 
juke boxes and Pinball games two or four players, 
make an offer to AUTOMATTJANST N STORGATAN 
19BJUV, SWEDEN. 


WANTED: Midway Red Balls, Joker Balls and Joker’s 
Wild. Any Condition. Contact AMERICAN MUSIC CO., 
219 First Ave. South Great Falls, Montana. (406) 
452-7301. 


WANT — Pool Tables, Personal music equipment, Sco- 
pitone film, 69 - 68 model Phonographs new and 
used. Phono Vue attachments, Distribution of allied 
products. Write stating make, model, condition and 
best cash price. ST. THOMAS COIN SALES. 669 TAL- 
BOT ST., ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO, CANADA, AREA 
519-631-9550. 


WANTED - SEEBURG CONSOLETTES AND L.P.C.l’s. 
HENDON AUTOMATICS LTD., 50, CREWYS ROAD 
LONDON N.W.2, ENGLAND. 


OLD BALL GUM OR PEANUT MACHINES, table model 
games of skill or chance from 1950 & earlier, early 
arcade machines, slots, any quantity or condition. 
SACKIN, 318 E. 70 St., N.Y.C., N.Y. 10021 - 212- 
628-0413. 


COIN MACHINES 
FOR SALE 


FOR SALE: Model 14 Auto Photo, EXCELLENT condi- 
tion. Call or Write. New in original cartons. Hollywood 
Driving Range. 15 ball golf fame. Closeout $295 ea. 
CLEVELAND COIN INTERNATIONAL, 2025 Prospect 
Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. Phone (216) 861-6715. 


NEVADA FRUIT (SLOT) MACHINE PRESENTS THE 
NEW RAVEN ELECTRONICS' solid-state line of fruit 
(slot) machines. Keno and Mini-Bingos. Write for 
more information. 165 Bingos — All Models — Mills, 
and Jennings parts. Write or call anytime: NEVADA 
FRUIT MACHINE CO., P.O. Box 5734, Reno, Nevada 
89503. (702) 329-3932. 


FOR SALE: Jukeboxes, pinballs, arcade, guns, base- 
balls, Kiddie rides. European football machines. For 
Export: Uprights, bingos, consoles, slots and punch- 
boards. Contact: MYRON SUGERMAN INTERNA- 
TIONAL, 140 Central Ave., Hillside, N.J. (201) 923- 
6430. 


FOR SALE/EXPORT - Bally slots $295 & up; Mills 
Open Front, like new, $285; Mills HiTop $125; Jen- 
nings Galaxy $285. Uprights; Clover Belle $300; 
Keeney Super Bonus $300; Draw Belles $75. Large 
stock Bally Bingos. Bally parts for export. .BALLY 
DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 390 East 6th St, P. 0. 
Box 7457, Reno, Nevada 89502. (702) 323-6157. 


BINGOS FOR EXPORT: Big Wheels, Zodiacs, Orients, 
Bountys, Golden Gates, Lidos, Can Cans, Bikinis, 
Lagunas and Roller Derbys. Pay out up-rights. Sega 
Missile guns like new $850. Midways Sea Raider 
like new $550. D & P MUSIC, 27 East Philadelphia 
Street, York, Penna. 17401— Phone (717)848-1846. 


FOR SALE: Keeney Black Dragons, Wild Arrow, Twin 
Dragons, Flaming Arrows and Mountain Climbers. 
Also Bally Slot Machines, Triple Bells, Draw Bell and 
Buckley Track Odds. Want Old Slots. SASKATCHE- 
WAN COIN MACHINE CO., 1025-104th St., North 
Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada. Phone 445-2989 
— Area Code 306. 


FOR EXPORT: Late games. Phonos, Vending. Write for 
our latest listing. ADVANCE DISTRIBUTING COM- 
PANY, 2820 North Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Missouri 
63107- (314) 652-1600. 


FOR SALE: SEEBURG LPCl’s $525; LPC480's $595; 
Electra $675; Student Princes $425; Rockmaters 
$395; Shangri Las $350; Fast Balls $495; Sega Bas- 
ketball $350; Spin Wheel $395; Derby Days $365. 
OPERATORS SALES, INC., 4122 Washington Avenue, 
New Orleans, La. 70125. Phone 822-2370 (504). 


FOR SALE: Large selection used Pin Games to choose 
from, write for price list. BIRD MUSIC DISTRIBU- 
TORS, INC., Manhattan, Kansas, Box B, or Phone: 
778-5229. 


USED WURLITZER PHONOGRAPHS, all 200 model's, 
from 2700 up. Special quantity prices for whole- 
salers and exporters. Call OR write: UNITED DISTRI- 
BUTORS, INC., 902 W. Second Street, Wichita, Kan- 
sas, 67203. 


FOR SALE: 12 Panorams Peep Shows RCA 16mm 
with timers. Mint condition. Also film B&W used 
$8. Color $25. Approx. 400 ft. Money makers. R. 
RICHTER, 1063 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Z. 94103. 


SLOT MACHINES: Bally Jolly Taverner $275; Hold & 
Draw $375; Upright Multi slot $250. All hopper mod- 
els. Sega Diamond $120. PHONOGRAPHIC, Clare- 
mont Road, London, N.W. 2., England. 


FOR SALE: Cleaned and shopped: GOTT: King of Dia- 
monds, Happy Clown, Cross Town, World Fair, Buck- 
eroo. Central Park, Funland, Skyline. WILLIAMS: Al- 
pine Club, Teachers Pet, Full House, Derby Day, See- 
burg AQ-160, Rockola Rhapsody 11. D & L COIN 
MACHINE CO., Box 1713, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
(717) 234-2245. 


FOR SALE: Orient, Zodiac, Bahama Beach, Follies 
Bergere, Shoot A Line, Border Beauty, Golden Gate, 
Show Gal, Ballerina, Wms Blazer S. A. $395; Rock- 
ola Princess Royal $435; Rhapsody $325; AMI JAL 
$170; K200 $180; Seeburg #220 $225; Keeney Su- 
per Bell Twin, Twin Super Wild Cats, Bally Money 
Honey, Multipliers, Wms 8 Ball Flipper $245. Keeney 
Twin Red Arrow, Twin Tim Buc Too, Trailblazer. 
CROSSE DUNHAM & CO., 225 Wright Ave., "F" 
Gretna, La., 70053. 


FOR SALE: Two Panoram peep show machines with 
optional 25t or 50t coin chute. Continuous reel that 
holds 1,000 ft. of 16mm film. Operated with a time 
unit. PHIL GOULD, 224 Market Street, Newark, N.J. 
Tel: 201- MArket 4-3297. 


BINGOS AND 6 CARD GAMES AVAILABLE INCLUDING 
Silver Sails and Golden (Sates. These games are 
shopped! Call WASSICK NOVELTY at (304) 292-3791 
Morgantown, West Virginia. 


FOR SALE: Reconditioned Bargains: Bally Wiggler (4 
pi) $395; Safari (2 pi) $395; Surfer (1 pi) $295; Ba- 
zaar (1 pi) $245; Wild Wheels (2 pi) $245; Discotek 
(2 pi) $225; Sheba (2 pi) $195; Gottlieb Spin Wheel 
(4 pi) $395; Central Park (1 pi) $195; Buckaroo (1 
pi) $165; Sweet Hearts (1 pi) $125. MICKEY ANDER- 
SON AMUSEMENT COMPANY, 314 East 11th Street, 
Erie, Pa. 16503 Phone (814) 452-3207. 


FOR SALE - NEW IN CASE: 300 Jennings Double lOt 
Vendors. Retail at $59.95 — 25.00 each. All types 
used Novelties. Call or Write: E. L. Simmons, DAN- 
VILLE AMUSEMENT CO., INC., 620 Westover Drive, 
Danville, Va. Phone 792-5044. 


POOL TABLES— Large selection of all makes and mod- 
el available. Completely reconditioned or in "as 
is" condition for immediate shipment at very attrac- 
tive prices. Also large selections of pin games, 
shuffles, guns and music— Phone or write: EASTERN 
NOVELTY DISTRIBUTORS, INC., 3726 TONNELE 
AVENUE, NORTH BERGEN, NEW JERSEY, 07047 
(201) 864-2424. 


FOR SALE: 2 Player Preview, Gottlieb $125 ea.; 1 Player 
Ice Revue, Gottlieb $175 ea.; 1 Player Bank A Ball, 
Gottlieb $170 ea.; 4 Player Happy Clown, Gottlieb 
$175 ea.; 4 Player Dodge City, Gottlieb $295 ea.; 1 
Player Full House, Williams $179.50 ea. All equip- 
ment A-1 condition. Send 1/3 deposit. CENTRAL 
MUSIC CO., P. 0. Box 284, Kileen, Texas 76541. 


FOR SALE: PANORAMS NEW MARK DUAL 8 - Write 
or call URBAN INDUSTRIES, INC., P.O. Box 31, Lou- 
isville, Kentucky 40201. (502) 969-3227. 


SANDLER SEZ: Save $ — Look at these buys! Bally 4 
players: Wiggler $295; Dogies $395; Cosmos $345; 
Gators (new— orig. ctn.) $550; Safari (2 player) 
$325. Single Player Games; Funland $195; Op Pop 
Pop $295; Dixieland $295; Bally World Cup $350; 
Midway Fun Ball $195; AMI Rowe JBM (200 sel.) 
$425; AMI Rowe Jan (200 sel.) $525; Rockola 1488 
(120 sel.) $95; Wurlitzer Wallboxes 104-254 (100 
sel.) Model 5200 $35 each; Rockola Wallboxes, 
Model 1546 (120 sel.) $20 each. Ditchburn Music 
Maker background music units, new. Call or write; 
SANDLER VENDING COMPANY, 236 Girard Ave. N., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55405. Phone (612) 377-1140. 


FOR SALE: Shuffle alleys: Midway Regulation $475; 
Uniteds; Pegasus $575; Delta $675. MOHAWK SKILL 
GAMES CO., Ogden Whitbeck, Prop., 67 Swaggertown 
Road, Scotia, N. Y. 12302. 


FOR SALE: Airports $415; College Queens $545; Pad- 
docks $390; Suspenses $315; Expos $475; Doozies 
$275; Fast Balls $425; Smart Sets $530; Spooks 
Guns $475; Gators $465; Cosmos $345; Spinner 
$50; C.C. Astronauts $370; Drive Maters $565; [Mid- 
way Dog Fights $460; Sea Raiders $535; Sega Rifle- 
mans $250; Computer Quiz $675; Sports World 
Computers $795; All-Tech Twirlybirds $175; All-Tech 
Hi-Way Patrols $125. Also large stock of bingos. 
NEW ORLEANS NOVELTY COMPANY, 1055 Dryades 
Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70113. Tel (504) 
529-7321 - CABLE; NONOVCO 


EMPLOYMENT 

SERVICE 

BINGO MECHANICS WANTED; Legal territory of Ne- 
vada, 5 day, 40 hour work week. MUST have past 
Bingo experience. State age, references, past ex- 
perience. Send photo if possible. Write or phone: 
UNITED COIN MACHINE (io., 2621 South Highland, 
Las Vegas, Nevada. Phone (702) 735-5000. 

RECORDS-MUSIC 

WANT: RECORDS, 45's and LP’s Surplus returns, over- 
stock, cut-outs, etc. Call or Write: HARRY WARRINER 
AT: KNICKERBOCKER MUSIC CO., 453 McLean Ave., 
Yonkers, New York 10705. GR 6-7778 

45 RPM RECORDS, NEW. NO QUANTITY TOO LARGE 
or small. Highest prices paid. Write stating quantity 
on hand. TONY GALGANO DIST. CO. 4135 W. ARMIT- 
AGE, CHICAGO 39, ILL. (Tel. Dickens 2-7060) 

USED 45 RPM RECORDS. ALL TYPES AS THEY RUN, 
right off the route. No sorting or picking. We pay 
freight from anywhere in U.S.A. Standing order avail- 
able for regular shippers. JALEN AMUSEMENT CO., 
1215 S. HOWARD STREET - BALTIMORE, MARY- 
LAND 21230. 

HARD-TO-FIND SINGLES FOR PROBLEM LOCATIONS. 
Over 10,000 titles in stock at all times. Complete list 
504 (refunded first order). HOUSE OF RECORDS, 
P.O. BOX 22, SANTA MONICA, CALIF. 90401. 

WE Sell 45 Ips record dealers, collectors, one-stops, 
foreign — Send free catalogue. $7.00 per hundred, 
$63.00 per thousand. We need 45's Ips-Disk Jock- 
ey copies, surplus, overstock, cutouts. We buy any- 
thing. No questions asked. Cape International. Box 
#74, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11234. Phone: (212) 253-5916- 
5917. 

OFFERING ELEVEN CENTS FOR FORTY FIVES under 
eight months R&B — surplus, over stocks, BUT new. 
Ship freight collect to ESDAY, 1923 Kilson, Santa 
Ana, Calif. NO C.O.D.'s. Check by return mail. 

FREE CIRCULAR - Hard to find NEW country record 
albums and 8 track tape cartridges. Fiddle tunes, 
waltzes, blue grass, etc. Such artists as Mac Wise- 
man, Hylo Brown, the legendary J.E. Mainer, others. 
UNCLE JIM O'NEAL, Box AC, Arcadia, California 
91006. 

USED 45 RPM RECORDS in lots of ten thousand or 
more, 74 each, cash. WORCESTER MUSIC CO., INC., 
66 Southgate Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

PARTY ALBUMS, LOWEST WHOLESALE PRICES. Large 
assortment. Free lists. 45’s records, packaged. Write 
tor prices. EMPIRE INDUSTRIES, 4610 Liberty Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15224. Telephone (412) 682-8437. 

OFFERING EIGHT CENTS each plus freight for forty 
fives, not over six months old, as they come off your 
routes. Ship freight collect to ESDAY, 1923 Kilson, 
Santa Ana, Calif. No C.O.D.'s — Guaranteed count 
payment by return mail. 

COIN MACHINE 
SERVICES 

ACE LOCKS KEYED ALIKE. SEND LOCKS AND THE 
key you want them mastered to $1.00 each less 
10% lots of 50 or more. RANDEL LOCK SERVICE, 
61 ROCKAWAY AVENUE, VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. 
11580. TEL: 516-VA 5-6216. OUR 35th YEAR IN 
VENDING. 

DuKANE SKI N SKORE, GRAND PRIX, TAGIT LABEL 
vendor parts available. Power supplies, computer 
assemblies repaired and tested with factory equip- 
ment. Plexiglass tops also available. See your autho- 
rized distributor OR write NOVEMBER CORPORATION 
1351 W. Grand, Chicago, Illinois 60622. (312) - 
733-2988. 

SPEED UP YOUR COIN COLLECTIONS - New portable 
coin sorting, counting and packing machine, com- 
bined as one unit — hand operated — portable — 
weighs 18 pounds — with automatic stops and tubes 
for different sjzes. Apply SEIFERT MACHINERY CO., 
Box 3421, Philadelphia, Pa. 19122. 

BACK ISSUES — Cash Box, Billboard, Record World, 
Hit Parader, Best Songs, Country Song Roundup, 
Down Beat, Metronome, Variety and other record 
and music publications. Bought, traded, sold. Also 
record catalogs, all years. WILLIAM HASKETT, 3 E. 
Main, Mooresville, Indiana 46158. 

ACE LOCKS KEYED ALIKE or to your key. All packages 
insured. $1.00 each less 10% over 25. FOUNTAIN 
KEY SERVICE, P.O. Box 8123, Pine Sta., Albany, 
N.Y. 12203. 

HUMOR 


DEEJAYS! 11,000 hilarious classified one-liners, $10. 
Or send $15 for above plus 7,500 additional "Clever 
Remarks!" Unconditionally guaranteed. You must 
be delighted or we'll refund your money. Comedy 
catalog free on request. Edmund Orrin, Boyer Road, 
Mariposa, Calif. 95338 


DEEJAY GAGS GALORE! One liners, artist quips, record 
intro's, Fall-Winter issue JUST OUT. We write for dee- 
jays only. Topical, clean, Yocks tor Jocks. "DEEJAY 
DIGEST" - $2.00 - GET FREE BACK ISSUE WITH - 
FIRST ORDER. MORRIS, 7047 Franklin, Hollywood, 
California 90028 


CLASSIFIED POWER! 

CLASSIFIED AD RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

Got machines to sell? Is there something you’re 
looking to buy? Maybe you’d like to move some 
used 45’s or need a route mechanic? For every 
coin machine need, use the Cash Box Clas- 
sified. 


Type Or Print Your Ad Message Here: 


Classified Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

Send all copy fo: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10019 


68 


Cash Box — February 28, 1970 








When you are selling music, only the finest 
high fidelity reproduction is acceptable. 
Patrons expect to hear their selections with a 
true presence of the recording artists. 

The Wurlitzer sound system with full stereo 
separation, individual bass and treble controts 
for each channel and automatic volume level 
control accomplishes just this. 

When you install a paging system with the 
phonograph, you offer a location unmatched 
versatility. Another reason why Wurlitzer is 
the leader in automatic music. 


WURLITZER 


WURLITZER COMPANY. NORTH TONAWANDA, N.Y 14120 

/ 14 Years Of Musical Experience 









The Lighthouse plays for peace: “The 
Chant (Nam IVIyoho Renge’ Kyo)" 
#47-9808. 

The basic chant of the Shoshu Buddhist 
movement (meaning “the sound of the 
universe brings inner happiness and world 
peace”). A new musical sound for the 
Lighthouse, already picked by Gavin and 
the trade magazines. Getting airplay in 
New York, Los Angeles, Boston, 

Washington, D.C.— and that’s just the 
beginning. 



It’s news when The Friends 
of Distinction release a 
new single. It’s not news 
when it hits the charts. 

Expect another smash with “Love 
or Let Me Be Lonely” #74-0319 
with another fine production by 
Ray Cork, Jr. From their upcoming 
album, “Real Friends.” 



When was the last time 
“The Last Supper” broke you 
up? Welcome Ace Trucking 
Company. 

Top improvisational comedy 
groups are as scarce as grass at 
a policeman’s ball. The Ace 
Trucking Co. is one of America's 
best— and their new LP 
will cut across diverse consumer 
markets. You’ve seen them on 
the Tom Jones Show; they’ll also 
be with Jones in Vegas and 
other choice places. 



Henry Mancini; his sound is his 
signature again on “Theme from‘Z.’ ” 

Single getting strong sales, heavy airplay 
in 12 major markets as film “Z” opens 
across America. Latest LP, “Six Hours Past 
Sunset,” continues very well. Another 
Mancini plus; three Grammy Award 
nominations for “Love Theme From 
Romeo & Juliet.” 


RCA Victrola: now, Stereo 8 
classical Tapes bargain-priced 
for today’s mobile market. 
$4.95 suggested list price. 
Great names in music, like 
Munch, Reiner, and Toscanini. 
“Collectors of cartridge tapes 
will find many enticing releases 
in (this) new Victrola series”— 

High Fidelity. 15 tapes now 
selling briskly, with 5 new 
releases in March. 




One great thing about “Minnie’s 
Boys” is that Jane just recorded a 
big song from it. 

“He Gives Me Love” #74-0316 is one of 
those slow, burning ballads that could have 
been written just for Miss Morgan. (It’s from 
the new play about the Marx Brothers.) 
Watch for her new album, too; “Jane 



Meet your new 
dinner companion in 
the Empire Room 
of New York’s 
Waldorf: Eddy 
Arnold. 

If you're coming into 
Manhattan Feb. 23-Mar, 7, 
now you know where to 
take her ’til the wee 
small hours. Eddy’s 
never sounded better— 
or more contemporary. 



You may have seen 
this 14-year-old on the 
Kraft Music Hall. He’ll 
be on The Ed Sullivan 
Show March 1 , and 
starting April 22 at the 
Sands in Vegas. You’ll 
be hearing plenty from 
him on RCA. 


The newest things goingon,are goingon RCA Records and Tapes